Steroid therapy (?)

Have any of you noticed improvement in your own symptoms when taking a round of steroid for an acute condition probably accompanied with an antibiotic. I have and I think I may have written here about that in the past. And now I have been prescribed an nasal spray steroid for acute allergy, and I find again an improvement in my symptoms of PD. So, without abusing it why not just continue the once daily puff of nasal steroid per nostril w/o side effects? It would be wonderful from my point of view. I don't even care why it works only that it helps a little bit.  

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  • 1 steroid Parkinson's trial:

    HE3286 as Treatment for Parkinson's Disease: michaeljfox.org/foundation/...

    As for antibiotics, the following have been shown to be neuroprotective or to help the condition of parkinsonian patients:

    Minocycline: neuroprotective mechanisms in Parkinson's disease:

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/149...

    Doxycycline restrains glia and confers neuroprotection in a 6-OHDA Parkinson model:

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/235...

    Ceftriaxone prevents and reverses behavioral and neuronal deficits in an MPTP-induced animal model of Parkinson's disease dementia:

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/254...

    Tuberculosis drug may cure Parkinson's-like illness

    purdue.edu/uns/html3month/2...

    Rifampicin and Parkinson's disease.

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/228...

    Potential of D-cycloserine in the treatment of behavioral and neuroinflammatory disorders in Parkinson's disease and studies that need to be performed before clinical trials.

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/228...

    Treatment of Severe Constipation Improves Parkinson's Disease Symptoms

    cdd.com.au/pdf/publications...

    Movement disorder symptoms are lessened by an antibiotic

    eurekalert.org/pub_releases...

    Were you on any of the above antibiotics?

  • HE3286 seems to be helpful and I wish the co. good luck receiving approval to go to market. In the meantime I intend to use this nasal spray steroid daily so long as it makes me move better and I do not present a negative side effect. You'te real helpful

  • I was on augmentin. Speaking of antibiotics I read recently that the class of antibiotics they call quinolones (CIPRO for one)  are neuro damaging.

  • Well, I found taking ibuprofen got my meds kicking in faster and longer lasting.  I think there was someone else who also had this experience and was taking ibuprofen for children (in liquid form) to stave the long term effect of taking ibuprofen.

  • As below....ibuprofen is an anti inflammatory.

  • Ibuprofen & Parkinson's:  

    hsph.harvard.edu/news/press...

    Aspirin and ibuprofen enhance pyrazinamide treatment of murine tuberculosis.

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/171...

  • Steroids are anti-inflammatory.  PD is definitely inflammatory.  However, one cannot continue on steroids due to their other side effects.  Temporary use only.  We had a strange event recently when my PD husband was hospitalized for kidney failure/sepsis due to a UTI.  After being directed by the 'hospitalist'  to go to hospice to die, we followed contrary advice from his cardiologist who said we should wait for the two antibiotics to work.  After a few days, my husbands voice which was almost non existent, returned to his pre-PD level, clearly enunciating at full volume.  Clear cognitively.  I thought it was some sort of pre-death rally but no, it was not. This continued for 2 1/2 days and then stopped.  All he was getting was 2 antibiotics and. Dextrose drip.  Very weird but nice to talk to him again, even if only for a while.

  • Unless it was one of the above antibiotics I listed above I doubt it was the antibiotics that improved his condition.  I think you should continue using the dextrose because there is a positive relationship with it and Parkinson's:

    google.com/patents/EP246827...

  • Donzim,

    Am I right in thinking that your husband was essentially cured of PD for 2.5 days while only taking "2 antibiotics and Dextrose drip"? If so, there's much that we can learn from this. Does anyone have a theory as to what happened?

    John

  • I guessed since dextrose is a sugar it helped to correct mitochondrial dysfunction and that is the case:

    A Modern Approach to the Treatment of Mitochondrial Disease

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

    "No single protocol is optimal for every mitochondrial disease patient. Dextrose/electrolyte therapy should be considered if a patient is unable to maintain oral fluid intake in the face of a catabolic stressor, including fever, illness, or vomiting. Any underlying infection and fever should be aggressively treated [38, Class III]."

    Other sugars recommended to help correct mitochondrial dysfunction (ribose):

    lifewave.com/pdf/ThetaNutri...

    Both dextrose and ribose are used by weight lifters to help build muscle and what other supplements do weight lifters use to help build muscle?:

    Ubiquinol & weight lifting:

    breakingmuscle.com/nutritio...

    Is ubiquinol good for Parkinson's disease?

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/244...

    Magnesium:

    lifestyleandstrength.com/mu...

    Mg and PD:   ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/147...

    Carnosine and weightlifting: bodybuilding.com/fun/jrod5.htm

    Carnosine & PD:   ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/187...

    And there are more......I just finished a documentary about PD and almost included a section on weightlifting and PD because nearly every weightlifting supplement is good for Parkinson's.  The only component of a weight lifting regimen that is not recommended is a high protein diet.  The protein shakes weight lifters take would interfere with the utility of levodopa.  

    And don't forget to weight lift if you are so inclined:

    webmd.com/parkinsons-diseas...

    Rich

  •  Thanks for posting the above links. Very helpful. Glad to know I am on the right track. I do all of those except L-Carnosine, which I tried and did not perceive a benefit.

  • Steroids affect inflammation, one of the main issues on PD. They carry unfortunate side effects and cannot be taken long term. Don't know about the nasal spray.

  • Buzz1397, my son on Sunday at Kaiser Urgent Care was prescribed Sodium Chloride (OCEAN NASAL) 0.65%.....a steroid, and also Flonase. Both nasal sprays, for heavy duty DIZZINESS. He was NOT given an antibiotic. The MD thought that the dizziness was caused by sinus problems. Today is Thursday (5 days on the Sodium Chloride, 2 days of 2 sprays in each nostril and 3 days of 1 spray in each nostril). Today the dizziness decreased by at least 60%. He suffers from cervical dystonia and the MD thought TMJ. So far I have not seen any decrease in PD symptoms.

    Here is MY QUESTION: You mentioned that you saw no harm on continuing to use the steroid med. Are you still using it? If not why not? Also, are you still on Mucuna ? Thanks!

  • Yes Nasacort 24-hr allergy but not a whole lot of it just 1 puff in each nostril every morning, as prescribed by the internal medicine doctor for my allergies. No problems noted. In the literature is found warnings about cracking bleeding sinuses if it is overused. Yes I am still optimistically using mucuna pruriens, the so-called full spectrum velvet bean in 400 mg capsules. I take one of those whenever I take a half of a 25/100 mg Carbidopa/Levodopa tablet. Moderation is prudent when one does not know a lot except for how one feels. I take new things sometimes just to see how I feel after. The continuation of the Nasacort in moderation feels okay for me. And the capsules of mucuna pruriens seemed to fit in with the Rx C/L so on it goes. As for dizziness, I have a little. Is your son taking a PD Rx that can cause it? My Rx C/L will cause dizziness I know. Sorry to read of your son's problems Good luck.

  • I think using Flonase frequently has side effects you shoould read about.