Central obesity : Hi any ideas on how to... - Weight Loss NHS

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Central obesity

Hi any ideas on how to tackle central obesity

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I have just read a very good article about it on Wikipedia and it suggests that while diet is important it has little long term effect on this problem; the key being aerobic exercise with resistance. So for example walking up a hill is better than on the flat.

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Good morning, ElizabethSaturday, and welcome back :)

I see you were here some time ago. This Welcome post will help you find your way around healthunlocked.com/nhsweigh... I recommend joining a weekly weigh in on the day of your choice, and using the Daily Diary for meal planning.

Active participation really does pay off so I hope we'll see you around :)

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Thank you, I am about to restart health and fitness after being ill for a while, so I thought i’d better come back... I will weigh myself tomorrow though I am more interested in shape and fitness than weight really.

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Then don't focus on weight. Maybe take some measurements and/or check out which clothes are tight at present, and use those to measure your progress.

The weigh-in may not be for you but there is plenty for you to get involved in. All the forum activities are listed on our chat thread, here healthunlocked.com/nhsweigh...

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What’s central obesity ? 🤨

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Fat deposited around and within your abdomen is a typical outcome of a very-high-carbohydrate diet (otherwise known as SAD - Standard American Diet). It's sometimes called a "rice belly" or "wheat belly" for that reason.

If you can drop processed starches and sugar from your diet, it will shrink. Get rid of things like breakfast cereals, sweets, cookies, cakes, crisps, added sugar, flour-based products (especially white bread), tinned sauces/soups/baked beans, ready meals ... it's quite a long list, now I come to think of it! Perhaps a simpler suggestion is this: base your meals around fresh ingredients - vegetables, meat, eggs, and dairy - and avoid stuff that comes packaged in plastic or cardboard.

There's no miracle cure for this sort of thing, but if you start eating proper food again, it'll slowly but surely disappear.

As mentioned by others, a good exercise programme will help too. Focus on "core" exercises, which strengthen those muscles that aren't very visible, but are important for maintaining your body shape and posture.

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Hi thank you for your reply.

I have read contrasting reports about the type of exercise and how much to do. I do quite a lot of cardio but try to fit in resistance training 3 times a week. Along with walking and swimming.

I am trying to follow a low carb diet whilst upping my protein intake. It isn't easy though.

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Are you counting carbs? What range are you aiming for? Not that counting is essential but I see you're counting calories, so it may be helpful for you to put the emphasis on carbs rather than calories, if that's the way you want to go

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Hi I am trying to stay close to 100g of carbs as possible. I have an appointment I track my food on and try to stay within my limits

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I'd say you're doing all the right things. Realistically, any exercise is good exercise!

How long have you been doing low-carb? What do you find "not easy" specifically?

Bear in mind that on a low-carb diet the main replacement for energy calories should be fat, not protein. Humans are not good at all at burning protein for energy. Of course you still need your protein for muscle repair, but there's no need to go overboard. If you're eating inadequate fat you will probably struggle.

Give it some time. The belly will go, but it's not going to disappear overnight. 12-18 months is realistic to achieve an actual flat stomach.

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I have been watching calories for a while but have only been more specifically cutting my carbs for a couple of weeks

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Ok, it will take time to kick in. LCHF works, but there's no such thing as miracles :)

As BridgeGirl said, if you're going to do low carb then you need to focus on carbs. Restricting calories on LCHF can actually mess things up completely - it's crucially important to eat until you're full and allow your body to make its own decisions about calories. 100g is relatively high and you may find you have to do a proper "induction" to kill the carb cravings (that is, <25g for two weeks).

If you'd like to join the LCHF group, there are plenty of people there who will cheer you along and give you some tips from experience:

healthunlocked.com/lchf-diet

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Low carb is considered to be between 100 to 150 g if carbs. Ketosis is a very low carb diet with only 50g of carbs. I am not aiming for this. 100g target is my aim

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British Heart Foundation give good information on which fats to choose in your diet, how excess fats from consuming too many carbs fats and sugars are stored, and which foods to choose in which amounts to reduce internal fat around organs and also shrink fat cells in the skin. Worth a look. Knowledge is power!

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Thank you I will take a look

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