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Has anyone experienced anaesthetising drops not having any effect during Eylea injection?

I had my sixth Eylea injection (for Wet AMD) two weeks ago. I have never felt anything before with previous injections except for a tiny sharp prick-like sensation a couple of injections ago which lasted about a nano second. The last time though, I had several anaesthetising drops put into my eye over a few minutes and when it came to the injection, I felt everything from start to finish which was extremely unpleasant. I was then told that there was a blood spot the top of my eye in the corner and the person who administered the injection started dabbing it with cotton buds. She then told me that I would experience redness across the top of my eye over the next few days and that it would spread over my eye. Not to worry unless it became very painful. She told me to check it in a mirror before I left the hospital so that I could see how big it was now and keep my eye on it to see if it became any bigger. What I saw in the following days was a small tube like swelling on the eye all across under the top eyelid and patches of bloodshot around the eye with a tube like swollen vessel down under the top of the skin on the left of the eye. I was told that it would take about a week to clear - it was almost two weeks. Has anyone experienced anything like this? I am now terrified of having my next injection. This was a different person to give me the injection. I had usually had the same doctor for the previous five injections. I will be informing the Opthamologist of this prior to my next one in February. Sorry for the length of post.

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That sounds really scary. I have had a bloodshot eye after injection in the past but nothing like you describe. Did they give you anything to soothe the discomfort? Perhaps they scratched your eye with the clamp? What always worries me is when they cut a slit in the piece of gauze over my face and just feel where my eye is. Could they have cut your eyeball in that way? To me, such procedure seems quite primitive. Hope your next injection is alright. And yes, you must report the issue, not just to the doctor who gives the treatment.

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The nurses who now give me my injections have to use the facial cover you describe, it is unbelievabley clumsy, no fault of theirs, the doctors don’t bother with it. I think it is a hazard rather than a help.

I too have had a blood vessel hit just twice in 80 injections but they have never been as extensive as described by springcross. Normally, the blood should clear within acweek.

I would contact the clinic for advice also, I would ask that the next injection be in a different quadrant of the eye avoiding the area which has bled.

The problem with the anaesthetic failing to work is not uncommon, you could also ask if they can use a different one, most clinics have at least two available.

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Hi Rennatk. Thanks for your reply. I have not had a facial cover since my second injection but that doesn't bother me. I agree with you that it is probably more of a hazard than a help. I will be asking the Opthamologist that I see prior to the injection if it can be administered in a different place. I may also ask him if I can go back on my previous day which was a Thursday instead of a Friday which seems to be me new day

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Hi Rennatk. Had to finish my previous reply early as something strange started to happen - a voice started reading out everything I had typed???? Most peculiar. Anyway, I was going to finish off saying that if I could go back to my previous day which was a Thursday, I would probably get the other doctor back who has done all my other injections.

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Good idea, good practice seems to vary from one individual to another.

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Hi Rennatk. Had to finish my previous reply early as something strange started to happen - a voice started reading out everything I had typed???? Most peculiar. Anyway, I was going to finish off saying that if I could go back to my previous day which was a Thursday, I would probably get the other doctor back who has done all my other injections. (Had to copy and paste this because I put this reply in a reply to myself!!! - not used to posting here, sorry).

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Most drapes are pre cut so no scissors near your eye! Haven't used those you describe for 4 years.

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Sorry to say, wheeyl, that our clinic "always" use the uncut drapes and scissors. And it scares me.

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The nurses who do mine are very careful and tear the drape rather than use scissors. But, it all seems so unnecessary.

I was told that on one occasion a drop of Betadine splashed into a patients other eye and so it became standard practice to put anaesthetic into both eyes as a precaution, far more sensible and I imagine cost effective thsn the drapes unless of course, you are one of the unfortunates allergic to the anaesthetic!

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Hi ayayay. Many thanks for your reply. I only had the facial cover used for the first two injections - it has not been used since, not that it matters to me - it was pre-cut anyway (or I assume it was as all that the doctor did was push through the cover, there was no cutting involved). She did say to me that there are many small blood vessels in the eye and it was difficult to avoid them some of the time which is fair enough but it was a nasty shock. Also, before she injected my eye, she said "sharp scratch" and I remember thinking that it was a strange thing to say as the person who gave me my first five injections never ever said that and I had no problems with him.

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Hi ayayay. I wasn't offered anything for the discomfort but maybe that was because she didn't know how it was going to affect me. Initially, my eye felt very stiff and I felt that each time I tried to look to the side it felt very bruised. I just left it to see how it would pan out over the following few days but I didn't think it was uncomfortable enough afterwards to contact the Eye Hospital about it but would have done so if it had been. I was worried about the tube-like swelling though and if she hadn't told me that my eye would look worse over the next few days to a week, I would definitely have at least rang the eye hospital.

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Hi ayayay. I understand how scary that must feel. Can you not ask them not to bother to use the gauze as it makes you very worried?

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Thanks springcross

It is not really a big issue; the scissors just make me nervous, but I keep my eyes closed during that procedure so that my eyeball is protected.

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Sorry you had a bad experience. The drape is not mandatory now from the new Royal College of Ophthalmologists guidance and it can be more of a hiderance than help. Injecting into the bottom of the eye is generally more comfortable than at the top according to research. The pain may have in part been due to coming in contact with a Scleral nerve which is generally unavoidable, as the injector can't see them. The redness you had, although alarming is a collection of blood between the white of the eye and the clear covering (conjunctiva) or in other words a bruise and will vary from a tiny spot to most of the white being covered. This is caused simply by going through your tissues, like pricking a finger which will bleed.

Tell them about the pain and they can change things.

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HI wheezyl. Thanks for your reply. I haven't had a drape since the second injection but it doesn't bother me. The first two I had must have been pre-cut as I don't remember anyone cutting anything only pushing through the drape to open it up. I think you are right about injecting into the bottom of the eye as when I mentioned in my first post that the most I had ever experienced before was a nano second sharp prick, that was when I had an injection into the upper part of the eye. As I said, it was only a nano second but enough to make me jump which could have had a nasty consequence. That particular doctor didn't inject into the top part again.

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You say: "This was a different person to give me the injection. I had usually had the same doctor for the previous five injections."

DO NOT ALLOW THIS INJECTOR TO TREAT YOU AGAIN ! DID YOU GET HER NAME ?

When you arrive for your next appointment, ask who is giving the injections. If it is her, just say that you'd rather have someone else even if you have to come another day.

THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR THE BAD EXPERIENCE THAT YOU HAD !

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Hi kevinaki. Thanks for your reply. Yes, for the first five injections I used to go on a Thursday and had the same person injecting me each time. The last time, my appointment was for a Friday and the Opthamologist was different and so was the person giving the injections. I imagine different crews for different days. Unfortunately, my next appointment in February will be on a Friday too but I will be making enquiries then to ask if I can change my days back to a Thursday in the hope that I can see the person who gave me my first five injections.

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Off to have a good look in the mirror .. Last injection on 31st left me with blood shot bit which has not entirely disappeared. I have another injection due on Wednesday so will be asking what's going on if not gone!

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Hi yes I've had quite a few " bleeders". Some of them take ages to clear and can make eye very uncomfortable. Check out one of my old posts if you want a scary pic lol.

I too find inj in upper part of eye more painful during and after than those lower ( I wonder if lower gets more anaesthetic as it runs down from top of eye and pools there?).

As wheezyl says, it's a lottery whether they hit things they can't see.

My advice is use lots of sterile soothing drops. Hylotear is good and in UK you can get it (& others) on prescription.

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Hi eyesright. Thanks for the reply. I have checked out that scary pic - oh my goodness! I'm glad it turned out to be nowhere near as bad - pain wise - as it looks. Many thanks for the advice re the sterile drops, I will keep that in mind. All the best to you.

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Sorry you had such a scary experience, springcross! Here in the US, I am currently receiving Eylea injections, every 8 weeks, and before that I was receiving Avastin injections at shorter intervals. The injections have always been given to me by the same doctor. He is very efficient, but rather impersonal. The worst I have experienced afterwards, beside the silicon lubricant blob that was with me for months until it floated up out of my field of vision, has been the occasional somewhat bloodshot eye - lasting anywhere from a few days to, in the extreme case, two weeks. I don't know what anesthetic they

use on my eye, but it works well. I have never heard of the "drape", or "facial cover"

mentioned by posters in this thread. I do not understand its purpose. Maybe it is not in use in the US. I am lucky to have a very skillful doctor administer the shots to me. I appreciate that much more after reading about some of the experiences others have had.

I think the skill and experience of the person giving the injections is the key factor, and that

it is wise to do whatever is necessary to make sure you are receiving the injections from the best person available in the medical facility where you are being treated. I might also suggest taking some medication to help you relax before each injection, if possible. Best of luck to you. I hope your bad experience will not be repeated.

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Hi Jihm. Many thanks for your reply. The doctor who gave me my first five injections seems more experienced than the person who gave me my last one. The only real criticism I have of him is that he is not too hot on flushing the eye afterwards. I have only had it done twice by him and that was after the very first injection and by request from the Opthamologist before the fourth one as after the third injection, I must have had some iodine left in my eye and had a nasty reaction from it - nothing to do with the injection itself. Anyway, he flushed it out after the request but the following time, again, he didn't bother. Best of luck to you too.

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My Dr. not only does the drops but puts a small amount of lidocain in the bottom lid it sure helps.

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Hi ColWi. Thanks for your response. I do have the anaesthetising drops (several, in fact,) before the injection. I had never had a problem until the last time. It was a different doctor who injected - at the top left off the eyeball - I usually have it done more half-way down on the side. Strange thing was when she said "sharp scratch" before she injected, it made me instantly suspicious and I wasn't wrong. The other doctor who usually gives me the injections has never said that and I never had any reason to complain (apart from the fact that the only times I had my eye flushed was the first time and fourth time (I had a bad after effect after the third injection which I think was where the iodine had not been flushed out - he uses a very wet iodine wipe beforehand). The doctor I see before having the injections told me that it should be flushed out after each injection but it doesn't usually happen. I don't mind providing it doesn't cause any problems. I am very nervous now as I am having my next one on Friday, 16 February and I am assuming it's going to be the same person as last time who does the injection so I am not looking forward to it. I am hoping that I will see the doctor beforehand so that I can tell him about my previous experience and hopefully, he can tell her to do it in a different place. ☹

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Yes, I think that is a great idea. It is very strange that she would say that. I am not sure I would give her another crack at my eyes. I know what you mean about the iodine. Wow can that burn if it is not flushed out. I have had that. Now I make them flush it out more than nce just to make sure. This ointment really helps afterwards. The eye drops didn't really work for me and I was in quite a bit of pain. I now use that and try not to open my eyes till I go to bed. That really seems to help me. Every time is different as to how much pain I have and the recovery. But how they do the injections stays the same. How much are you still able to see? My left eye is not much use any more. I go and see a new low vision specialist on Friday. Maybe there is something new that can be done so I can see better in the right eye.

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