What is "suitable replacement work" when pregnant? - NCT

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What is "suitable replacement work" when pregnant?

Micaelap
Micaelap

Hi,

I'm 24+5 weeks pregnant and the last month I've had massive problems with pelvic girdle pain. I've had to take a week off work, and only returned for four days before I had to be driven home from work in pain, shaking and dizzy. I phoned Maternity Triage who said it sounded like like my body was telling me to slow down. Seeing my midwife on Thursday morning for my 25 week appointment.

I work with staff training in a big company with more than 20 different locations all over Manchester. Everyday at work involves standing and sitting for longer periods, as well as lots of driving (the woman at Maternity Triage said that this have helped aggrevate the pain). My question is: what would constitute as a suitable replacement job? There is really only two options: Working with the staff in the shops won't work (too much standing and lifting), working in the office would also be hard (sitting down for long periods).

Does a pregnancy-related problem such as pgp count as a risk in the risk assessment? Or is my only options to reduce my hours heavily or go on sick pay instead of being suspended with full pay?

Thank you!

12 Replies

You would need to speak to your manager but I would think that office based with reasonable adjustments should be workable? Your employers should be able to set up your workspace appropriately and offer you extra breaks to get up and stretch or do whatever helps you feel comfortable! You’d be surprised what they can offer if you ask

Speak to your manager and have a look at your policy. I know that if you take more than a certain about of sick leave in the last trimester in my job you will automatically be put on mat. Leave.

Have you tried things like a belt, or physio?

Micaelap
Micaelap in reply to roxannacar

I'm wearing a support belt and waiting for physio but apparently it can take weeks to get an appointment. The only reason I'm asking about the "suitable alternative work" is because I can't afford to be home on sick pay, but I obviously can't work full time at the moment either. I suppose there is no such thing as being sick 50% and work 50%? At the moment I can sit down for more than 15 minutes before I have to lie down because of the pressure in my pelvis..

roxannacar
roxannacar in reply to Micaelap

I'm not sure lying down at work every 15 mins is something that can be accommodated tbh.

Have a word with citizens advice bureau about your rights, and have a read of your pregnancy/family policy.

Also is it worth/possible to pay private physio as a one odd appointment to get see and given some exercises? If 15 mins is as much as you can stand/sit for now I think it's worth it.

Micaelap
Micaelap in reply to roxannacar

Private physio seems to be the only option at the moment, just got a call from the nhs one that said she could sort an appointment beginning of October.

Kate91
Kate91 in reply to Micaelap

I would recommend a chiropractor rather than physio, if going private as chiropractors specialise in skeletal issues and realignment, i havent had it myself but seen plenty of people say that it helps with Pelvic pain in pregnancy i would go but cant afford to

Winnie258
Winnie258 in reply to Micaelap

My friend saw an osteopath for pelvic pain, it really helped her.

Have you already had a risk assessment? I had to adjust my work level due to attending construction sites as part of my daily role. My HR and H&S departments worked on support me by making my role more office based. I would suggest scheduling a meeting with all departments to discuss plans going forward, hopefully your company will support you!

Micaelap
Micaelap in reply to Chrissie81

I've had my risk assessment, and according to my manager my job has nothing risky about it. When I tried to say that I was worried that my pelvic pain would get worse going back to work after my seven day absence she said that I had to manage myself.

Chrissie81
Chrissie81 in reply to Micaelap

Sounds like your manager does not know how a risk assessment works. It is your company’s job to protect you and themselves in the workplace. Can you contact your HR department to discuss? Or failing that seek outside advice. I would try to push as much as you can, being pregnant protects you, if you are feeling discriminated against or unsupported then use those words. Good luck! Have a look on the HSE website for risk assessment advice ;)

Micaelap
Micaelap in reply to Chrissie81

Unfortunately my manager is the hr person. She says that pelvic pain does not go under the risk assessment, just the actual pregnancy without complications. Scared I'm going to have to go on maternity leave early to get any money to survive.

Chrissie81
Chrissie81 in reply to Micaelap

Try giving the CAB a call for advice! It’s the worst when the manager is also HR?! I was very lucky with my company adjusting my role so did not have to go down this path. However if I had needed to I would have, it is only for 15 weeks!? I am sure they could work something out for you.

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