Parkinson's Movement
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High Dose Thiamine / B1 / Thiamin

In studies of Alzheimer's disease, subjects were treated with 1000 mg of oral thiamine hydrochloride three times a day for 2 to 12 months without any reports of adverse effects [7,25,26]. In a separate experiment, subjects were titrated up to 8000 mg per day over a 1-year period. The only side effects reported were nausea and indigestion in 2 subjects when they reached 7000 and 7500 mg per day [7]. There have been several clinical trials of thiamine derivatives for a variety of disorders that used doses between 300 and 900 mg per day in divided doses for periods up to 3 months. No side effects were reported in these studies [2,27-29].

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

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So what can we conclude out of it for PD? Thiamine chloride or sulphide? 100 MG or 1000 MG.

I have asked the same via email from the Italian doctor and waiting for the reply

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Thiamine chloride.

..."...Dear Roy,

We don't use benfothiamine because previous trials report it does not enter in the neural cells, that's why it is not used for the diseases which don't affect the Central Nervous System (Bettendorff L.).We administer thiamine cloridrate."

Doc Costantini

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Are you taking Magnesium with the Vit B1?

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Yes. See my Profile and look up my post reg mag

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Okay so the side effects were minimal. Is there any evidence in these studies for efficacy?

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much evidence to include videos

ultimaedizione.eu/videos-pa...

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Have you ever tried the lipid soluble thiamine derivative benfoitiamine? Next question a have you read anything that is against it as a therapy? Been taking 300 mg along with 4g B 12 for a couple months no negative side effects . Just better mobility than when I forget to take it. Don swear to know if that is b12 or benfotiamine or the combo.

Oh, never mind I just read a previous post of yours about it.

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I do not say

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This study done in 2017 shows elevated levels of B1 was harmful to humans:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

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I will accept a slight cognitive effect for the greatly reduced PD symptoms.

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I didn’t read the entire paper, but of what I did read, stated the opposite.

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I read it and it sure didn't sound like B1 had a positive affect. Quite the opposite, which is disappointing. But then you have earlier studies like this one -- ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/265... that seem to say just the opposite. What are we to think?

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Think! What will happen to those discouraged by intimidation and false words against thiamin HCI. Only the ravages and progression of Parkinsons.

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I do not care what the papers say as long as B1 really helps me big time. I hope that will be for long time.

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I would really love to hear from someone who has tried the B1 supplementation and had substantial results...

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Yes, I'm one of them. I regained my mental and physical power and the arm tremor went down more than 50%. I can say for sure I'm in a much better shape than before starting on March 24, 18. I do not know if this improvement will stay for ever but for now it does help. Also I noticed fast walking is helping, too.

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And by the way, I'm a computer programmer and I was at the point to give up but my mental power is back. In addition I can use my right hand again with the mouse.

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I have completed year one very satisfied. Stopped the Parkinson's progression and suppressed the symptoms. See my profile.

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ion_ion and RoyProp, I'm so happy for you both that you have found relief. Can you tell me how much B1 you currently take and in what form? I am asking for my father who is 88. He has moderate dementia and a very hard time walking. One leg freezing up constantly. No real tremor except some essential tremor when his hands are in use that he inherited from his mother. He is currently taking 50/200 carbidopa/levodopa CR 3x a day. He weighs about 170 lbs. Any suggestions on what I should try him on?

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See my profile.

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If you take a look at this chart from the study Sunvox cited: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

You will see that random variation is many times larger than the detrimental effect alleged for B1. They claim the result is stat sig, which seems highly unlikely. In any case this chart shows that their result is not clinically significant. Also, they threw out 46 blood level outliers. With such a weak result including them might have changed the outcome.

If you then scroll the image down to part B you will see the error bars touch, which would indicate p = .05, not p <.01 as they claim there.

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Read the entire paper before commenting. You are either lying or missed important information.

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It is a very involved paper. The conclusions that I drew from it were that higher levels of B1 in the blood were associated with worse cognitive performance, but do you think that it proved that correlation was causation?

It didn't (to me) state that supplementing with B1 had negative effects.

It stated that:

"The cortical atrophy and pronounced functional reorganization associated with B1, contrarily, was more in line with the theory of a disturbed B1 metabolism in older adults, leading to B1 utilization deficits, and thus, an effective B1 deficiency in the brain, despite normal to high-normal blood levels."

It may be that the super large amounts of thiamine that PwP's are taking eradicate the thiamine deficiency in the brain and thus might enhance cognition.

It also may be that those eating diets resulting in high amounts of B1 in the blood may be damaging their brain in other ways.

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see also my comment just above

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