Parkinson's Movement
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This site is saying I have not introduced myself, so here goes. I am trying to help my hubby, I myself do not have PD. He cannot type and does not do computers, does not want to learn how at 69 years of age. He was working at construction just 2 years ago, but had to retire since the stiffness and other problems are making it impossible to continue his work which included using fine motor skills like like wiring , plumbing, climbing around a lot. He found out in April of last year that his symptoms' shuffling, stiffness, tiny handwriting, years of constipation and tremor are all indicative of PD. He has not been to a doctor so far and is trying to do Mucuna and exercise. He is depressed and really down a lot of the time. The bean powder does help some, but I think he is not taking enough or maybe not often enough. We are just in process of learning how to go about living with this. I have my own challenge having breast cancer. I really love this site. It is a treasure trove of very helpful info. I hope to learn a lot of helpful things to make PD progression stop or even turn around.

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See my post titled Regimen. Tell your husband that a retired 69 yo member of this family of Parkies is also at times depressed and down a lot. I am on oxygen 24hrs a day so my activity (horse back riding) is non-existent. I had to sell our horses as my Parkinson's progressed. I am happy when I share experience herein. See my other posts while you view this site.

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I would strongly recommend he sees a doctor. Presumably you've seen someone - possibly a neurologist? - if he has a diagnosis. This isn't really a condition that lends itself to Do-it-Yourself, certainly not later on. This site is fantastic but I would suggest you need professional input. I look on my medical people as being in a partnership with me - they advise, but I am in charge of this and I make the final decision on the course of action.

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How to proceed.

1) Go to a Doctor that specializes in Parkinson's.

2) Take the meds he RX

3) Give the meds time to work

4) Keep a diary of every thing he takes and anything that is different about his behavier.

5) When he has had some improvement and he will then try some "natural" treatment.

If he is like most PWP (people with Parkinson's) in the early stage he will get almost completely relief of his symptoms.

I am 63 in my 11th year and my meds (along with exercise) give me complete relief of my PD 90% of the time.

PD is not a death sentence just a bump in the road.

He is just normal to be depressed just part of the healinf process. He will get the why me. Anger will come. Acceptness then resolve to beat PD. After 11 years i am still getting all these emotions just part of life.

The best med for most people is carbidopa levodopa.

Good luck.

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Seeing a doctor is absolutely necessary!

But beside Mucuna, you can also try sublingual B12 lozenges. Deficiency of B12 can lead to neurological symptoms and as we age most of us develop shortage of B12 because of GIF (gastric intrinsic factor) insufficiency especially vegeterians.

You can also try to sign up your husband at Clinicrowd.com and start Mannitol regimen. Mannitol is a form of sugar which is available on Amazon, is approved by FDA, and very inexpensive. Watch the website videos first to understand what it is all about to make an informed decision.

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Faridaro, I was researching this mannitol, ( though the link does not work). This is pretty exciting. I keep stopping in the middle of my work and and reading all this news. Thanks for pointing this out. My sisters husband has had PD for about 11 years and can only sit and shake. He is very dependent on others even to feed him. Another man in our church here is also a very sad case and he can hardly walk or talk, to help him move, someone backs in front of him kind of pulling him along. It is no wonder we are scared and my husband is fighting depression and hopelessness. He is not a person who is into reading himself, or researching anything. He was always into his work and now that he can't do that, it's pretty sad. That is why I am so fascinated with this website here. I sort of stumbled across it because of the John Pepper book.

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As others here have said, your husband needs to see a Neurologist who specialises in PD and movement disorders. (How you do that depends on what country you are in). Yours husband needs to be unmedicated for his first Neuro appointment. If he does have PD, he should be prescribed drugs which will help his movement enough for him to follow a PD-specific excercise plan. Makes sure he also gets PD-specific advice about walking, diet, constipation etc, etc.

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Thanks for the input. We have been in e-mail correspondence with a doctor who himself had PD. He is sure my hubby has PD from his symptoms. Also my sis, whose husband has PD and others have confirmed this. We did not even suspect it ourselves. You know the , "it couldn't possible happen to us" attitude. I would try to coach my husband as to how to walk to pick up his feet and plant his heel down firmly instead of shuffling along. No, he has not seen a doctor. How do you find one? He has never gone to doctors in his life, unless it was an emergency like cutting of his thumb. He does not have insurance now, but he really does need to go to one if he needs the meds. I just today received some Selegiline I ordered from an anti-aging site. I did read all the warnings and he took just 2.5 mgs to start with. Will increase slowly if it shows no harmful effects. We were thinking along with the Mucuna bean powder it should help him.

He does have the mask-like expression, the softening of his voice, the very slow movements. Difficulties with lying down in bed and getting the covers on, buttoning his shirts, on and on. It was so clear once we were told. The worst is the sleep problems. I really need to find help for him with sleep issues. We are both getting behind in sleep.

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He definitely needs to see a neurologist specialized in "movement disorders".

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It is very important that he see a Neurological Doctor. My husband has PD and is well controlled with that help. Sleep was a very big problem, but with the help of Lorazepam and Paxil he sleeps great. This régime take a while to get hold, but works great for him. SEE A DOCTOR, not only for him but for your wellness.

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I think the most important thing you can do for him is to try to get him interested in learning about PD and how he can help himself control it. You should not mother him. He does seem to be in such bad shape already though. He will do better if he realizes he has to exercise in some way every day. If he could learn a new skill like learning to use the internet to find out about his disease and his new job (new job is "living with PD") he will do better. Give him tough love and you will have more time to yourself as well. Make him read the comments and posts on this site and talk about them. There are a lot of men on this site who are doing well that he can learn from. If he can't read the posts you can read them to him.

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Great advice if I can put it in practice! I have a very hard time "making" my hubby do anything he does not want to do. I have been trying very hard to get him motivated. It just will take some time.

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I don't have much time this morning because we are leaving in a few hours for a week. Maybe you could try to get him connected with other PD people in your area. Check the internet to see if there is a Rock Steady Boxing affiliate he can join or a Pedaling for Parkinsons class. Google Parkinsons Support Groups too. Try playing music like the you tube videos that have been on this site the last few days. Music might help him. Once I realized that PD Control was my new job it helped me a lot.

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Autumn, if you husband is not into reading (mine has dyslexia so I understand that part very well), there are many videos on youtube regarding PD issues done by professionals and PD patients some of which are doing very well. May be watching those videos will help your husband to get positive and hopeful attitude.

Regarding sleep - you can try Melatonin which helps to fall asleep but not to stay asleep, (especially if you take it with a little bit of wine). Just start on a small dose, may be 1 mg and increase if necessary. Also, there are many herbal remedies that can help - valerian is one of my favorite although the smell is horrible, but if your husband have diminished sense of smell as many PD patients do, he may not even notice it. Sleep Tonight! by Enzymatic Therapy was very helpful for my adult son who had sleep issues. There are many other similar products which you can find on Amazon and see reviews. I would try those first before going on any sleep prescription medication which can be addictive and have side effects.

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I totally agree with you. I have the melatonin and valerian and we do try it. The smell does not bother us. The valerian sometimes works. It's partly the constantly getting up to go to the bathroom. How do PwP handle that? I am sure it is common problem.

My husband does have dyslexia also. He loves viewing videos, but for some reason has been resistant to watching anything about PD. It depresses him. I think it is getting better about it though. The hopeful ones I have been finding on here interest him. Thanks for the tips.

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Your husband needs to see a neurologist and get on medication. For one thing he needs anti-depressants. depression is a part of Parkinson's. Please find a neurologist now. Where do you live?

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There is loads of stuff that might help, but everyone is different. What helped me was coconut oil, mannitol ( which will get rid of his constipation and then some and I find really helps sleep). Also liposomal gluthione might help, but it is expensive. Also turmeric and exercise.

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