Day 9 - in freefall and could do with a hand here!

Giving up smoking has been one of the strangest experiences of my life ...I think when you start you imagine that you are going to crave cigarettes until about Day three and then the gaps between craving pangs get bigger and by Day 28, you're all fixed! Ha!

Now I'm not that naive, but I'm astonished at the ever-changing face of the demon that is called smoking; one day, you have a bit of a tough time, the next you're feeling pretty upbeat and then bang! you feel such a sense of despondency and despair!

I never expected this feeling of genuine depression, feeling so lethargic ...nothing really makes me feel any better, so much so, that at 7:00pm this evening, the best I could come up with was to go to bed and sleep for 4 hours ...only to wake up and feel not the least bit better. Now what I don't know is... is this a backdoor way of the cigarettes fighting to find a way back into my life, playing games with my subconscious?, or has giving up smoking caused me to become reflective and exposing the fact that perhaps life isn't all that good right now and smoking provided a temp. fix to problems that run deeper???? :confused:

Right now, I'd love to feel 'something' rather than this 'nothing at all' ...so help me out here guys...did giving up have such an intense impact on your mood? Grumpy would be good right now, but I just feel so incredibly flat!

So where am I ...is this normal, or nutty!:mad: Please let me know!

Cheers,

Fintan. x

9 Replies

oldestnewest
  • What you are experiencing is totally normal, so no worries! Use the search engine on the forum and put in words like 'mood', 'depression', etc..... you will find threads that describe exactly what you are feeling. Feeling flat and down is no fun but you will get through this time, your body is healing, your mind is adjusting, everything is a bit off right now.... give it time and be good to yourself okay! You'll be back to your old self soon, minus the nicotine addiction!

  • BellaBlue is correct. What you're feeling is very normal. It's not what everyone feels, nor is it always at this time in the quit for those who do, but it's quite common. It's not fun, but it will pass. Hang in there!

  • Hi Fintan.I thought like you that everything would get easier after day3.I got through to day9 too and then WALLOP! I got knocked sideways by cravings and feelings of despair and despondancy.I had stopped my Niquitin mini tabs after day3 and on the advice I got from this forum I took them again during this wobble.They helped.I think it is the Nicotine and psychological addiction twisting and turning.It changes shape.direction and intensity constantly.You have to stay strong and be vigilant.Take it one day at a time.You will have good days and bad days but it does get better and easier. Keep up your good work and well done for getting this far.All the best.Sue x

  • Hi Fintan I can identify so much with you. It's not like the adverts on telly - couple of bashes with a pillow and Nicotene is dead! I have experienced everything your going through and I can assure it passes. I'd never been depressed in my life until I stopped smoking, coupled with the lethargy I nearly went off my head. So i just went with it having confidence in what others on here said to me. It did eventually pass as do all these symptoms.

    You're doing OK honestly. If I could offer you one bit of advice it would be to psychologically trick yourself by using the terms 'I quit' or 'I stopped' rather than 'I gave up'. Otherwise it sounds like a sacrifice.

    Keep at it even when it's really tough going.

    All the best.

  • Mmm, I'm going to refer you back to my first ever post to you Fintan...

    forum.nosmokingday.org.uk/s...

    What you are going through is normal, just stay with it and it will get better.

    You have probably smoked for many years, it's not going to miraculously go away in a few weeks.

    Like I said in my linked post, everyone who starts a quit thinks that it will never get better for them, but it does - if you stick at it.

    If it didn't we wouldn't have a 1 year + section on the forum filled with posts about how people no longer think about smoking anymore.

  • A lot of people equate quitting smoking with grieving for a friend or relative. It has been such a big part of your life for so long that you have an adjustment ahead of you. It may help to take the time to mourn for the old you is passing away and in it's place will be a more energetic, healthier, happier you. Just over a week away from 2 months and I still find it hard sometimes. But it is easier than what it was at the start. You will get there my friend, and you will do it with a smile on your face.

  • Hi fintan, you probably dont want to hear this but i have been feeling the complete opposite from day 1 of this quit. Sure, there were some twitchy moments but nothing i couldnt handle.

    I have been feeling so proud and elated with what i have done that it has inadvertantly helped without me meaning it to (if that makes sense). I have said this on many threads before but ill say it again as it may help you.

    In the early days, i was so amazed at what i was doing that i was actively looking forward to getting a crave so that it would remind me how brilliant i was and how strong i could be. I honestly enjoyed the feeling of getting a crave and then making it fade away. What was weird is that they didnt come much at all. I have referred to this as the cravings realising there is no point, its futile so they dont come.

    Since then i have been so happy with myself that i can never see a time when i smoke again. Its juts not going to happen. to me, its as certain as night follows day. an absolute.

    My suggestion tyo you would be to try to view the whole thing with a different mindset. Accept quitting for what it is. Yes, it might be tricky but who cares, its not going to kill you and dont let it take control anymore, you're the boss and you decide what happens.

    enjoy every minute of it and smile to yourself and revel in every little victory.

    quitting can be fun.

  • In the early days, i was so amazed at what i was doing that i was actively looking forward to getting a crave so that it would remind me how brilliant i was and how strong i could be. I honestly enjoyed the feeling of getting a crave and then making it fade away. What was weird is that they didnt come much at all. I have referred to this as the cravings realising there is no point, its futile so they dont come.

    .

    This bit is like wen you get the hiccups and someone says, "i'll give you a tenner if you hiccup again!" and guess what - you cant.

    a bit random but it makes perfect sense to me!! hope it does to you.... :):)

  • Update from Day 9: Good news guys!

    Well, you can all look at me smugly and say 'He's only a beginner' but I want you to know that I really did have a couple of days when I felt so altered and depressed, and it's not like 'I'm all cured' and everything is going to be happy ever after from this day forward, but I'm beginning to understand.

    Today, I noticed that I was feeling pretty OK (still feel incredibly lethargic, but on the whole, almost upbeat) but most of all, I'm not really thinking about my new smoke-free status...it just feels natural and fine and I'm feeling that with week three only round the corner and this the longest (and easiest) time I've ever given up, I'm beginning to believe that 'yes, this is really happening' and I have quit (something I don't think I've ever believed before ...previously, I think I wanted to see how long I could go before the pain got to me, but this time, the pain peaked and then eased up) ...

    I know that should not run ahead and I'm still taking one day at a time, but I want you to know that I'm OK and something feels different this time ...it feels like I'm going to make it! The difference has been the support from the Forums ...I can't explain how important they have become and I see guys on here who quit 1 year+ STILL coming back to support us 'infants' because encouraging others to quit has become important for them...and I think that is really generous.

    The people here are compassionate, generous, forgiving, understanding (quite funny) and I'm still quite taken aback with the support I have received. I think out of hardship comes reward in ways I never expected.

    So all I really what to say is a humble 'thank you' to you all.

    With affection,

    Fintan. x

You may also like...