Parkinson's Movement
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Some research support for "fast walking" … but no mention of PD

"A fast pace is generally five to seven kilometres per hour, but it really depends on a walker's fitness levels; an alternative indicator is to walk at a pace that makes you slightly out of breath or sweaty when sustained."

If I recall correctly, that's very similar to what John Pepper recommends.

Article: Walking faster could make you live longer: research

medicalxpress.com/news/2018...

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I found it easiest to sustain a peak heart rate while fast walking than either cycling or rowing or working with weights. Probably because it is load bearing exercise. So in my opinion John Pepper calls it right! My problem is my fox terrier doesn't agree - too much sniffing around ...

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When you say "cycling" I assume you mean cycling using a stationary bike, so I'm surprised that you find it easier to sustain a peak heart rate while fast walking compared to cycling.

I like fast walking but I get discomfort in my right knee when I do it. Cycling on a stationary bike works well for me.

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oops no meant actual cycling; I agree stationary cycling works well re heart rate

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… so I'm guessing that "rowing" also means actual rowing ...

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no that is on a rowing machine - it is partly fitness level for me as it has taken me a while to recover from a heart procedure. Almost there on the waterrower but it has taken months - that's my preference for all round exercise

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All the research like this about any type of exercise that makes you sweat is hard to do makes your heart pump harder has found the same 2 thing. Set on your ass drinking beer you die young you get fat your heart stops working.

Get off your ass and do exercise that makes your heart beat fast for a hour every day you can still drink beer chase women or men and catch them. You may still die young but you want care.

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As I understand it, that particular piece about walking fast is pointing out the health benefits for the general population as a whole.

The purpose of 'fast walking' (and other pwp-specific exercises) is primarily aimed at movement and slowing the effects of the disease.

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I agree.

After giving it some thought, I decided to do the post because:

1. The recommended walking pace seems to match John Pepper's recommendation for PwPs.

2. At the very least, the article might encourage more of us to do more exercise.

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The problem with JPs recommendations is not exercise but the exclusive approach, the one way is the right way and the claims for disease reversal even when success results internationally are one person who by his own admission "has PD but not idiopathic PD"

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Some more-recent posts have shown an easing up on the "exclusive approach", but we'll have to continue to keep an eye on this.

As for the exercise, I wouldn't be surprised if a future clinical trial found that fast walking could be just as beneficial (for PwPs) as high-cadence cycling (or treadmill training, or rowing, or ... ).

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Can this study be readily generalised to PD.?

For example - Fast walking as opposed to slow walking has a positive effect on Heart Disease but not on Cancer

"there was no evidence to suggest pace had a significant influence on cancer mortality however."

Here is another one just for fun, Study finds that chewing gum while walking affects both physical and physiological function

medicalxpress.com/news/2018...

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Two lessons from this:

1. I need to respond to comments more quickly.

2. I need to buy some chewing gum.

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yes thats about right i fast walk 4 kl it takes me 30 mins i do this 7 days a week 52 weeks a year then go and do other exercising as well for an hour 7 days a week as well.im 71.i have been doing it for a very long time.but some times u push through the pain barrier i do this before i take any meds.

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Hi Motherfather,

When you say that you have been doing this for a very long time, how many years is that?

Also, if you don't mind me asking, how much has your PD progressed during that time, and how much has your medication increased during that time?

Thanks.

Jeff

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well its a bit hard to tell how long i have had it as i went a long time not knowing i had it as my doctor kept telling me theres nothing wrong with me i knew i had p,d so i told him i want to see a specialist..with in 10 mins he told me i had pd so i think ive had it for about 6 years now.about 8 or 9 months ago i went to china for stem cell treatment it helped me..but i knew it wont cure me but i was happy i did it . well i take 1 madopar 200/50 3 times a day.1 madopar slow release 125 tablets 2 or 3 times a day depends how i feel.im now taking the thiamine pills total of 4000 ml a day its starting to help plus the usual vitamins . 1 nuro patch as well if the thiamine pills work ill cut down on a lot ofthe stuff i take,,im about 5 11 tall 76 kg i even have abs from all the exercising i do. as for my sex life its good.not sure what else i can say jeff.hope it helps.

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Thanks very much for all the information.

In your first comment, I understood you to say that for a very long time you have been doing 30 mins per day of fast walking. I was interested to know how you felt the fast walking had helped you (i.e. in terms of slower disease progression and/or slower escalation of medication).

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well thats hard jeff as i always have been a very fit person i have always exercised my work was very hard as well.. demolition work removing sheets of asbestos from roofs them kind of things.its not just the fast walking as i can do chin ups as well. we have a park here were i can do all theses things.i can do things that younger men cant as i have been doing it for a very long time,,its all push push.and dont give up,i never think of slowing down.

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I see what you are saying. With the number of different exercises that you do, it is difficult to tell what benefit any one of them is bringing.

Thanks for all your input.

Jeff

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Thanks for the mention. I wish could persuade somebody to do a specific study on fast walking because, at my age, it is rather difficult.

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It might be worth emailing Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the University of Sydney (see article above), as he is obviously a fan of fast walking (for general health). You could mention to him your background in fast walking (for PD) and ask his advice on the best way to pursue your goal of getting a formal trial done.

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Thanks Jeffrey. I'll try to find his email address from friends in Sydney.

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That's certainly one way to get it.

Another way would be to click on the following link, and then click on his name.

bjsm.bmj.com/content/52/12/761

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Thanks Jeff. I have written to him already.

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As far as exercise, I'll say this. I am less than a month past my diagnosis. All this exercising sounds great, and my wife and I have been doing the fast walking and I'm already building up on pushups, etc. We live on a farm outside any towns with gyms, etc. The intense program that I hear many others describing sounds like an ideal retirement lifestyle program. Unfortunately, those of us not retired, still working at our career to pay the bills and raise the kids (I'm 56) are not available for this much working out time to be most effective. I hope I can make it to my retirement years so I can do all this gym and other activity, but I am saying working-age people are at a disadvantage in this way. Does this make any sense?

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Hi FergusonJR,

Thanks for your input. What you say does indeed make sense.

From what I've read in research papers, opinion pieces, and comments from PwPs, exercise is good and more exercise is better. However, the bottom line is that, on the question of how much exercise is necessary, the jury is still out. With these two pieces of information in mind, each of us must choose an amount of exercise for ourselves. After that, we can modify that amount, if necessary, to take into account other commitments.

As for which type of exercise is best, I think the picture has become clearer quite recently with the publication of this report:

mayoclinicproceedings.org/a...

In my own case, although I'm retired and have lots of free time, I have chosen to do just one hour of exercise each day. I have purchased two (stationary) exercise bikes. One bike (about $200) I use for leg cycling, and the other (about $50) I use for arm cycling. I exercise first thing every morning. One morning leg cycling, the next morning arm cycling.

I hope that some of this information/opinion has been helpful.

Jeff

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This story is about a study for PwP. After 6 months of vigorous exercise, there was no change in PD symptoms. 30 minutes, 4 times a week, heart rate between 80-85% of max heart rate, on a treadmill:

michaeljfox.org/foundation/...

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Or, in the words of the article:

"After six months, researchers found that the motor symptoms of the high-intensity exercisers had not progressed, ..."

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