Weight Loss NHS
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BMI

According to the BMI i need to lose another 3st after already losing 6st .... that seams a tad unrealistic to me give my journey so far although to be politically correct and access NHS services I will endeavour to be within my BMI range......how close are people here to the BMI weights ?

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The BMI calculator is a guide only, particularly as we age. I have no idea how old you are, but studies have shown that over 65's live longer with a BMI between 23 and 33, with 27.5 being the optimum number.

I'd go for health and well-being, before political correctness any day :)

As you appear to be staying with us and to make navigating the forum easier, we've put all the information you'll need in a newbie pack and here's the link

healthunlocked.com/nhsweigh...

Please take the time to read it carefully, so that you're able to enjoy everything that we have on offer.

Wishing you all the best :)

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Thank you

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That’s interesting maybe they could ammend there info on the NHS BMI calculater as it is telling me I need a BMI of 25 to be in range

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Maybe you could direct that question to the NHS? I'm sure we'd all be interested to hear the reply.

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I was raising the point to see if anyone else felt disappointed in there progress when following BMI guidance.... but like labelling it’s only a guide just because it says healthy low fat doesn’t mean it’s true ..... I have learned that as well.....so it’s a very focused journey at every level I am finding.

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I think it's very important for all of us to do our own research and then we can make more informed decisions.

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Agreed but only if your capable many deaf people don’t get the education either as that also lacks access so by definition they cannot do research..... I obviously can manage after a fashion.

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All of my research was done online, which made it visual and equally accessible to the deaf, I would have thought.

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Agreed unfortunately I know older deaf people who’s literacy is limited so need support

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Also I thought I was making informed decisions before but I was making the wrong ones a salad sandwich on Wholemeal bread with baked crisps must be ok ...how I was so wrong

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I was the same, eating a low fat, high carb diet, as advised by all the medical professionals, only to discover that diet is the very one that leads to obesity, Type 2 diabetes, fatty liver and other metabolic diseases.

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Exactly do confusing with different information...... I also paid for expensive gym and done it full on but with little effect ...when I changed eating habits and little varied excercise it all worked for me

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Me too! It took me over 40 years to find the right way though!

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Never give up .... that’s another lesson we learned.

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That's true! :D

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Hi there Was-me, and others interested! I'm fairly sure the NHS BMI calculator DOES take into account age, as I had to type in mine (73) before it would continue! I've lost one stone on the NHS 12 week programme, utilising the scientific facts on "The Truth About Carbs" with Dr Alex Van Tullekin, on BBC, a while back. (I don't think it's still available on iPlayer, sadly), and slicing & freezing the healthier breads that I love, and then toasting from FROZEN. It works brilliantly as I'm a bread addict (just stick to toast now - sourdough, rye, wholemeal, etc). MY BMI has come down from the midrange of 27, to 24 and I'm very happy!!! `;0

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Wow thank you for the bread tip I actually cut it out all together crisp bread now only

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Yes, I used to cut it out & only have Ryvita type crispbreads but freezing bread & toasting it from frozen has made a HUGE difference to my life - I no longer feel deprived! ;)

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I think that the NHS system only takes age into account when calculating recommended calorie intake, and tries to insist that everybody gets down to BMI 25.

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You could be right, there! ;)

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I'm pretty close to the NHS healthy range but my thinking has shifted. I'm now more interested in maintaining a healthy eating plan that I enjoy, and I'll let the weight find its own level

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Beginning to think the same

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Six stone is a brilliant loss!

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Thank you ..... but never enough....lol ... and expensive in clothes....but of course very happy with the changes

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I am 64 and my BMI is 23.5.

Luckily I realized I needed to watch out when I weighed 163 now I am 152 pounds. I’m amazed at how much weight you have lost! That is quite a huge achievement.

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Congratulations, G1nny!!!! Well done you!!! You rock!!! :)

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Thanks

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Thank you but my BMI is still over 28 so still a bit to go but I’m over the brow of the hill now and on the home run

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If you are "old", BMI 28 is ideal.

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Ok 57 it that Old ....😁

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Hi, Was-me,

As moreless says, the ideal BMI for "normal" old people is 27.5, but, if you have a high lean mass, it is still not very relevant.

When I was fit, I knew that the NHS BMI 25 “top of the ideal weight range” was totally irrelevant for “Athletes like me”... but, since then I have lost approximately 10kg of muscle and put on 20kg (three stone) of fat!

The SBMI system takes age into consideration in calculating the "top of the ideal weight range" (search SBMI or Smart BMI).

What matters is body-fat percentage, and there are more accurate systems for estimating fat, see "Thoughts on reducing fat":

healthunlocked.com/nhsweigh...

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Thanks for the smart BMI calculator. I’ve read a lot now,

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See "History of BMI":

physicalculturestudy.com/20...

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Thank you that makes more sense as I’m 5’10”. And broad shoulders but I can pinch more than an inch still ...... more down to toning now I would hope

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