Swearing therapy

"Researchers from Keele University conducted a number of initial experiments in 2009 to examine the analgesic properties of swearing. Richard Stephens, John Atkins, and Andrew Kingston published "Swearing as a Response to Pain" in NeuroReport, finding that some people could hold their hands in ice water for twice as long as usual if they swore compared to if they used neutral words. They also reported feeling less pain."

I don't know why this isn't discussed more often. I've always had a rather colourful vocabulary and now I have an excuse to use it. ;)

5 Replies

oldest โ€ข newest
  • Well, I'm gumswizzled!

  • HEAVENS TO BETSY

    ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘Œ๐Ÿ‘Œ๐Ÿ‘Œ๐Ÿ‘Œโ€ผ๏ธโ€ผ๏ธโ€ผ๏ธโ€ผ๏ธ

    BOBS YOUR UNCLE

    DAGNABBIT

  • How very ladylike - mine is FAR more colourful...

  • ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚ 20 years of working in a remote rural office with ladylike East Anglian matrons did a job on my big bad American mouth....๐Ÿ˜ but they loved those alternatives...

  • Love it! Several of us with polymyalgia rheumatica say we have far more colourful language when we are having a flare - and it is nothing to do with the pred as it happened to me pre-pred...

You may also like...