Healthy Eating
32,775 members4,669 posts

Public Health England Reports: March 2018

Hi everyone,

I thought you'd be interested in the recent reports by Public Health England:

Recent Reports from Public Health England – March 2018

Sugar reduction and wider reformulation

Contents

1. Childhood obesity plan

2. Sugar reduction

3. Calorie reduction

gov.uk/government/collectio...

Plans to cut excess calorie consumption unveiled

Steps to reduce 20% of calories in popular foods by 2024 announced to tackle childhood obesity.

gov.uk/government/news/plan...

Calorie reduction: the scope and ambition for action

Evidence on children’s calorie consumption and details of the calorie reduction programme, principally for the food industry and public health bodies.

gov.uk/government/publicati...

The 94 page document can be downloaded here:

“Calorie reduction: The scope and ambition for action March 2018”

gov.uk/government/uploads/s...

I hope you find these interesting. I just wanted to share them here in the Healthy Eating forum.

Zest :-)

Update on 8.03.18: Just added another report, which is about:

"Weight Management Interventions Standard Evaluation Framework":

gov.uk/government/publicati...

11 Replies
oldestnewest

Hi Zest, thanks for posting this and it's about time too, really we as a society have become complacent and lost focus of our nutritional needs and this is not an insult to anyone, its an observation on how we as a society have responded over the last few decades to manipulation from clever selling/adverts.

Jerry 😊

1 like
Reply

Thanks Jerry - I haven't had time yet to read these reports - but I'm glad they're available to read, and I hope to 'digest' them later. :-)

Just wanted to share them so everyone could have a read - if they've not seen them already. I know the newspapers and media will report on them, but it's great to see the original articles and reports.

Zest :-)

1 like
Reply

Thank u for sharing Zest.Very helpful..😊

2 likes
Reply

:-)

Reply

Thank you Zest. I have just downloaded the report. Interesting that it states, "There is convincing evidence that high intakes of very calorific and

energy dense foods that are high in fat and/or sugar specifically, similar to the current UK diet, increases the risk of gaining weight and becoming overweight (21-23)."

I have not had time to read the rest of the report but "high in fat" gets equal status as sugar on page 10 stands out to me. So I am interested to read why they do not call for fat reduction as well.

The full quote is "There is convincing evidence that high intakes of very calorific and

energy dense foods that are high in fat and/or sugar specifically, similar to the current UK diet, increases the risk of gaining weight and becoming overweight (21-23)."

2 likes
Reply

Thanks andyswarbs,

I am really looking forward to reading it too - although probably won't get chance till the weekend, but it's going to be good to look through.

Zest :-)

Reply

Following through on reference 23, it says, "SACN is also recommending that the dietary reference value for carbohydrates be maintained at a population average of approximately 50% of total dietary energy."

50% carb is the new recommended average... Interesting.

gov.uk/government/uploads/s...

2 likes
Reply

I see the standard dietary input is "These include foods covered by PHE’s sugar reduction programme (cakes, biscuits, breakfast cereals, yogurts, ice cream, morning goods (eg pastries and buns) confectionery (sweet and chocolate), puddings and sweet spreads and sauces) which account for about 25% of calories consumed with a further 5% coming from the drinks included in, and excluded from, the soft drinks industry levy(11, 18, 34)."

Now how much fat is in all that. Doughnuts for example are nearing 50% fat. If it wasn't for the drinks (5%) this 25% is heavily fat oriented. Any carbs in there are very poor carbs. But so far in the report they have not highlighted the bad carbs. I am looking because they should...

3 likes
Reply

Again from the report page 23,

"The National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) shows that the average UK population’s diet does not match recommendations(41) and is high in sugar, salt and saturated fat..." ... "and lower in fruit and vegetables, oily fish and fibre than is recommended" ... "In addition to obesity, the average UK diet is a leading factor in many diseases such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers."

3 likes
Reply

Hmmm...

Wonder when they'll add a whopping tax to junk food, ban advertising for "food-like" substances with no or negative nutrition, & start subsidising fresh fruit & veg as a way to ameliorate the obesity/cancer. heart disease/diabesity epidemic.

Bringing back real food cookery lessons in schools would be of enormous benefit to the "happy meal" generation that can't peel a banana. & are obsessed with television food porn.

Mx

2 likes
Reply

More coverage on this in the Express express.co.uk/life-style/he...

1 like
Reply

You may also like...