Kidney transplant evaluation but I’m 66 ... - Kidney Transplant

Kidney Transplant
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Kidney transplant evaluation but I’m 66 years old

I see that there are MANY fewer kidney transplants performed with persons 65 years of age and older. How hard is it to qualify for a transplant when you are 65 years of age or older?

Thank you,

Jayhawker

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The transplant evaluation is to assure you are healthy enough for a transplant, and will check you have no other major health issues, e.g., cancer, heart disease. The evaluation will also assess that you have a healthy lifestyle and that you will adhere to the many post-transplant requirements. I was evaluated and approved when I was 65 and received my transplant when I was 66 and my age was never an issue.

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I had my kidney transplant last year and I am 65 and doing great!

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I am 68 and had my transplant 4 months ago

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Thank you each for sharing your experiences. I certainly know it would be an incredible blessing if I do qualify for a transplant. So I’ll remain optimistic while preparing for any inevitability🐶

Jayhawker

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I’m 65 now had my transplant on March 9, 2018 at 64 years old. Like one of the other post they only do the evaluation to make sure you are fit enough for the transplant. The process of the surgery is pretty tense. I still am dealing with pain in my right thigh. Not as bad as it was but it’s still there. Now I am dealing with a BK virus so who knows what’s next.

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The new organ allocation will give a kidney from a young deceased donor to a young person waiting even if the older person has more time. Not saying you won’t get a kidney but your wait time may be longer. You also have to be healthy enough to be approved. Best bet is to find a living donor.

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I knew the deceased donor system had changed to essentially match available kidneys to recipients by age, ie, only deceased donor kidneys from older donors will go to older recipients but wasn’t sure exactly how that works. For instance, as a 66 year old person, does the deceased donor kidney need to come from a person 60 years of age or older?? I was hoping it might include kidneys from donors 50 years of age or older for a 66 year old recipient... But this is all new to me. I had just assumed that I’d be too old for a transplant as I reached renal failure.

I’m glad to hear my age won’t disqualify me. The eligibility testing will verify whether I’m healthy enough overall. I do live a healthy lifestyle regardless of whether I qualify for a transplant or not actually.

As I said in an earlier post; it would be incredible if I find I qualify. But that is certainly no guarantee that a deceased donor kidney will arrive. This is definitely in God’s hands.

Jayhawker

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My deceased donor was from a 20 year old!

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For example if you are 66 and at the top of the list and another person on the list is 21. A deceased donor matches you both but is young, it will go to the younger person. No it doesnt mean you have to get a kidney from an older deceased donor but you could get bumped. There might not be a young person matching in which case you would get it. Best to find a living donor. I am a RN and living donor. Would do it again if I could grow another.

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Thanks, that makes more sense.

Jayhawker

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I have several people I am in touch with, that are 68 and have successfully been put on the kidney transplant list. As long as the transplant center deems you healthy enough to have a transplant and everything that entails - immunosuppressant drugs after and for the rest of your life. They want to make sure you don't have any major health issues that would jeopardize your transplant. When I had my transplant in 1999, there was a lady I met that just had her transplant the day after mine and was 72.

Best of luck. GO FOR IT! You will never be sorry having a transplant.

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I’m scheduled to begin eligibility testing on July 31st. I’m certainly hoping for good news on that front but realize if I don’t qualify I haven’t actually lost anything—I’m headed for dialysis without the transplant and so would still be eligible for PD dialysis.

I’m not yet on dialysis but am really expecting I will be within the year. My kidneys have improved some over the last several months. They are now stable with creatinine of 3.1 and eGFR of 15. I’m actually feeling fairly well and am functioning much better than when my eGFR was 8. I’m also not yet experiencing fluid retention.

I live in the central part of the United States. The transplant center I’ll be working with should I qualify has some of the shortest wait times for transplants in the nation along with some of the highest one year survival rates. Frankly, I feel very fortunate to be located in the same community with this transplant center. It’s the center that will complete the eligibility testing for me.

So, I’m hoping for the best. I’m definitely going to try for a transplant. I want to pursue all treatment options starting with that which is considered the best option. However, I am at peace regarding this situation. God has got this ✝️

I’ll just need to do my best to take care of myself, work with my medical team, then wait to see what God intends.

Jayhawker

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God definitely blessed me with my transplant. I got mine at U of WI and only waited 14 months. Of course that was 1999! My deceased donor was only 16 and his kidney wound up being a 4/6 match. I have never had a rejection episode and doctors were able to reduce the amount of transplant meds I take.

I wish you only the very best. Expect to be at the transplant center most of the day. Because of the number of tests they will do, you might not find out the results that day, but should in a week or so. Please let me know how it all goes. Where is your transplant center?

Take care!

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