Night compression?: Hi, has anyone tried Jobst Relax... - LSN

LSN

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Night compression?

Mecinilla
Mecinilla

Hi, has anyone tried Jobst Relax night wear compression? Comfort? Effectiveness? I don’t think it’s available on prescription, and is fairly expensive, so would welcome any comments. Thanks!

21 Replies
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The arm garments are on prescription - leg garments will probably be available within the year.

Some of my clients have them, and love them, especially those with very large arms or those who are older and can’t cope with the flat knit garments any more.

Mecinilla
Mecinilla in reply to Lynora

Lynora - thank you. I have single leg, reasonably mild, lymphedema and I am trying to keep it under control as much as possible, and this was an extra possibility. It sounds as if it has been developed initially for upper limb use. It is very helpful to get feedback. Thanks again.

Not sure if you’re looking at arms or legs? I have legs which I paid for last year at HUGE expense (without VAT or extras ie zipper) is about £400.

The Jobst Relax is fairly new on the market and in my opinion has more product development to do to compete with its main night compression competition, Solaris Tribute which has been around for quite a while, has a broader night compression range/options.

I like the Relax fabric which is entirely different to Jobst Elvarex Plus or any flat-knit or circular-knit daytime compression. Relax is more comfortable (which it should be for relaxing and sleeping!).

A few cautions though -

The Jobst marketing states the Relax has gradient compression and can be worn standing although intended for wearing when sleeping/relaxing. The gradient compression is not as effective as daytime compression

Also, their marketing states the Coolmax yarns in the Relax fabric keeps the limb cool. I find that true in winter but certainly not in summer/warm weather. Other Lymphies with the leg Relax have said they find it tolerable in warm weather, I don’t.

Jobst still has teething problems with the leg Relax which their development team is working on. They have had to remake my Relax for the second time due the unresolved issues. (Jobst has absorbed the cost). The main problem has been the way they advise to measure. They initially said to measure the same way as for their Elvarex flat-knit garments. My LE Specialist Nurse at the Lymphie Clinic measures me for all my flat-knit garments so those measurements were initially used. The fit was still problematic after the first re-make, so the development team came up with a different way for my LE nurse to measure. I’m still waiting to see how the second remake works out. The fitting problem I’ve had has also been experienced by other lower extremity Lymphies. If you’re needing the leg Relax you may want to wait until it’s on the NHS tariff, by then hopefully they’ll have resolved the problems

Hidden
Hidden in reply to CCT67

loooool bla bla bla :D only sugeryy helps you more

CCT67
CCT67 in reply to Hidden

Not in my case.

It’s not the answer or even physically possible for many Lymphies while for others it is

Mecinilla
Mecinilla in reply to CCT67

Thanks - that’s helpful. My specialist lymphedema physiotherapist showed me a sample and I wondered about warmth and comfort, especially in warmer weather (even here in Scotland!). Also interesting about measurement. I printed the online Relax chart on the Jobst website and the physiotherapist did the measurements required. I think it would be best to wait before making a decision, as you suggest. I would be very interested to know how the 2nd (3rd?) version works out. Thanks again!

Hidden
Hidden

compression is not enough surgery helps more but you must choose an experienced surgeon !

Mecinilla
Mecinilla in reply to Hidden

Thanks....and Yes, compression is no fun and is only just adequate (if that!). Surgery? Yes. But expensive, and you still have to wear the no fun compression afterwards. I have thought about it - the Oxford clinic seems to have a good reputation. I can’t see the NHS making it available anytime soon.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Mecinilla

depends on surgeon and yes is possible to reduce stockings aftertime but not with oxford clinic

Califgirl2008
Califgirl2008 in reply to Hidden

Not everyone is a candidate for the surgery!!

Surgery is an option for SOME Lymphies Not everyone is a candidate for surgery. For Most Primary Lymphies LVA is not an option. Three LVA surgeons have told me that in the context of my LE when I was assessed for LVA. And VLNT is not a panacea either for all the Lymphies who’ve had it with no positive improvement. Surgery results are a very mixed bag and still considered experimental

Mecinilla
Mecinilla in reply to CCT67

Hello again! I read about LVA when I was initially diagnosed with secondary lymphedema and, of course, it was easy to think that it might be the answer. I might or might not be a suitable candidate but it does appear to be a better answer for some people than others. And all surgery has an element of risk. In the meantime I try to explore other options so thanks again for your helpful response. M

CCT67
CCT67 in reply to Mecinilla

Hi there,

LVA is more of an option for Secondary and some who’ve had LVA feel its hugely helped reduce their symptoms.

It needs to be established whether you have some functioning lymph vessels in the affected limb. If there are insufficient functioning lymph vessels then the op is not physically possible, as the op requires some working lymph vessels to connect the blood vessels to. The best way to determine suitability is to have an ICG Lymphography scan - it’s a live-time scan, quite different technology to the Lymphoscintigraphy scan which is the usual go-to scan for diagnosing Lymphoedema. ICG is not widely available on the NHS. Paying privately is an option approx £600. I know Secondary Lymphies who are thrilled with their results from LVA. I also know of those whose symptoms have not reduced at all 12 months post op. It’s a procedure that being newer hasn’t had robust clinical research with a large population sample. The surgeons who undertake LVA are very enthusiastic about it as are those for whom it’s tremendously helped.

I’m hoping my re-made Relax garments fit properly. I’ll let you know how I get on and how the measuring was adjusted to ensure no probs 😊

Hidden
Hidden

fake :D for most primary cases is possible to do a surgery ( one surgeon has good results for primary LE

CCT67
CCT67 in reply to Hidden

My dear, I have a PhD. I know all about how to undertake credible and reliable research. Though thank you for your thoughts on the matter. If you were fortunate enough to have enough working lymph vessels for LVA and funds to pay for it then count yoursrlf extremely fortunate. Wshimg you good lymphatic health

Hidden
Hidden in reply to CCT67

you can have phdp phdp but most cases are possible to do a surgery of primary LE for MLVA by one surgeon

Lynora
Lynora in reply to Hidden

Which surgeon and where is the clinic?

Califgirl2008
Califgirl2008 in reply to Lynora

This lymph91 is a moron!!

Hi lymph91....To be a candidate you have to be a) secondary lymphedema b) less than 33% body mass fat index c) still at an early stage where the skin hasn't hardened.

The information that CCT67 has written is completely accurate. I was told I wasn't bad enough, as there are risks involved. ( isuppose they could touch a nerve).

If it was that easy, we would all be having it done and not discussing overpriced ugly compression garments.

Thanks for your comment re LVA surgery. Yes - if it were that easy......! I am lucky in that the swelling is relatively mild. It sounds as if you have to be not too bad, but bad enough before surgery is a recommendable option. Meantime on with the ugly, overpriced compression.

Correct..somewhere in the middle..I might add I went NHS to a Mr Griffiths in Chelmsford ...maybe private they would have done it!?

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