Is Full Fat Dairy Good for your Heart... - Healthy Eating

Healthy Eating
38,068 members6,438 posts

Is Full Fat Dairy Good for your Heart...

STORY AT-A-GLANCE:

A new, very large study shows that eating more full-fat dairy was linked to a lowered risk of death from cardiovascular disease, including death from cardiovascular causes, such as stroke and diabetes

While it couldn’t prove cause and effect, people in the study who ate three servings of dairy per day had an overall lower risk of death during the course of the study than people who ate no dairy at all

Cardiovascular disease is a global epidemic, with 80 percent of cases found in low- and middle-income countries

Organic, raw, grass fed and full-fat yogurt, kefir, cheese, butter and milk are examples of dairy products that contain the omega-3s, amino acids, vitamins and minerals essential to optimal health.

articles.mercola.com/sites/...

15 Replies
oldestnewest

I do agree with this article, but also agree with the first comment on the article, that if you do eat a lot of dairy, it can be detrimental nowadays, if you do not also supplement/eat enough Magnesium. Because of the poor state of our soils nowadays, there is very little Magnesium in milk, whereas there used to be more, so the balance of Magnesium to Calcium ratio was better.

2 likes
Reply

"Currently with the evidence that we have reviewed, we still believe that you should try to limit your saturated fat including fat that this is coming from dairy products." (my italics)

Well, thanks for that, Jo Ann Carson of the AHA. At least we're clear about this.

- You selectively ignore any evidence that contradicts your opinions;

- Your position has been downgraded to nothing more than a "belief" ... as opposed to a robust theory that has held up against scientific enquiry.

5 likes
Reply

Hi Dottie, this is interesting and it doesn't pull any punches over why milk is pasteurised or the antibiotics added to it.

I also think you've made another really important point about magnesium as about 60% of the population are magnesium deficient.

So these 2 things combined show how we have caused all these problems because the more sophisticated we have become as a society the more we have lost touch with our bodies real needs, so are not eating natural foods like raw milk. But have been made to believe that gratification rules and low fat low cal is the answer and it is not.

3 likes
Reply

The magnesium thing is a funny one. At least in my part of the world, the typical symptom of farmed-out soil is calcium deficiency (that is, magnesium is relatively abundant). My hunch is that it's not so much a problem with the soils but with the way animals are bred and then abused to produce the maximum possible volume of milk in the shortest possible time, with no attention paid to the quality of the product.

Apart from any possible nutritional issues, it's a completely stupid business model because you quite literally kill the goose that lays the golden eggs: the animal is exhausted and off to the knacker's yard to be turned into dog food within a couple of years. Unfortunately, economists have a peculiar talent for inventing new rules of arithmetic that cause two plus two to equal six and a half, and politicians have a peculiar talent for taking them seriously.

Reply

Hi there, magnesium deficiency in the US the EU is caused by a deficiency in the soil and its modern farming methods that are the cause, as we've depleted the soil of vital nutrients here's a couple of links, the 2nd one claims 2/3 of the population on some continents are MG deficient which can lead to other complications.

And this is in my opinion is because we have put productivity over all else, like your analogy of killing the golden goose except its 'us' that is paying the price.

scientificamerican.com/arti...

sciencedirect.com/science/a...

3 likes
Reply

Thanks for the links, but neither of those suggest that it's soil magnesium depletion per se that's the problem. Here's the important quote:

"... resulting from Mg decreases in grasses due to heavy application of potassium to soil [21]; K+ is an antagonist for Mg2 + absorption in plants."

This effect has been known for decades (although it's routinely ignored). As the author points out, the key problem is a focus on NPK and complete neglect of the complex interactions that occur in soil chemistry. In particular, the fertilizer merchants spend a lot of time trying to discredit soil theories that emphasize base saturation (relative amounts of accessible Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ or Na+) as critical for soil health, because those theories invariably recommend application of organic matter as the most effective means of maintaining fertility. And we can't have that, can we?

It's animals AND people who are paying the price. Nature is not inherently vindictive, but she will still mete out punishment if the laws of physics demand it.

3 likes
Reply

Really the more developed a country is the more over fed and under nourished the population becomes.

I realised there was a problem with magnesium after taking vitamin D last winter and getting a thumping head ache so took Mg as well and that made me aware there was something very wrong in our food chain.

2 likes
Reply

Magnesium is also needed to transfer Vitamin D from it's 'storage' to 'active' form AND taking Vitamin D without Magnesium (And K2) is very harmful and can cause no end of problems.

sciencedaily.com/releases/2...

precisionnutrition.com/stop...

1 like
Reply

Hi Dottie2011

Great to hear from you, not heard from you for a while, and thanks for sharing this article. I will look forward to reading it - and I hope you're having a good week.

Zest :-)

2 likes
Reply

Hi Zest,

Thank you, nice to be missed! ;)

Hope you enjoy the article and find it interesting. :)

1 like
Reply

There are some interesting expert reactions at sciencemediacentre.org/expe... including

- "use of dietary information collected only at baseline and then applied to long follow-up periods",

- "a key limitation in this new analysis from the PURE study is the lack of inclusion of butter and cream in the total dairy and the whole-fat dairy group",

- "The participants were relatively young so the incidence of cardiovascular disease was low",

- "In conclusion, this study has extrapolated its findings into dietary advice which does not seem justified given the limitations of the study."

2 likes
Reply

I was going to point out that the effect is so small that it suggests not that "dairy is good for you" but simply that it doesn't matter either way.

In other words, you can eat dairy products if you like them (and aren't allergic to them), but if you don't like them, or don't want to, that's neither here nor there.

The experts spend way too much time looking for tiny effects that disappear in a puff of statistics if you look at them too hard.

1 like
Reply

I completly agree with you on this point and would go on to include they did not consider grass fed milk and products you brought up. Which have been shown on the lchf diet, keto.

1 like
Reply

When I went to Aldi last week, there was no heavy cream. I asked if there might be some in the back, but it was a warehouse shortage. Wondering if the LCHF crowd is getting bigger all the time!

2 likes
Reply

maybe the government are taking more direct measures to ensure we all stick to the approved low-fat regime ;)

1 like
Reply

You may also like...