GFR: Hi, I'm trying to get to the bottom of... - Kidney Disease

Kidney Disease

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GFR

Lisell profile image

Hi, I'm trying to get to the bottom of tachycardia besides the lame excuses of stress and anxiety. I've been going back over my GFR results and in 2016 it was 60, 2017 60, 2019 56 and 2020 66. With these types of results should I have had further investigations done. I have never been offered anything not even a urine test. As I say just doing some investigating. Thanks in advance

10 Replies

Lame excuses or not, stress and anxiety are serious issues that can cause major heart issues for anyone with a chronic health issue, like CKD. Stress is usually thought of as negative impacts on one's health. Positive things can also impact our stress level and cause similar problems.I've included a link to an article that will explain the Stages of CKD. With the exception of your GFR of 56 in 2019, you appear to be in Stage 2.

kidneyfund.org/kidney-disea...

Believe it or not, that is actually a good thing. I can't speak to your situation in the UK, but here in the USA, most folks don't get informed about CKD until their GFR falls well into Stage 3 or even Stage 4.

While there is no cure for CKD the sooner a person finds out about having this chronic illness, the more time you have to slow the progression. Working with a Renal Dietitian, and reviewing your previous labs for protein, phosphorus, potassium,

sodium, and calcium you'll be able to develop a kidney-friendly meal plan to meet your specific wants and needs. Working with your doctors, especially a cardiologist if that's possible, and developing a safe and effective exercise regimen that can be done year-round in all types of weather is another major step in dealing with CKD. I do have some minor heart issues and I do a lot of walking and when I can, I ride my bike.

If you'd like to learn more about CKD, please use kidneyschool.org and view the learning modules. Take notes as you watch them and prepare a list of questions for your doctor(s).

In reading your post this next part may just be a difference in our common language. You said, "I have never been offered anything not even a urine test." Why wait to have something offered? Become proactive. It's your life and your health. Ask them to do the tests you want to be done. If this is a problem with your NHS, then you may wish to consider going private. I understand that will cost money, but in the end, you'll be able to have so much more time to control the CKD and that will put less stress and strain on your heart.

One final thing, on a positive note. You've done a great job of tracking your GFR over the last few years. I use a spreadsheet to track important numbers like GFR, serum creatinine, ACR (albumin-creatinine ratio), BUN (blood urea nitrogen). Along with your protein, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and calcium tracking can let you know when you are either too low or too high within the reference range and allow you the opportunity to develop questions to ask your doctors before it gets too serious.

Best of luck.

Lisell profile image
Lisell in reply to Mr_Kidney

Thanks you for your very informative response. I did not mean to down play stress and anxiety but I do think sometimes these are used when the problem is not staring doctors in the face.

I am the type of person who does not like to be a nuisance (but that is changing) and if the doctors haven't been in touch then they are not worried. The reason for the investigating is because I have seen a couple of cardiologists and one said after a few holter monitor readings it was just sinus tachycardia....go away. The latest one has put it down to stress and anxiety after a 3 day holter reading. If they had bothered to talk to me about my life they would find I am not stressed. My heart rate increases on the slightest exertion and this includes household chores, bathing and walking (ranges from 110 to 170bpm).

I will do like you say and make a spread sheet with the components you mentioned and I will learn to be a even bigger pain in the neck.

😀

Mr_Kidney profile image
Mr_Kidney in reply to Lisell

The way you describe yourself is pretty close to how I described myself prior to finding out I had CKD in June of 2017. That changed when after that diagnosis was finally made and I went back and checked previous labs and discovered that I had CKD for over a year before I was informed. I never paid much attention to hard copies as I thought the doctors would be open and honest with me. Never Again! I've fired more doctors since then because they wouldn't be open and honest with me regarding my own health. I get to be the one to make the final decision after I get their best medical advice. If I find out they aren't being open and honest, I fire them and obtain the services of a more willing doctor. In the previous three and a half years I've gone through 6 PCPs, 2 cardiologists, 2 urologists, and three nephrologists (actually only fired one, as the 2nd retired to teaching and the third is my current one).

I enjoy my life and the things I get to do and putting up with an ill-informed and/or unwilling physician who won't tell me what's wrong for his/her reasons is not doing the job s/he was hired to do.

Keep on top of your health situation and never stop asking questions.

bubbles53 profile image
bubbles53 in reply to Mr_Kidney

YOU MUST HAVE AN EXCELLENT HEALTH PLAN IN ORDER TO EVEN HAVE ACCESS TO THAT MANY HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS . I AM 67 YEARS OLD AND ON MEDICARE AND ALSO HAVE A VERY GOOD MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLAN ALSO LIVE IN BOSTON, MA.( A MAJOR MEDICAL CAPITAL IN THE US ). I STILL HAVE TO CHOOSE PROVIDERS FROM WITHIN A NETWORK.

I MUST GIVE YOU CREDIT FEELING COMFORTABLE ENOUGH TO GO THROUGH THAT MANY PROVIDERS. I KNOW THEY SHARE INFORMATION AMONG THEMSELVES. I WOULD HAVE SOME TREPIDATION ABOUT BEING LABELED . THATS JUST ME.

Mr_Kidney profile image
Mr_Kidney in reply to bubbles53

I'm also on Medicare. Original Medicare and I'm not tied to a network and don't require a referral for most things. Also, as a retired special ed teacher I have an excellent supplement program. What good would it do me or anyone for that matter being tied to a plan with doctors who don't serve the best needs of the patient? If you live in a big city with many doctors you may have a large network to choose from. I live in a small town and drive about 30 miles to my doctors and two hours to a couple of others. When it's safe again to travel, I'll pack up my RV and see more of this country. Should any medical need emerge my plan goes with me and I never have to worry about being out of network.

I hope that satisfies your curiosity.

bubbles53 profile image
bubbles53 in reply to Mr_Kidney

IF YOUR WILLING TO TRAVEL THAT MUCH I SEE WHERE MY CONCERNS WOULD NOT EVEN BE SOMETHING THAT YOU WOULD HAVE TO CONSIDER.I DO REQUIRE A REFERRAL FOR MOST SPECIALISTS. I LIVE IN THE CITY AND DO NOT DRIVE. I SEE THAT OUR SITUATIONS ARE VERY DIFFERENT.

Mr_Kidney profile image
Mr_Kidney in reply to bubbles53

Most folks, you'll find, have different situations as we are a nation of individuals.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS.

Patient001 profile image
Patient001 in reply to Lisell

I have found that malnutrition can contribute. Do you thing you might have a vitamin/mineral deficiency? This will show up in your tongue as patches, or geographic tongue. If so, you should consider a very small dose of vitamin/mineral supplements every now and them, or just eat plenty of fruits to nourish yourself.

You could be hyperthyroid. Ever had a thyroid panel done? Ask your pcp if that would be appropriate for your symptoms.

Lisell profile image
Lisell in reply to Ladyboomer

I have had my thyroid tested many times and it is always normal. Been to Hosp again today and got yet another holter monitor but at least this time they are investigating Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia after one hospital ruled it out because average heart rate was not over hundred despite me saying it wouldn't be because my heart rate can go as low as 32 bpm. Fingers crossed this time.

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