Help Needed

Hi there guys.

My quit isn't going to well. I'm on my second day, but since I cut down my 4-a-day-habit a few weeks prior, I've been getting VERY depressed. I don't know if it's an actual withdrawal symptom, or it's just my state of mind at the moment (maybe a combination of the two?)

What's interesting is that if I use my NRT, the depression lifts somewhat for some time. The more I use, the better it seems to be, but it doesn't lift completely. When I did smoke the few cigarrettes prior to my quit, it lifted even more, but still didn't go completely (I wasn't using NRT when I cut-down). I'm using oral mouth spray as my NRT, but haven't used it that much.

I can cope with the cravings, but the depression is really bad -- all I want to do is sleep, and all I can think of is bad thoughts. I've suffered from depression in the past, but no more so than the average person. It's particularly bad when I wake-up in the morning, and it's consistant throughout the whole day. I'm a bit concerned as I'm not sure if this is normal -- has anyone else experienced this? Forgive my naivity, but this is my first ever quit.

P.S. I've since read this: realcounsellingmelbourne.co...

:(

4 Replies

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  • Hey Legs,

    This is really common...you arent alone. Smoking is a high, raises dopamene (sp) makes you feel good....just like it surpresses appetite. Champix (I shoudl work for them i pump it up so much ;) ) helped with these depressed feelings to the point i didnt have them. Welbutrin is another stop smoking prescription drug (Zyban) that is actually an anti depressant. But with these come side effects that some find worse than depression.

    Believe me, even on Champix i felt tired, groggy, wondering if this was really worth it. This does pass. As with stopping any addiction, your body will have crazy reactions to what it is missing. Your heart rate will slow...which will make you feel tired, cuz when you smoke your heart races faster, trying to get that blood with less oxygen around your body. Now its working less, making you feel like you are slowing...its really awesome when you think of it that way?!

    That was my long winded way to say...Yes, I went through it too, and there are about 25+ more that I know on here who went through the same thing....some are going through it at the 4 month stage.

    Stay with it, it is WAY worth it...

    Steve

  • Hi there,

    First of all, my heart goes out to you. I've suffered from recurring depression for a long time, and that low feeling is just so awful.

    Not everyone will agree with me on this, but my advice would be to increase your use of NRT for a while - maybe try some low dose patches. Get yourself a doctor's appointment as soon as possible and explain how you've been feeling. They may prescribe you with mild antidepressants, and/or exercise/CBT (varies on the doctor, but I think most prescribe the medication as it's easier and probably cheaper).

    The reason I say to 'up' the NRT is because any form of treatment you have will take a few weeks to start to work. Once it does, you can then gradually cut back down.

    In the meantime, look after youself, try and get a little exercise if you can (just a walk to the shops is fine) and try and eat well. There are lots of excellent resources online on how to manage depression.

    Take care

    *hugs*

    Jen

  • You're Certainly Not Alone

    Nicotine has been our mother, father, brother, sister, best friend & lover. It didn't judge us, never questioned us. When we need it, it was... there.

    And now. we've shown it the door. There's an empty spot in our lives far larger than the physical space taken up by a packet of smokes!

    I don't know about anyone else but the only activity I couldn't manage to do while smoking was sleep. You've got to love Stop Smoking Clinic therapists who've never smoked. "Just do activities you don't associate with smoking", they'll blithely tell you. Great... EVERYTHING I did I associated with smoking.

    So right now, there's a HUGE hole in my life. Husband can't fill it. Kids don't, nor do pets. I am literally going through a grieving process & that includes depression. I'm too new in my quit to not feel terribly awkward without cigarettes on me. I panic when I pat my pocket & they're not there. And then I remember I've quit. I can't go into the few places I frequent that allow smoking - I don't want to but I'm not yet 'comfortable' in non-smoking zones.

    I no longer smoke but I don't yet see myself as a non-smoker. I don't know how to... BE without cigarettes. I'm having to learn one small step at a time & depression goes hand in hand with that. I feel flat, especially on dull days. Music can bring tears to my eyes. I have low energy in spite of a good diet, extra vitamins & exercise. I catch myself wondering if life is always going to seem so desperately dull & as dramatic as it sounds... pointless.

    Thankfully, there's enough logic left in me to realize that's part of the addiction. I put down the cigarettes. I've walked away from cigarettes I've found. I've said "No thank you" when offered. So the addiction monster is simply trying another approach. I know I just have to ride it out. It doesn't help that we're into the shortest days of the year either. Soon though, we'll be past the mad rush that's the holiday season, we'll notice days are starting to get a wee bit longer & every day we don't smoke brings us closer to the day when life is good again. And then... it will be better still.

    It's just geeting to that stage that seems like such a burden right now!

  • Nicotine has been our mother, father, brother, sister, best friend & lover. It didn't judge us, never questioned us. When we need it, it was... there.

    And now. we've shown it the door. There's an empty spot in our lives far larger than the physical space taken up by a packet of smokes!

    I don't know about anyone else but the only activity I couldn't manage to do while smoking was sleep. You've got to love Stop Smoking Clinic therapists who've never smoked. "Just do activities you don't associate with smoking", they'll blithely tell you. Great... EVERYTHING I did I associated with smoking.

    So right now, there's a HUGE hole in my life. Husband can't fill it. Kids don't, nor do pets. I am literally going through a grieving process & that includes depression. I'm too new in my quit to not feel terribly awkward without cigarettes on me. I panic when I pat my pocket & they're not there. And then I remember I've quit. I can't go into the few places I frequent that allow smoking - I don't want to but I'm not yet 'comfortable' in non-smoking zones.

    I no longer smoke but I don't yet see myself as a non-smoker. I don't know how to... BE without cigarettes. I'm having to learn one small step at a time & depression goes hand in hand with that. I feel flat, especially on dull days. Music can bring tears to my eyes. I have low energy in spite of a good diet, extra vitamins & exercise. I catch myself wondering if life is always going to seem so desperately dull & as dramatic as it sounds... pointless.

    Thankfully, there's enough logic left in me to realize that's part of the addiction. I put down the cigarettes. I've walked away from cigarettes I've found. I've said "No thank you" when offered. So the addiction monster is simply trying another approach. I know I just have to ride it out. It doesn't help that we're into the shortest days of the year either. Soon though, we'll be past the mad rush that's the holiday season, we'll notice days are starting to get a wee bit longer & every day we don't smoke brings us closer to the day when life is good again. And then... it will be better still.

    It's just geeting to that stage that seems like such a burden right now!

    I could have written that myself it is so very very true.......but the pain does ease......the fight against it is tiring but the rewards speak for themselves....

    one day at a time because you only have to read posts from those further down the line to know it's worth it

    :)

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