Parkinson's Movement
12,734 members11,316 posts

Walking Problems

Walking Problems

Hi,I've been diagnosed with PD for nearly 2 years now ,but lately I've been having lower legs problem.I exercise a lot and walk as much as I can,but lately regardless with the exercise I do my legs keep getting weaker.

I'm to the point where I can't exercise,if I do I can't walk for a couple days,my knee joints and ankle joints pain very bad while trying to walk,I don't know if this is normal or anything can be done about it, I take Levodopa/Carbidopa 100 mg/25mg 100/ 25 mg 2 tab 4 times a day ,sometimes they don't seem to do anything,my neurologist wants to see me in 1 year,that's too far away,I would like answers much sooner than that. Guy

24 Replies
oldestnewest

See an orthopedic pain manager. The joint pain may not be related to Parkinson's

3 likes
Reply

My experience is PD degrades everything - I end up suffering from what feels like overuse injury even though I have not overused.

Agreed a PD doctor would not likely be the right person to treat it.

3 likes
Reply

I have recently been suffering from knee and ankle pain. It turned out the knee pain was from a quadriceps tendonitis; the ankle pain probably something similar. This video has good instruction for ways to treat quadriceps tendonitis:

Reply

Your picture made my day, how cute.

6 likes
Reply

I would hope that you get better treatment for your PD than to only see someone once per year. Are you in an area where there are specialised PD nurses? You mention that sometimes your doses don't seem to have an effect. This suggests that either you are eating protein close to taking your dose or you are under-medicated and not reaching the "on" threshold.

John

2 likes
Reply

I have had 15 years of Neurologist visits and never had one span in between them larger than 6 months , usually 4 months. My family General Practitioner M.D. is the most valuable guy on my healthcare team, he is the leader. He has referred me to many different specialists over the years for many things but in the end it always is checked and followed up and the specialists questioned and that problem monitored by him. I see him once every 6 months unless there is a problem.

2 likes
Reply

How long do you have Parkinson and do you take any supplements ??

And what is your medication now ??

Reply

I would try some magnesium and nurofen before excercise until you can get to your neuro.

Lovely photo.

2 likes
Reply

Great picture! I have a similar problem; however, I also have Ataxia, in addition to PD. Also, I have moderated my exercise, after seeing my orthopedic doctor. He took x-rays, and I have severe arthritis in both knees, so I was given shots that put joint fluid back in both knees and specific exercise routine instructions and diagrams, by the orthopedic doctor, that have helped me immensely. Pool therapy exercise for range of motion exercises, on a regular basis is very helpful. Regular gym type exercise routines, that I used to do, cause too much wear and tear in my arthritic joints, so I do not do the heavier weight lifting, pushing exercises. Before I took Levodopa/Carbidopa my legs would stiffen up a lot and be very painful and I couldn't walk. Now that I am on a similar dose, like yours, most of the time, I can walk much better, and much further. I am concerned, however, that your neurological specialist is seeing you only once a year. I see mine at least once every six months, and when he feels that I need my medicine dosage upped, because of progression upon examination, he always sees me 2 to 3 weeks later to make sure the dosage is working for me. This last year I've seen my neurologist 5 times.I would recommend that you make an appointment to be seen A.S.A.P. Weakness in the legs, that seems to be progressing, with the joint pain you mention, does need to be evaluated, in my opinion. If you are not getting relief from the Levodopa/Carbidopa, then for sure you need to be reevaluated. If your neurologist will not see you soon, I would suggest you find a movement disorders specialist/neurologist who will make time to see you, or ask your GP/ family doctor to recommend you to another specialist, and ask him to call their office, so that an as appointment can be set up. I'm recommending those actions, because I had to go that route several years ago, when I had a doctor who just didn't seem to pay attention to some real problems I was having, like numbness in my hands and legs, peripheral neuropathy, resting tremor etc. I felt much better when I explained my problems to my family doctor, he examined me, and could see that I was really having trouble, and then he called the neurologist to set up an appointment to see me. Good luck Guy! Keep us informed on how you are doing!

4 likes
Reply

I would call and speak to your neurologist nurse or receptionist and let them know what your symptoms are. They usually will give you an earlier appointment or a suggest a medication change. The one year appointment is just a guideline inless you have a problem.

2 likes
Reply

Find a new doctor and make sure its a movement disorder specialist. Can't stress that enough

1 like
Reply

The cure is in your head I recommend to read books from Joe Dispaenza or try to find some videos. I hope you will figure it how to help yourself.You also have blog Howard Shifke there have a lots information about holistic approach.Best regards.Medication last one time and then stop to working that's not solution.

Reply

Hi delboy. I was wondering When you were diagnosed ?

Reply

Hi, I was diagnosed a year ago but I have symptoms from 2015.I am 39 age old.

1 like
Reply

Pretty young for that to happen,I don't know when I took it,the neurologist guessed I was late first or early 2nd stage,it will be 2 yrs in Oct.when I was diagnosed.

Reply

I have been exercising almost every day for 42 years. I used to jog for half an hour a day, but I had two discs removed and switched to walking, I did an hour and went four miles when I started. Then, a bit before i got diagnosed with PD my legs started giving me trouble. Rubbery, weak, sore. I discussed with PCP, PD specialist and chiropractor. They agreed it could be arthritis, Parkinson's, or the back surgery -- or all three! I saw a PT and got some stretches, which I do every day. I also see chiro, which is quite helpful. But I now walk for only half an hour maybe four times a week, and go only a mile and a half before legs make me stop (I do the rest of the hour on a stationary bike). I wish I could be more encouraging.

1 like
Reply

i also have problems walking and standing. my doctors concur in recommending water aquatics to keep body as strong as it can be. i''ve only done this 5 weeks but believe it is helping. i love the way my body responds in the pool. i feel the difference as i climb the steps out of the pool. we use foam dumbells and work on arms and posture boxing movements.

my YMCA offers this and the instructors are great and the class is very motivated.

1 like
Reply

as Roy Prop says joint pain may not be PD. Even consider statin side effect with doctor.

1 like
Reply

Get yourself a good therapy clinic, we all need it when it comes to PD. The one I visit provides acupuncture, deep tissue massage, electric stimulation, chiropractor, physical therapy, neck decompression on a machine.

Reply

Love your picture, thanks for sharing.

Reply

When I wake up, I can't walk until my meds AND Cannabis kick in It LETS ME WALK!

It WORKS.

EVERYONE, If it's not legal where you are, MAKE EM MAKE IT LEGAL! (At least in USA)

Reply

guy, This may sound overly simplistic,, but its worth considering. Could the problem be in the way you walk? PwP have a tendency to develop a shuffle which may come on slowly and not be noticed immediately. You start to walk more on the balls of your feet, with minimal lift and your legs don't get to straighten out completely with each step. You would notice that, when walking, that your line-of-sight, instead of being at eye level or above, will move downward toward your feet. If any of this sounds like it may apply to you, try this.

Put on a good pair of shoes. Walk in a straight line, lifting your knees (one at a time, Yuk, Yuk) and make sure that the heel comes down before the ball of the foot with each step . If your gait has unknowingly changed, this deliberate heel to toe movement may help, and hopefully ease your pain. I hope you can find some help in these words. Leg pain was preventing me from walking any distance, but on returning to the pre-parkie heel toe method I found both the pain reduced and the ability to walk distances increased. Good Luck!

1 like
Reply

That may be worth looking into,had both knees replaced 3 yrs ago,noticed one foot is straight on the other is pointing outwards,never noticed it before the operation,I will mention it to my neurologist. Thanks friend.

Reply

It is difficult fr me to answer your questions. I am not a doctor. I know that doctors regard 8 levodopa tablets a day as acceptable, but I think that it is far to much. The side effects are very serious and whether you are suffering from side effects I do not know.

You say you don't know if the Levodopa is helping you. My feeling is that if your don't notice any improvement in your condition after taking them then they aren't doing anything fr you and you might as well not be taking them.

I have been told that you can't just stop taking Levodopa pills, but in 1994 my neurologist took me off them and put me straight onto Selegiline, with no problems. Levodopa and Selegiline are not similar at all.

Levodopa does nothing to slow down the progression of Pd. Why anybody takes them if they don't even temporarily mask at least one symptom I don't know.

You have my sympathy.

Reply

You may also like...