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How to become a "Positive Deviant" (REDUX)

How to become a "Positive Deviant" (REDUX)

For MBA and others hoping to 'positively' influence the course of their PD:

The Study: bastyr.edu/news/general-new...

Presentation REDUX: vimeo.com/191664871

Recent Slides (pdf): google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q...

Outcome (roadmap): bastyrpdschool.org/s/MDS201...

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PD. Too many references for a Sunday Morning! Have you managed to distil the essence of these slides and presentations yet? Do they provide an answer to the key question or are they simply exploring possibilities? I was saying to a fellow poster this morning that in many ways the whole thing is still a mystery to me. For instance, I was thinking about my parents today who did and do little exercise, eat improperly and of course are considerably older than I, but no PD in sight! Why a disease would manifest itself in a fairly athletic, more diet conscious younger man (that's me) seems bizarre at times. I will - being serious - explore the references above but would be interested in any early conclusions you draw. Best.

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Jeeves, I'd suggest you scroll down and click: 'Outcome' (RE diet, exercise, supps)

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BTW I too was always far more 'athletic' than my parents which brought me into contact with some toxic environmental factors (herbicides).

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You just nailed it.

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Same here. I've been a long-distance runner and a nutrition buff my whole life and here I am. Our environmental exposures have been different than our parents.

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Look carefully how our wheat and other small grains are produced now with Roundup used as a preharvest desiccant.

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I think that one of the causes of developing PD which the medical community is constantly ignoring is stress. If for example someone is doing job where he is overloaded or he has to undertake his assignments under tight schedule for years, he is likely to develop it

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I totally agree with you. This a kind of job I have.

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Yes. My first twitches began when I was overloaded at work, my wife and I had baby twins and moved into an old house that needed renovation. I think these and poor nutrition due to Omeprazole was when my system broke down 😕

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I think too much stress puts a strain on our immune system. You were trying to cope with the mental stress of work overload, the physical and emotional stress of baby twins, and the physical & mental stress of moving into a new house. I assume you were also not getting enough sleep at the time, compromising your body's repair and recharge time. I don't know how old the house was, but I can't help but wonder what kinds of toxins you were exposed to renovating at a time when your immune system was running on fumes. Lead in paints? Bags or bottles containing pesticides? Asbestos? I believe that my Parkinson's was triggered by contaminants in a house and its surrounding soil that husband & I moved into in 1986. Environmentally-linked PD seems to occur either with long-term exposure to small doses of toxic substances or a massive, short-term hit.

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Right on !

I developed PD after like 14 years of professional harassment by a pervert director, and many trials in court (that I all won). After a while, I first lost my sense of smell...

By the way, there are PubMeds on the subject.

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There is always a possibility that your parents have MTHFR polymorphisms which could be heterozygous (+- each) but you may have hit a genetic jackpot and got a variant gene from each of them (++) which is homozygous MTHFR, therefore increasing chances of PD.

Having said that I have heterozygous MTHFR, but was raised in a heavily polluted industrial city in one of the former communist countries. On top of this exposure, my doting mother (who by the way was a physician) used to take me for some fresh air outside the city, but that part of the country had overabundance of mosquitoes and at times she used DDT as an insect repellent. So, I attribute my PD diagnosis to this fact and also stress factors of my son's illness a few years ago. At that time I also was diagnosed with Lyme and treated with antibiotics which certainly affected microbiome and contributed as well.

Lately research is pointing out that epigenetics (our genetic interaction with environment) is the real culprit in degenerative diseases, because there are cases when people are exposed to same environmental toxins, (ex. toxic mold), and some get sick, while others don't. So, we just have to play genetic cards we were given the best we can.

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*TRANSLATION: Both genes and environment may play a role in our present state of health.

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My family Also used DDT liberally. I always wondered if it had something to do with my Parkinson.

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Cheers PD.

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Indeed. I’ve been a participant in Dr. Mishley’s data collection as I am with 23 and Me and I agree with her that the data is already out there, i.e., we could do better if we could connect the dots better.

Clearly, there are some PWP that are doing better than others and a few have even stabilized their condition. It’s not a coincidence that these folks end up with very similar regimes. We gather information by correlating anecdotes and following leads we read on Parkinson’s forums which necessarily involves wading through an endless stream of wishful thinking and wives tale’s (ugh,) while Dr. Mishley’s collecting data in an organized way. Makes sense to me.

Thank you, again, PD for sharing.

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Excellent video. Good post, mate.

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The thing I've taken away from this study is that you CAN and ought to exercise every day. There seems to have been an eternal debate on this site re. whether to have 'rest days' or not. Now I know that this isn't the case. I also am interested that 30 minutes seems to be a decent amount (I often do 50 minutes cycling etc). One reference that I couldn't really understand was that of melatonin. It's identified as an issue but I couldn't really understand the associated sentences that tried to place it into context. I mean, if we all struggle with sleep what choices do we have other than to revert to supplements that might alleviate the problem?

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From what I remember of Melatonin was that it was thought people did worse on it, but these people are taking Melatonin as they are desperate for sleep.

I am a bit on the fence. It didn't seem to help me with sleep and if anything my dreams were more lurid.

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I suspect that any variance in advantages gained - whether 30 minutes daily, 45-60 minutes every other day, or similar routine with a couple rest days p/wk worked in - are minuscule as long as the routine is 'vigorous' and consistent. One advantage that the 'daily' routine may have, however, may lie with the 'muscle memory' factor and the 'use it or lose it' rule that applies at an accelerated pace with PD.

In my case, it's clear that 2-3 days of inactivity increases that 'stranger within my own body' sensation and it takes a few minutes of clumsy 'recalibration' (whether jogging, biking, or stair-climbing) before communication channels between brain and muscles are adequately firing again...

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Laurie Mischley's study is like a breath of fresh air. The "pragmatic results" of her preliminary findings are informative.

healthunlocked.com/api/redi...

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Wow. Good spot. The weird thing is how turkey seems such a positive and chicken such a negative. I think they may be comparing lean turkey breast with KFC (and the fries that come with it!)

"Because poor sleep has been associated with PD progression,

an exploratory analyses was performed to differentiate the impact of insomnia from melatonin, a common treatment for insomnia. The association with the melatonin went away after adjusting for insomnia."

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And the other takeaway is that exercise is by far the best thing you can do with PD.

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Couple points.

Chickens from 1970s have nothing to do with chickens from 2018. They have less nutrients, they grow up within weeks as opposed to months, they are different animals. They are eating GMO grain unless they are organic. I believe that half life of glyphosate is 22 years. To harvest wheat and other grains they spray the crop with Roundup so it can dry up and make for easier harvesting

involvement of melatonin is in extra sleep and it also acts as a very potent antioxidant in your brain. That is a huge Plus.

GMOs present another problem. greenmedinfo.com/blog/dark-...

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Do you mean to tell me that my 5 lb chicken from Costco is not normal?

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The video is excellent. Thank-you

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If you would like to participate in dr.Laurie M.. Study click on the link below bastyr.edu/research/studies...

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Thanks for posting this link to the study. I already filled mine out and am glad I did. Here is the link to the article she co-wrote...it may be posted already, but I didn't see it.

hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2...

My goal is to get in to see her in 2018 and drag my advanced PD friend with me. Dr. Farias is next on the list. I want to see if I can volunteer or do an internship with him. So much to learn! Keep calm and educate yourself on!

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A point not to be overlooked is how she hashes out that nigral cells are rich in iron which basically turns to rust when the balance of antioxidants is low compared to the level of oxidative stress. As parkies are inherently glutathione deficient, we can possibly get a clue as to how the cascade begins now. Plus creating an environment that is toxic to fragile mitochondria. Maybe? Thoughts?

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Take a look at Laurie's peer reviewed publication. It doesn't cover exercise, but it does detail dietary and supplement effects on PD progression. hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2...

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