Parkinson's Movement
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Biotin-B7- may be helpful for Parkinsons

Hey all

I joined this community months ago because I saw other people were taking thiamine like I was however I was not taking it for Parkinsons but for a long time unknown illness I think is genetic. Anyway after more reading thinking etc I am now trying biotin, and feeling better after a few days on it, and if you look at the symptoms of biotin genetic diseases- biotinidase is the main one- some of the symptoms match Parkinsons, and on review websites for biotin like here bulksupplements.com/pure-bi... or amazon people take it for MS, ALS, and some of the symptoms they report improvement of are a lot like Parkinsons so it might be helpful for that also.

in a patent on ALS, and MS they use up to 700mg a day

To treat biotin genetic diseases they use up to 1,000mg a day but usually between 5, and 300mg.

The LD50- the amount that kills 50% of the organisms it is given to- in rats is more than 10g/kg which is higher than alcohol, and table salt so biotin is very safe.

Tablets are sold as 5mg (5,000 mcg) , 10mg (10,000 mcg) , or on amazon they have 100mg (100,000 mcg) ones.

Or several places sell the raw powder.

It is helpful for hair, nails, and skin too.

Richest food source is bakers/brewers yeast with 200mcg per 100g.

I have been on 300mg a day for 5 days now with zero side effects. Great stuff.

Good luck all.

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You don't list symptoms you are having, but in my general search on biotin I did find a link to a disease called biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease. It would appear to be very rare and difficult to diagnose if one's doctor is not familiar. That's probably totally irrelevant, but I thought it was interesting anyways . . .

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ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/279...

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For the thiamine genetic diseases there is thiamine transporter deficiencies, transketolase deficiencies, and several other enzyme deficiencies.

Multiple carboxylase deficiency is the name of the biotin genetic diseases. It includes biotinidase deficiency- about 1 in 70,000 - can't recycle biotin-, and holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency about 1 in 200,000 - can't bond biotin to the four carboxylase enzymes needed for carbohydrate, fatty acid, and some amino acid metabolism. And there is one biotin transport defect. All treatable with large dose biotin. Dr Barry Wolf is a doctor that has studied them a lot. He has a saying-if you have to have a genetic disease make it a biotin one because it is so easy to treat. Webpages will have the symptoms of the disease if left untreated.

There is a SNP for biotin, and if someone had it taking biotin would help snpedia.com/index.php/Rs130...

My symptoms were brittle hair/ unhealthy hair, weird skin rash, conjunctivitis, severe mental, and physical fatigue when I first started getting sick. Rash, and conjunctivitis went away but fatigue got worse over the years. All the symptoms match a biotin disease. Will be doing an organic acid test soon (have to stop the biotin for a bit), and will see what comes up on that. Full enzyme deficiencies affect it; partial ones don't sometimes.

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Have you considered genetic (23&me) testing for BTD snip?

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Yes I don't have that SNP. I am getting better taking biotin, and will think about testing for biotin disease genes when I get more better. Whole exome sequencing might be the way to go though it is pricey in Australia- $4300 AUD. In the USA it is only 499 USD but they don't post internationally. Can link the website if wanted for WES in USA.

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Do let us know if it helps.

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