Has anyone read “Deep Nutrition”? - Parkinson's Movement

Parkinson's Movement
17,361 members17,224 posts

Has anyone read “Deep Nutrition”?

LAJ12345
LAJ12345

I have been reading this book and I am finding it very disturbing. I would recommend anyone who is interested in diet as a cure reads it.

She explains why sugar is poison to our system which is well documented, but then she goes into how vegetable seed oils are just as poisonous for our bodies, and especially our brains. Her advice is to go back to traditional cooking methods and cut out all sugar and unnaturally extracted vegetable oil, and use olive oil, butter, coconut and peanut oil instead.

Our diets are damaging our genes which in turn is damaging the health and genes of our children and grandchildren.

Available on kindle amazon.com/Deep-Nutrition-Y...

19 Replies
oldestnewest

I haven't read it, but the article below just popped up in my Facebook feed and I think it is along the same lines.

tastecooking.com/sally-fall...

LAJ12345
LAJ12345
in reply to Juliegrace

Yes, that looks along the same lines. Definitely worth reading if you are into nutrition and exercise.

yes, another good book on the subject is "nourishing traditions". the vegetable oils are bad. we have to go back to the animal fats. after the introduction of vegetable oils, margarine, crisco - thats when we started seeing all the heart related health problems and obesity. i use butter and olive oil, and i fry with lard. they have us fooled that animal fats arent good for you. you cant even buy a decent roast with some fat on it anymore. people in other countries that dont use vegetale fats dont have the heart problems and obesity that we have.

I read it and likewise found her comments on vegetable oils disturbing. Turns out she is wrong - she paints vegetable oil as a major villain based on some early work by Spiteller. But in later work Spiteller takes a different view[1]: "In contrast to mammalian-derived food, consumption of plant oils was found to be much less atherogenic." Likewise current work shows the major polyunsaturated fat in vegetable oils, linoleic acid, is helpful, contrary to her claims. [2][3]

[1]Is Atherosclerosis a Multifactorial Disease or Is It Induced by a Sequence of Lipid Peroxidation Reactions? GERHARD SPITELLER

[2] SUBSTITUTION OF MONOUNSATURATED FATTY ACID FOR LINOLEIC ACID AND THE RISK OF ISCHEMIC STROKE Stine Krogh Venø

[3 ]Linoleic Acid in Adipose Tissue and Development of Ischemic Stroke: A Danish Case‐Cohort Study Stine Krogh Venø,

LAJ12345
LAJ12345
in reply to park_bear

But 1) above he wrote in 2006 then this in 2014:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/253... (The action of peroxyl radicals, powerful deleterious reagents, explains why neither cholesterol nor saturated fatty acids cause atherogenesis and age-related diseases.)

Isn’t he saying the polyunsaturated fatty acids turn into hydro peroxide’s when heated or homogenised which cause the damage? I don’t quite understand it. He seems to be agreeing with her I think?

3) above look at the graph figure 3) showing what the group of high and low LA consumers eat. The ones eating with high LA presumably from eating vegetable oils drink less alcohol, eat less red meat more chicken, and more vegetables, and less processed cereals, less fatty dairy products, and more margarine. How do they know it is the higher LA reducing the risk of stroke not say the reduced alcohol and more vegetables? Seems to me the ones using vegetables and margarine are probably people who are doing what they think is healthy so might have healthier life style all around. The ones with higher alcohol might be people who have sat around in smoky bars a lot more than those with lower alcohol (and higher LA).

I am not so sure she is wrong.

park_bear
park_bear
in reply to LAJ12345

Re graph figure (3), two things stand out - animal fats and alcohol. As you point out either one could be the source of the problem. Let's look at some more studies:

Here is a review of recent nutritional studies: pdfs.semanticscholar.org/49...

The gist of it is the benefits of vegetable oils are unclear, but no one is saying they make things worse.

Here is a study that says dairy better than meat:

academic.oup.com/ajcn/artic...

This study mdpi.com/2227-9032/5/2/29/htm

agrees but says: "While dairy fat (milk, cheese) is associated with a slightly lower CVD risk compared to meat, dairy fat results in a significantly greater CVD risk relative to unsaturated fatty acids. "

From here: academic.oup.com/ajcn/artic...

"Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and microparticles are emerging as novel markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, which could potentially be modified by dietary fat. We have previously shown that replacing dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) with monounsaturated or n–6 (ω-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs or PUFAs, respectively) improved lipid biomarkers, blood pressure, and markers of endothelial activation, but their effects on circulating EPCs and microparticles are unclear....Target compositions for total fat, SFAs, MUFAs, and n–6 PUFAs (%TE) were as follows: SFA-rich diet (36:17:11:4; n = 64), MUFA-rich diet (36:9:19:4; n = 62), and n–6 PUFA-rich diet (36:9:13:10; n = 66). Circulating EPC, endothelial microparticle (EMP), and platelet microparticle (PMP) numbers were analyzed..

Results

Relative to the SFA-rich diet, MUFA- and n–6 PUFA-rich diets decreased EMP (−47.3%, −44.9%) respectively and PMP (−36.8%, −39.1%) numbers (overall diet effects, P < 0.01). The MUFA-rich diet increased EPC numbers (+28.4%; P = 0.023). "

-------

The Spiteller 2014 paper addresses theoretical mechanisms, whereas the above studies are measuring actual impact of diet. These nutitional studies merit greater weight. That said, one lesson we can draw from Spiteller is not to subject PUFAs to heat - maybe frying is not such a good way to cook, and if you have to, use a saturated oil.

I have yet to see any nutritional study saying vegetable oils made health worse (trans fats excepted, but they have been pretty much been eliminated from the food supply by now).

LAJ12345
LAJ12345
in reply to park_bear

Yes, complicated isn’t it. Olive oil may be the safest option then. And not too much food. And no processed food.

Well to hedge my bets tonight I made vegetarian curry for dinner with a spoonful each of butter, olive oil and coconut oil!

I am certainly not going to be eating huge quantities of animal fats and dairy fats but might get rid of the vegetable oil just in case and use olive oil instead.

Thanks LAJ,

I've now just dumped a couple of doughnuts staring at me for a while into the bin. Would never buy any of those again

I still have a 250ml of veg oil though, tough to dump that into the bin, but i was already considering shifting permanently to coconut oil once the veg oil runs out, your post just help consolidate my thought :)

LAJ12345
LAJ12345
in reply to Grumpy77

Yes, I probably wouldn’t go full on into maximising fat intake by gorging on cream butter and pork crackling but definitely sugar or highly processed white flour seems a clear no no so I am afraid the donut had to go! I have never eaten margarine as we studied it in chemistry and I thought then it sounded poisonous so vowed never to touch it again.

Interesting she also says not too much fruit either as it has a lot of sugar.

Looks like it is nuts and seeds for snacks! And green leaves.

I have just started to sprout things on my window sill and it is quite satisfying seeing all those tiny wee roots growing. However then I read articles on bacteria growing on sprouts which make me nervous! I feel sad blanching all those wee babies to death and destroying all their enzymes. Maybe I read too much!

jujulini
jujulini
in reply to LAJ12345

im not giving up my cream, butter and pork crackling!

LAJ12345
LAJ12345
in reply to jujulini

She doesn’t say to give these up, just vegetable oils. She actually encourages the use of cream and butter. So you’re safe for now :)

jujulini
jujulini
in reply to LAJ12345

oh i know. i have no intention of giving them up. aside from mercury poisoning causing my pd, i have always been healthy - only weigh 100 # and eat alot of butter, heavy cream and animal fat. (along with fruits & vegies)

I haven't read it but can't imagine why vegetable seed oils like hemp, walnut or sunflower would be any different to olive oil?

alexask
alexask
in reply to grower

They are inflammatory. Olive oil is ok raw, not so good cooked. Pork fat or Coconut oil is probably the best for you for cooking. In general if people have been eating the stuff for 10,000's of years it is probably fairly benign.

jujulini
jujulini
in reply to alexask

youre right alexask. and look at other countries where they consume alot of butter and meat fats. the u.s. has many more unhealthy & obese people, so what we are currently doing is definitely wrong.

grower
grower
in reply to alexask

I beg to differ, walnut is high in omega 3 and is a strong anti-inflammatory, sunflower Omega 6 and same, and hemp oil "Scientists from the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda (US) showed that cannabinoids can suppress inflammatory and neuropathic pain without causing analgesic tolerance." People have indeed been eating these oils since ancient ages too.

LAJ12345
LAJ12345
in reply to alexask

I think it is more about the extraction process. Virgin olive oil etc can easily be squeezed out of the olive but some of the seed oils need to be chemically extracted then purified with lots of processes and don’t come with all the other natural compounds which act as antioxidents.

grower
grower
in reply to LAJ12345

We're lucky to have local nut oil producers here who just literally squeeze them. Wouldn't be without my walnut or hemp oil !

Olive oil, avocado oil, coconut oil and goat milk ghee is what I use. Olive oil for no-heat food prep.

You may also like...