Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

copied from outside source

Without further ado, the basic Ketogenic diet:

What you’ll need

◾Ketostix available on Amazon.com.

The Diet

Note, you can eat as much of the foods below as you like, but I’ve found that I quickly feel full eating this diet. Don’t overeat and more importantly, don’t under-eat and make sure you’re getting the calories you need to function. This is NOT about cutting calories, it’s about releasing fat reserves and teaching your body to burn them.

Drink lots of water during the diet (but don’t go crazy). I find this helps increase my metal clarity and energy.

Taubes and others recommend not starting an exercise program at the beginning of this diet because during the acclimatization period you will not have enough energy and it usually results in people quitting the diet.

During the diet, measure your rate of fat burn by measuring your acetoacetate output with your Ketostix. Do this every time you visit the loo. You should see 5 to 20 mg/dL, and I’ve noticed it’s particularly high after a very fatty meal. Blood glucose (if your ketostix show this on a separate color tab) should be zero at all times. If it is not zero and above 200 mg/dL you may want to consult your doctor.

One of the most effective tricks during a diet is routine. Eat the same meals over and over or plan your meals ahead for the whole week. I’ve found it effective to pre-make dishes on Sunday and have them ready for the week. That makes it incredibly easy to stick to the diet because I avoid thinking which means I avoid creativity and creativity requires decision making which leads to hard choices. Just avoid the hard choices and have it all planned and some of it ready to grab and go.

The Leafy Green Salad recipe:

This is a recipe for a basic very low carb salad with lots of flavor. It’s great to add to any high-protein, high-fat meal.

◾Spinach, lettuce and/or mustard greens.

◾Red peppers

◾Tomatoes.

◾Optional raw onions.

◾Optional green beans raw.

◾Balsamic vinegar and olive oil dressing with salt and pepper. Use lemon and lime very sparingly if you add it. The vinegar actually reduces the glycemic index of this salad (and other foods).

Below I have outlined three days with a total of 9 meals that you can mix and match as you like. At the end I include a list of Ketogenic-safe ingredients you can add or subtract as you like. Remember the key is to have a high fat, high-protein and no-carb or very low carb diet. That means absolutely no sugar.

◾Day 1 ◾Breakfast: 2 eggs done any way with yolks. Sausage containing no carbs or sugar. Bacon.

◾Lunch: Chicken with as much skin and oily gooey bits as possible. Steamed spinach or broccoli.

◾Supper: Steak with cheese. Fried mushrooms. Leafy green salad.

◾Before bed 1 glass of wine with a slice of cheese.

◾Day 2 ◾Breakfast: 2 egg omlette with friend mushrooms, cheese and chopped parsley.

◾Lunch: A whole duck breast if you can get it or chicken again with as much fatty skin as possible. Leafy green salad.

◾Supper: Hamburger made with high fat mince without the bun. The mince can contain the usual paprika, chopped onions and garlic if you like, but absolutely no syrup or sugar. Add Cheese, tomatoes, lettuce and any other leafy low-carb greens you like.

◾Before bed 1 glass of wine with a slice of cheese.

◾Day 3 ◾2 eggs done any way with bacon and usual no-carb sausage.

◾Steak with cheese. Leafy green salad.

◾Salmon (or other fish) fried and served with Bok Choy and your leafy green salad.

You can mix and match the meals above and get a good Ketogenic burn going where you will notice rapid weight loss.

Eat as much as you want ingredient ideas:

◾Beef,

◾Steak,

◾Hamburger,

◾Prime Rib,

◾Filet Mignon,

◾Roast Beef,

◾Chicken,

◾Duck (awesome if you can get it because it is very high fat),

◾Any Fish, Tuna, Salmon, Trout, Halibut,

◾Lamb,

◾Pork,

◾Bacon,

◾Ham,

◾Eggs,

◾Shrimp,

◾Crab,

◾Lobster,

◾Butter,

◾Oils (Olive Oil, Flaxseed oil, etc.),

◾Salt, Pepper, Soy Sauce,

◾Spinach,

◾Lettuce,

◾Mustard Greens,

◾Celery,

◾Cheeses,

◾Oysters,

◾Abalone.

Add for variety but in moderation:

Read the ingredients (if applicable) and make darn sure they contain no sugar:

◾Avocadoes

◾Mustard (with no sugar or carbs),

◾Tea no sugar with milk

◾Coffee black no sugar

◾Heavy Cream

◾Broccoli,

◾Cabbage,

◾Bok Choy,

◾Kale,

◾Asparagus,

◾Mushrooms,

◾Cucumbers,

◾Olives,

◾Celery,

◾Green Beans,

◾Brussel Sprouts,

◾Peppers (Red, Green, Jalapeno, Habanero),

◾Onions,

◾Nuts preferably almonds,

You absolutely must avoid all sugar on this diet because it is the highest GI carbohydrate that will very quickly spike your insulin and destroy any Ketogenic effect. Other foods to avoid roughly in order of damage they will do to the diet:

◾All sugar.

◾All Bread.

◾Did I mention avoid sugar?

◾All traditional carbs like rice, pasta, wheat, potatoes, even the low GI ones like beans and lentils.

◾Beware of sauces that contain sugar or things like corn starch.

Effects of the diet:

◾You will see rapid weight loss of up to 6 pounds for a 200 pound person in the first 48 hours. This is your kidneys releasing water as they expel their sodium due to the absence of insulin. It’s what you’ve usually heard described as “water weight”.

◾Then you should see continued weight loss of anything from 0.25 to 2 pounds per day (an eighth to half kilo lost per day). But this varies greatly between individuals and is affected by a wide range of factors including your current weight and insulin sensitivity.

◾For the first week you may experience slightly decreased mental clarity. This clears up after a week as your brain gets used to burning ketones for energy instead of glucose.

◾According to data in “Why we get fat” your Vitamin C needs actually decrease on a low carb diet, so don’t feel the need to massively supplement.

◾Research has shown (also from Taubes) that LDL (bad) cholesterol will elevate slightly but clump size will be increased which is a net positive because larger LDL is less likely to stick to artery walls. HDL (good) cholesterol is significantly elevated with a very low carb diet like this which is a very strong net positive. This also has other great health benefits e.g. Lower insulin reduces the risk of hardening of artery walls.

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  • Thank you very much. Good guidelines; easy to follow.

  • @ pedserv

    Modified diet - site.matthewsfriends.org/in...

  • Doesn't all this protein interfere with the absorption of PD medication?

  • That is what they say

  • Hello RoyProp

    HealthSeeker7 is right to ask if this high protein diet will adversely affect the absorption of your medication. I think it will and the benefits you are seeing now may not be sustained over the long term and you might experience health deficits too. If anyone else reads this thread I implore them to read other diets in order to get a balance on things.

    May I suggest you look at Professor Colin T Campbell's video's on YouTube and view what he has to say about too much protein the diet as gleaned from experiments.

    It is easy to be taken in by the thought of eating juicy steaks, bacon and the like, but you should research the long term effects. Also, animal products lack fibre and I would think it would not exactly help if you suffer with constipation either.

    Please do your research before embarking on a diet such as this one.

    Regards

    Norton

  • I take no medication.

    I do not have constipation.

    I eat a single small serving of meat at noon and a single small serving of meat at evening meat.

    Low carbohydrate diet and near normal diet with the exception the portion size is smaller than the typical American

    I do not consider this diet excessively or abnormally high in meat.

    No sugar.

  • And you have been diagnosed about one year i believe. It makes a difference knowing this, my life with Parkinsdons was quite different at one year then at 6 years.

  • @ Hikoi

    copy from other

    His quote: His experience:

    “When I was first diagnosed, I went through different mental stages...disbelieve, fear, depression, apathy, anger...etc. The most important thing is to have a Neurologist who works with Parkinson's patients regularly. I left two behind before I found one with a working knowledge of PD. Same with my General Practioner, I changed twice before getting someone who would work with the Neurologist and take the time to keep abreast of PD treatments. I travel 75 miles one way to my Neurologist, but it is well worth it. He is a research Professor in movement disorders at a teaching hospital. You and your husband need to find the right medical professionals for you.

    My neurologist told me it is difficult to estimate the rate of progression until at least 5 years of history is available. Then they can chart the future as it is based on the rate establish in those first 5 years. I am 63 years old today. I am looking forward to some more good years ahead.”

    ENDITEM

  • I do not agree with Professor Colin T Campbell's vegan lifestyle

  • RoyProp

    I do not propose to get in an argument with you over the diet you are following, what you do is obviously your concern. You may not agree with Professor Colin T Campbell's vegan lifestyle, but that is not my point. Let me clarify what I was saying. In some animal experiments, researchers fed the subjects a diet comprising of 20% protein and after a period of time all succumbed to cancer. When another set of subjects were fed a diet comprising 5% of the diet all were still alive after the same period of time. I wish anybody considering following a high protein diet to first do their research before embarking on it.

    This is all I am going to say on the matter.

  • BEST web sites:

    site.matthewsfriends.org/in... Modified Ketone Diet

    tending-the-iris.us/coconut...

    lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/w...

    eatingacademy.com/nutrition...

    What are the consequences of choice in: DIET, treatment options, traditional meds, alternatives, coconut oil

    What do you have to lose? Your personal choice is personal.

    Confirming my earlier research.

    copy

    In particular, people with dementia were significantly less likely to survive over a six-year period.

    Allison Willis, M.D., and her colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine examined the health records of over 29 million Medicare beneficiaries with Parkinson’s.

    They identified 138,000 individuals who were diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2002 and followed their medical charts through 2008. [ 6 years ]

    Results

    •64 percent of people with Parkinson’s died DURING the six-year study.

    •After adjusting the data for age, race, and sex, people with Parkinson’s had a nearly four times greater risk of death than people with no disease and nearly double the risk of death than for those living with other common diseases such as colorectal cancer, stroke and ischemic heart disease. People with Parkinson’s had nearly the same risk of death as those who had experienced a heart attack or suffered a hip fracture.

    / enditem

    reference:

    pdf.org/en/science_news/rel...

  • I don’t know anything about this diet, except that I think the purpose is to encourage the body to make ketones, which can cross the brain barrier and nourish the brain. I also believe that coconut oil helps the body produce ketones as well.

    What I do know is that 3 months ago I put 2 tablespoons of Coconut Oil (CO) in a breakfast smoothie and felt a burst of energy that I had not felt for years. Fatigue had been my constant companion and the change was startling! I have continued to put 2 tablespoons of CO in a smoothie everyday since then with the most unexpected results imaginable. The majority of my PD symptoms are improved or reversed. I can easily brush my teeth and button my pants. I walk faster and talk louder. I haven’t taken a nap in 3 months. I work hours everyday in my 2 acre hillside property pulling a wagon full of tools up and down the steep driveway. I FEEL FABULOUS! All of my family and friends have expressed amazement at the very noticeable improvement.

    I got my sister, who has Alzheimer’s on CO and she also experienced dramatic improvement within days. She was previously completely withdrawn and seldom interacted with her family. Within the first 4 days she was engaging in conversation and even went out to a restaurant and movie. On day 4, she rearranged the furniture in her room! I can once again speak to her by phone and she sounds the way she did 15 years ago.

    I do not know why it made such a dramatic change in my life, and my sister's life, but it did. I encourage others with PD or Alzheimer’s to try Coconut Oil to see if it can help. I did not expect the results I got, but I’m thrilled and so is my loving family.

    FYI: I'm 65, and was diagnosed in Jan 2001. I'm 5' 4 " and have weighed within a few pounds, up or down of 110 lbs since I was 21. I don't know if that is significant for dosing or not. I just randomly chose 2 tablespoons of CO and got lucky.

  • Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers screening blood tests for cholesterol, lipid, and triglyceride levels every 5 years. These screening tests help detect conditions that may lead to a heart attack or stroke. You pay nothing for the test.

  • io9.com/what-you-should-kno...

    Though it was originally developed to treat patients with epilepsy, interest in the ketogenic diet has taken off in recent years as we've learned more about its therapeutic and health benefits. Here’s what you need to know about ‘keto’ and why some health experts believe it's good for your body — especially your brain.

    Ketones are acidic chemicals that include acetone, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate. Needless to say, this can lead to some serious problems; starvation is obviously not good! If left unchecked, ketones can increase blood acidity, which can affect urine and cause serious liver and kidney damage.

    But, when done correctly and responsibly, the keto diet can be used to effectively treat a number of health conditions.

    A keto diet can take on many forms, but it typically involves the restriction of carbohydrates to no more than 50g per day. Sources should typically come from whole foods like vegetables, nuts, dairy, and so on. Refined carbohydrates, like bagels, pasta, and cereals, should be avoided, as should refined sugars (including high-sugar fruits and fruit juices).

    Meals, therefore, should mostly be comprised of protein and some healthy fats (like olive oil, coconut oil, and avocados). A good rule of thumb is to follow the 60/35/5 rule in which 60% of calories come from fat, 35% from protein, and 5% from carbs. Protein should be set at about 1.5 to 1.75g of protein for every kilogram of your ideal body weight.

    For comparison, a typical Western diet is about 5-15% protein, 10-20 % fat, and 65-85% carbohydrates.

    It’s also important to not overdo the protein; a high-protein diet may prevent the body from entering into ketosis. Also, this is not a form of intermittent fasting

    Why it works

    Actually, we’re not entirely sure why it works so well. But some theories are beginning to emerge.

    Keto diets have beneficial effects in a broad range of neurological disorders, particularly those involving the death of neurons. Scientists think it may have something to do with the effects of cellular energetics.

    As already noted, the keto diet is associated with increased circulation of ketones in the body, which is a more efficient fuel for the brain. Ketones may also increase the number of brain mitochondria — the power packs inside of cells.

    It’s possible that the boosted energy production capacity created by these effects is what gives our neurons an enhanced ability to resist metabolic challenges. Other biochemical changes — namely ketosis, high fat levels, and low glucose levels — may contribute to neuronal protection through a number of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

    The keto diet is being increasingly considered for the treatment of many neurological diseases and injuries, a list that includes Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, stroke, and even traumatic brain injuries. The keto diet can also improve memory function in older adults with increased risk for Alzheimer’s.

    Cancer

    The keto diet may also help in fighting off certain types of cancer and various tumors. It seems to do a good job treating brain tumors, likely a consequence of its neuroprotective qualities.

    In one case, it seems to have helped an elder woman mange her brain tumor. It can also work well in conjunction with radiation therapy to treat brain tumor cells — at least in mice. Some scientists believe that a restricted keto diet is “a viable alternative to the standard care for managing malignant brain cancer.”

    A 2011 pilot study indicated that the ketogenic diet is suitable for even advanced cancer patients, claiming that “It has no severe side effects and might improve aspects of quality of life and blood parameters in some patients with advanced metastatic tumors."

  • ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The present study shows the beneficial effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. It significantly reduced the body weight and body mass index of the patients. Furthermore, it decreased the level of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose, and increased the level of HDL cholesterol. Administering a ketogenic diet for a relatively longer period of time did not produce any significant side effects in the patients. Therefore, the present study confirms that it is safe to use a ketogenic diet for a longer period of time than previously demonstrated.

    ENDITEM

    webmd.com/diet/high-protein...

    What Are the Risks Linked to High Protein, Low-Carb Diets?

    High protein, low-carb diets can cause a number of health problems, including:

    Kidney failure. Consuming too much protein puts a strain on the kidneys, which can make a person susceptible to kidney disease.

    High cholesterol . It is well known that high-protein diets (consisting of red meat, whole dairy products, and other high fat foods) are linked to high cholesterol. Studies have linked high cholesterol levels to an increased risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and cancer.

    Osteoporosis and kidney stones. High-protein diets have also been shown to cause people to excrete a large amount of calcium in their urine. Over a prolonged period of time, this can increase a person's risk of osteoporosis and kidney stones. A diet that increases protein at the expense of a very restrictive intake of plant carbohydrates may be bad for bones, but not necessarily a high-protein intake alone.

    Cancer. One of the reasons high-protein diets increase the risks of certain health problems is because of the avoidance of carbohydrate-containing foods and the vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants they contain. It is therefore important to obtain your protein from a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Not only are your needs for protein being met, but you are also helping to reduce your risk of developing cancer.

    Unhealthy metabolic state (ketosis). Low-carb diets can cause your body to go into a dangerous metabolic state called ketosis since your body burns fat instead of glucose for energy. During ketosis, the body forms substances known as ketones, which can cause organs to fail and result in gout, kidney stones, or kidney failure. Ketones can also dull a person's appetite, cause nausea and bad breath. Ketosis can be prevented by eating at least 100 grams of carbohydrates a day.

    ENDITEM

  • "The keto diet is being increasingly considered for the treatment of many neurological diseases and injuries, a list that includes Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, stroke, and even traumatic brain injuries. The keto diet can also improve memory function in older adults with increased risk for Alzheimer’s."

    What are the consequences of choice in treatment options: DIET, traditional meds, alternatives, coconut oil, ultrasound surgery?

    What do you have to lose? Your personal choice is personal.

    Confirming my earlier research.

    copy

    In particular, people with dementia were significantly less likely to survive over a six-year period.

    Allison Willis, M.D., and her colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine examined the health records of over 29 million Medicare beneficiaries with Parkinson’s.

    They identified 138,000 individuals who were diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2002 and followed their medical charts through 2008. [ 6 years ]

    Results

    •64 percent of people with Parkinson’s died DURING the six-year study.

    •After adjusting the data for age, race, and sex, people with Parkinson’s had a nearly four times greater risk of death than people with no disease and nearly double the risk of death than for those living with other common diseases such as colorectal cancer, stroke and ischemic heart disease. People with Parkinson’s had nearly the same risk of death as those who had experienced a heart attack or suffered a hip fracture.

    / enditem

    reference:

    pdf.org/en/science_news/rel...

  • site.matthewsfriends.org/in...

    There has been a lot of speculation on whether the Ketogenic diet may be effective in other neurological disorders; a small amount of research is starting to appear. We have a Mum on site trying Keto for her child with a brain tumor, already seeing improvement!

    Who knows what the future may be, perhaps Alzheimer’s patients being treated with Atkins or MCT, or Motor neuron disease patients treated with Ketocal!

  • Modified Adkins Diet

    site.matthewsfriends.org/up...

    This diet induces ketosis without fluid, calorie, protein restrictions, nor the need for fasting, food weighing or hospitalization (hospital w/classic keto diet). All 28 patients on the diet for at least one week became ketotic. 21 (75%) reported large (80 to 160 mg/dL) urinary ketosis.

  • In Ketosis as indicated by blood meter (first time using meter) attaining blood ketone levels of 2.1 millimolar .

    In comparison, yesterday's ketostix measured small to moderate urine ketones.

    Attaining blood ketone levels of 0.5-3.0 millimolar is required to be considered in a state of nutritional ketosis or ketone adaptive.

    My right arm tremors are markedly stronger (more trembling) than this time last year. I will continue the diet that maintains my state of ketosis. That may not require classic keto diet. I follow the modified ketogenic diet or low carbs, (<50g / day) NO sugar. Small amounts of sugar in some food items, i.e. coconut milk 2g OK!

  • The following status of my blood work is a result of several months with a diet: low carbs, no sugar, meat protein, coconut oil.

    I take no medication.

    I do not have constipation. Well, barely.

    I eat a single small serving of meat at noon and a single small serving of meat at evening meat.

    Low carbohydrate diet and near normal diet with the exception the portion size is smaller than the typical American

    I do not consider this diet excessively or abnormally high in meat.

    No sugar.

    Yesterday, my doctor performed a physical and the blood work at the lab. I took the results and did my due diligence research which follows: ( I will let you guess if I decided to accept treatment options for high cholesterol

    as suggested by my doctor)

    cholesterol

    eatingacademy.com/nutrition...

    Peter Attia, M.D., is the co-founder and President of the Nutrition Science Initiative (NuSI), a non-profit based in San Diego, CA. He received his B.Sc. from Queen's University in Canada and his M.D. from Stanford Medical School in California. After his surgical residency in general surgery at Johns Hopkins he worked as a consultant at McKinsey & Company. He founded NuSI with scientific journalist Gary Taubes in 2012.

    Pt.4 ~ Does having normal serum triglyceride levels matter? Probably, with “normal” being defined as < 70-100 mg/dL, though it’s not entirely clear this is an independent predictor of low risk. Does having a low level of LDL-C matter? Not if LDL-P (or apoB) are high, or better said, not when the two markers are discordant.

    heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditio...

    March 18, 2014

    my

    LDL ~ 158

    HDL ~ 67

    Ketones ~ neg

    Triglycerides ~ 75

    Cholesterol ~ 240

    AHA (American Heart Assoc.) Recommendation

    We recommend using the absolute numbers for total blood cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels. They're more useful to physicians than the cholesterol ratio in determining the appropriate treatment for patients.

    Some physicians and cholesterol technicians use the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol in place of the total blood cholesterol. The ratio is obtained by dividing the HDL cholesterol level into the total cholesterol. For example, if a person has a total cholesterol of 200 mg/dL and an HDL cholesterol level of 50 mg/dL, the ratio would be 4:1. The goal is to keep the ratio below 5:1; the optimum ratio is 3.5:1.

    240/67=3.58

    LDL ~ 158

    The lower your LDL cholesterol, the lower your risk of heart attack and stroke. In fact, it's a better gauge of risk than total blood cholesterol. In general, LDL levels fall into these categories:

    Less than 100 mg/dL Optimal

    100 to 129 mg/dL Near or above optimal

    130 to 159 mg/dL Borderline high

    160 to 189 mg/dL High

    190 mg/dL and above Very high

    Your other risk factors for heart disease and stroke help determine what your LDL level should be, as well as the appropriate treatment for you. A healthy level for you may not be healthy for your friend or neighbor. Discuss your levels and your treatment options with your doctor to get the plan that works for you. The mean level of LDL cholesterol for American adults age 20 and older is 115.0 mg/dL.

    HDL ~ 67

    Less than 40 mg/dL : Low HDL cholesterol. A major risk factor for heart disease.

    (for men)

    Less than 50 mg/dL

    (for women)

    60 mg/dL and above High HDL cholesterol. An HDL of 60 mg/dL and above is considered protective against heart disease.

    With HDL (good) cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL for men, less than 50 mg/dL for women) puts you at higher risk for heart disease. In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50 mg/dL. In the average woman, they range from 50 to 60 mg/dL. An HDL cholesterol of 60 mg/dL or higher gives some protection against heart disease. The mean level of HDL cholesterol for American adults age 20 and older is 54.3 mg/dL.

    Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all result in lower HDL cholesterol. To raise your HDL level, avoid tobacco smoke, maintain a healthy weight and get at least 30-60 minutes of physical activity more days than not.

    People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol and a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. Progesterone, anabolic steroids and male sex hormones (testosterone) also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Female sex hormones raise HDL cholesterol levels.

    Ketones ~ neg

    Triglycerides ~ 75

    Less than 100 mg/dL Optimal

    Less than 150 mg/dL Normal

    150–199 mg/dL Borderline high

    200–499 mg/dL High

    500 mg/dL and above Very high

    Many people have high triglyceride levels due to being overweight/obese, physical inactivity, cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption and/or a diet very high in carbohydrates (60 percent or more of calories). High triglycerides are a lifestyle-related risk factor; however, underlying diseases or genetic disorders can be the cause. The mean level of triglycerides for American adults age 20 and older is 144.2 mg/dl. People with high triglycerides should substitute monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats —such as those found in canola oil, olive oil or liquid margarine —for saturated fats, limit added sugars, eat complex carbohydates and reduce fructose intake.

    The main therapy to reduce triglyceride levels is to change your lifestyle. This means control your weight, eat a heart-healthy diet, get regular physical activity, avoid tobacco smoke, limit alcohol to one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men and limit beverages and foods with added sugars. Visit your healthcare provider to create an action plan that will incorporate all these lifestyle changes. Sometimes, medication is needed in addition to a healthy diet and lifestyle.

    A triglyceride level of 150 mg/dL or higher is one of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk for heart disease and other disorders, including diabetes.

    Cholesterol ~ 240

    Less than 200 mg/dL Desirable level that puts you at lower risk for coronary heart disease. A cholesterol level of 200 mg/dL or higher raises your risk.

    200 to 239 mg/dL Borderline high

    240 mg/dL and above High blood cholesterol. A person with this level has more than twice the risk of coronary heart disease as someone whose cholesterol is below 200 mg/dL.

    *Your total cholesterol score is calculated by the following: HDL + LDL + 20% of your triglyceride level.

  • Nina Teicholz, author of “The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet”

    There’s a much finer understanding now of some of the biomarkers that are better predictors of risk, such as apolipoprotein, or ApoB, and non-HDL cholesterol, and they’re not worsened by saturated fat consumption. The heart disease marker field is penetrated by pharmaceutical money. The NIH and the American Heart Association are invested in certain markers and don’t want to reverse course. Nutritional recommendations have gotten mucked up over the years by numerous conflicting interests. We now know that saturated fats are the only foods known to raise HDL cholesterol, a more reliable predictor of heart attacks than LDL.

    For breakfast, instead of oatmeal or cereal, it’s better to have bacon, eggs, sausage, whole fat yogurt – not low-fat yogurt.

    For lunch, have chicken salad, egg salad, tuna salad – that’s better than a sandwich or a bean salad with kale and cranberry, for example. In terms of snacks, rather than fruit, dried fruit, crackers, chips or hummus – it’s better to have cheese, nuts, and cold cuts, such as salami, for example. For dinner, at the center of your meal should be some animal food like red meat, chicken or fish. Balance that with low-carb vegetables. Of course, if you’re diabetic or obese or have heart disease, you’ll need even fewer carbs than other people.

    These foods are delicious! They’re not going to make us sick or fat and they're not going to orphan your children. And stay away from sugar, white flour, and other refined carbohydrates: They're almost certainly the main drivers of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

    .

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