King David had PD; so what?


Last week I was asked to present the argument and utilitarian purpose for King David having had Parkinson's disease. I consented as I have been working on this for over 2 years. I thought you might have some interest as we all work our way through our Altered Prism of Perspective. Regardless of your religious beliefs, King David wrote the ultimate verses of consolation years before we ever heard of Kubler Ross. Enjoy, forward, and comment as you see appropriate.

Selyov, aka voyles backwards

10 Replies

  • Very interesting study and support for this case. It has encouraged me and given me a new view on my purpose as I deal with the disease. May the Lord keep your message going strong and your intent to show the faith exhibited by David in his trials.

  • A very fun and enlightening presentation! For an amateur bible scholar, historian, and author writing in Englsh, I think you have done a darn good job of demonstrating that King David had Parkinson's, or something very like it. And, as a free bonus, we listeners have the chance to add three new 10-dollar words to our vocabulary, and savor the hint of a new backstory for "the Star of David' (details to be supplied elsewhere?)

  • The details are provided in two of my books. What started this was the "star of David" on the façade of Basilica of Santa Croce; To me, there was a Jewish star on the front of a Catholic basilica. What gives! The answer is best told in my book Midnight in Florence where I encountered the Jewish architect from the 1860s. A snippet is in the Hitler book , Parkinson's man of evil. All three of my books are free on Kindle today and tomorrow. The easiest way to get them is to tap into my website WWW.CRVOYLES.COM What you don't know, you don't see. Once you see, you can never be blinded. History hides its secrets in full view

  • Thank you, Doctor Voyles. If I don't have a Kindle or an ebook reader, can I open the files on my desktop Macintosh?

  • Dumpelkin,

    go to your app store and look for Kindle reader. I have been reading off of my Apple iPad for years. I assume the desktop will work also.


    PS: if you run into trouble, go to Google.

  • I really enjoyed your talk thank you.

  • Do you think Leah,s weak eyes are a result of down syndrome?

  • Hal,

    You are an interesting character and I enjoyed the sunscreen and your note about Downton Abbey.

    I assume you’re serious about Leah. According to my preferred version of Genesis (the New Living Translation, as I am a relative simpleton), she had no “sparkle in her eye.” Her sister Rachel was gorgeous. If one were to take a pareidolic perspective, one might conclude that there was something wrong with Leah besides a bad case of “the uglies.” However the case for Down syndrome is fairly weak.

    Number 1: Down syndrome would have been more likely to have occurred in the younger daughter (Rachel) rather than the older (Leah).

    Number 2: 50% of women with Down syndrome have ovulatory problems; Leah had 6 children.

    Number 3: The offspring of Down syndrome have a 35 to 50% chance of yielding genetically disordered children. No report in Leah's children.

    If your question is a tease, you got me.


  • No, I didn't mean to offend but I always wondered what it meant by weak eyes. The book was contrasting looks and the first thing you notice about Downs is the eyes. God blessed Leah with lots of healthy children, I don't have to tell you about Sarah. Rachel just 2.

  • I enjoyed your book and now I enjoyed seeing you in person on your video. Thanks for sharing all your thoughts with us and challenging us with your unique perspective. Best of all, thanks for reminding us that living with hope is healthy - a lesson those of us with PD really need on a daily basis. God bless you.

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