Foie Gras

It means fatty-liver, and the French are notorious for being experts in its production (and it's cruel). Centuries of experience resulted in them force-feeding corn/grains to geese or ducks. That's it. No added fat. Is dietary carbohydrate safe in high proportions? Is dietary fat a risk for visceral fat, fatty-liver or heart disease? cam.ac.uk/research/news/new...

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  • what is the question here ? are you talking about fats in diet or foie gras . There is nothing in your link about geese so why infer that goose is bad for you? as the article only states red meat could be a no no

  • It's a post, not a question bobski1. What it says to me is that current national healthy eating guidelines need a radical overhaul.

    My reference to foie gras is that the French would have used fat to cause fatty-liver if that was the best way of doing it, but their experience found that carbohydrate achieved 'superior' results.

    We know that fructose has to be processed by the liver, and any excess will emanate as visceral fat.

    We also know that high-insulin levels pre-dispose us to fat deposition, and excess insulin promotes growth of the endothelial lining of arteries, causing narrowing.

    Yet we've been advised to eat up to 65% of kcalories from carbohydrate, and cut down on fat, especially saturated fat. The rationale behind that would have to be that carbohydrate is safer than saturated fat. The evidence seems to contradict this view.

  • " Is dietary carbohydrate safe in high proportions? Is dietary fat a risk for visceral fat, fatty-liver or heart disease? "

    Sorry but this to me is a question within a post although I do see what you are alluding to.

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