Parkinson's Movement
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Struggling

I'm Beckie, I don't have Parkinsons but had a stroke and when I came out of my coma, I couldn't walk but have had lots of therapy, but still have the Parkinson stutter. I'm on a lot of Sinemet several times a day. Can any one tell me if Sinemet works for them?

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I do not believe stutter is one of the Parkinson's disease symptoms.

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Hi Beckie,

First of all, it appears that levodopa therapy is good for stroke patients:

Levodopa improves procedural motor learning in chronic stroke patients.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/187...

Here is an article you may find interesting:

Stuttering-like Dysfluencies in the Speech of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

"While stuttered speech may be a relatively minor symptom of PD, the presence of stuttering in these individuals can be an important characteristic to observe for diagnostic purposes."

This article can only be downloaded to your computer then you can read it. The first article at the top of the page is the article and just click on it and it will download. It is an easy read with large text.

google.com/search?q=Stutter...

Rich

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Beckie, I don't have a stutter. But i can tell you that Sinemet was effective in controlling my tremor for the 2 years that I used it. A single pill of 25/100 CD/LD would last up to about 3 hours after I had taken it.

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Hi Abby. Sinemet does not do anything to slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson's. It is not designed to change anything, but it is designed to mask one or two of the symptoms. I would assume that your neurologist thinks that the sinemet will mask your stutter. It will do nothng to improve your walk. Your walking problems can be overcome by using your conscious brain to control your walk. I think that consciously focusing on what you want to say could possibly overcome your stutter but I could not be sure of this, I would have to try it out on you.

Would you like to make contact with me? If so, go to my website reverseparkinsons.net and I will come back to you immediately. I do not charge for what I do.

Good luck!

John

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John

Are you saying that conscious walking will reverse hemiplegia cause by stroke?.

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Hi Hikoi. Where did I say that? If I knew what hemiplegia was I could maybe answer your question.

John

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John

Above your advice ro Abby she has had a stroke causing walking problems

Hemiplegia is paralysis of one side of the body. Hemiparesis is weakness of one side of the body and is less severe than hemiplegia. Both are a common side effect of stroke .

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Hi Hikoi. I don't claim that consciously controlling the way we walk will reverse anything, not even Pd. I encourage patients to do fast walking, because that can and does reverse some of the symptoms of Pd. But if patients are unable to walk properly, they will not be able to reverse their symptoms, but if they were able to learn how to 'consciously' control their walking, they would then be able to do the fast walking and get the benefit from it.

I hope this clears this up for you.

John

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Gosh no No it's not really clear from your answer but it is not important to continue this..

Your book is called "Reverse Parkinsons " isn't it? :)

I was just curious that you stated to Abbey that her "walking problems can be overcome by using your conscious brain to control your walk" I was simply asking if you believe your method can teach stroke patients to walk too.

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Hi Hikoi. That is an interesting thought. Dr Doidge mentioned in his first book that scientists have found that if a stroke patient, who is affected by the stroke on one side of the body, and the 'good' side is disabled by preventing it from moving, then the brain very quickly finds new pathways to overcome the stroke injury. I hope I have put this properly.

If the patient tries to use the bad side and is unable to use the good side, then the brain sets up a new pathway to achieve this. It takes about six week to normalise and can be done a anytime after the stroke. It does not have to be done immediately afterwards.

I have recently been able to show a lady, who had a brain tumour removed from the frontal lobe, how tosuccessfully walk properly. Don't ask me how or why, because it did not make sense to me. he frontal lobe is what we use to consciously do anything. Her frontal lobe was injured by the removal of the tumour, so how did the frontal lobe find a new way of helping her to walk normally again

John

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Another diversion.

i imagine a neuro scientist would be able to explain that, I do not understand neuro anatomy.

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Thank u

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I don't have Parkinsons they say it's called Parkinsonism due to my stroke.

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Beckie

There is a stroke support group on here called different strokes. You may like to ask them your question too.

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How do I join that support group?

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At the top is a header my communities, click on it then on browse communities and you will find a search box. Put in stroke and it will come up.

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Thank u!!

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