How helpful was your hospital's ICU Outreach service in smoothing your transition back to the general ward when you left intensive care?

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  • Unfortunately the ward seemed to ignore what they were told from outreach and the nutritionist

    They had to be reminded by my partner

  • i didnt stay in the hospital long after ICU, i got out of the hospital as quick as i could (discharged myself), the food was awful

  • A nurse came to see me once and struggled to Nswer my questions one if which was when would my voice come back properly

  • I had no outreach at all. I went from the ICU to the gynae ward where I was discharged 3 days later. No one came to talk to me about what had happened when I had my anaesthetic or what had happened to me while I was unconscious. I got home, got into bed and cried myself to sleep.

  • Didn't know what was going on, not the day, or year, bad nightmares, and a lot of pain. My adult children were the only ones to tell me what happened, and because I was transferred to a different Hospital when I was unconscious, was really traumatic when I woke, I couldn't speak to ask questions either.

    Wanted out, and home as soon as possible. I really do know how people are bullied, I was pushed from room to room, lifted from the bed in pain, no explanation as to why.

    When I got home, only the lovely District Nurses to speak too, who also didn't know what I had gone through, obvious as to their reaction when first changing my dressings, had a VAX dressing with a 25cm wound, her poor face was so shocked, she was so sorry, she wasn't told. Looked like a slab of belly pork.

    Even my Doctor had no idea, as had not received the paper work.

    So no, never had outreach, still do not know what went on, even my sons who are down as next of kin, couldn't find out.

    Now suffering from PTSD, still waiting for treatment

  • Hi Jackie4089

    I know how you feel. I was in ICU 3 years ago and nobody told me anything. Nobody on the ward seemed to know anything about me. That I had been in ICU didn't seem to register. I was in hospital for a total of 6 weeks and couldn't get home fast enough. My GP had and still has no idea of what I went through. So it's no wonder we can feel unable to cope.

  • i never had outreach from icu i was lucky the night i went up to have my medicine from the nurse on the ward. the night i got moved up i had a full blown panic attack and the support just wasnt there

  • I had no help or advice when being moved from intensive care to a ward. When I needed help the ward staff seemed to have little understanding as to what had happened to me couldn't understand I couldn't walk amongst other things. It was so demoralising. I came home before I was able as I fellt I would be safer. On seeing my GP she had no idea what had happened, we know the paperwork had been delivered as my husband did it himself, and had little understanding of what I went through. It's hardly surprising that so many of us are suffering with some sort of after shocks.

  • The outreach girls at Worcester would visit me everyday while I was on the wards and were amazing. I had a very bad experience where a nurse told me I was faking my illness and was very rough with me. This came as quite a surprise considering I had recently left ICU after a 2 1/2 month stay and had lost 3 1/2 stone in weight. I was only capable of getting to the chair by the side of my bed with help but lucky for me the outreach team soon put her straight. :) .

    Tony

  • My dad was in ICU for 2 and a half months then transferred to a ward where he still is now 2 and a half weeks later. An ICU nurse did come over and say hello after he had been there a week as she was on the ward anyway and said his cannula needed changing and the dressing over his trache tube wound as well (she actually did that one for him there and then and told the nurse about the cannula). I don't believe the nurses on this ward know the full extent of what he has gone through or care. If I ask for an update no-one seems to know anything and can only give me info from his written notes. I'm really shocked, especially as he is in Milton Keynes Hospital where ICU steps was founded and I had read (and had high hopes) about the outreach program.

  • When I came round after being in a coma for a month on and off its a long story. I was transferred to a cardiac ward which was one of the worst experiences of my life they would not let me do anything as I was still coupled up to the oxygen this went on for a couple of days. Then all of a sudden a Physio appeared and demanded to know what was going on and why they would not let me do anything it was amazing the transformation of the nurses attitude. The Physio told me that the consultant who treated me in ICU had sent her as just because I had been discharged from them I was still a member of the ICU family & they would check on me every day to make sure I was treated ok. I could not believe they would do this for me I was asked if in a few months I would go to a follow up meeting with a consultant to see how I was coping. I later joined the ICU steps group & they still keep in touch 5years hence.

  • My husband discharged from ICU at Queens Medical Notts ten months ago.We are in Leicestershire ,there was no GP notes sent.My husband has a Trachestomy wound that needed dressing every two days.We were told on discharge to book an appointment at Gps to see a nurse.My husband was to weak to hold a toothbrush let alone go to the docs.I rang our surgery they activated a District Nurse who was an angel on earth.If it wasn't for her we wouldn't have had an Ocuppational Therapist or Physiotherapist set up.Although his care and support to his family whilst in ICU was outstanding the lack of aftercare and support on discharge was shocking ,very upsetting and very stressful to say the least.I always stand by what I said at the time,if my husband was elderly it would have been a different scenario.

  • I tried to access the ICU steps site on several occasions but it can't be reached

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