Feeling low!

Hi guys just hoping for Abit of advice! I was diagnosed 3 months ago via keyhole with endo stage 4 what they call "kissing ovaries" which are then attached to my bowel pretty much his words where "worst mess I have ever seen" they have left it as me & my husband are trying for a other baby. I was lucky to fall pregnant before and have a 2 year old daughter I got my diagnosis after her. Anyone on here got pregnant with stage 4 if so how risky is it? Am I trying to hold on to the impossible in only 25 and finding it all hard to take in!

2 Replies

  • Hi - the evidence is that chances of natural conception with deep rectovaginal endo is low. The chances are reported as greatly improved with thorough excision. If your pelvic anatomy is currently very distorted with adhesions as it sounds to be then you have to think of how conception is likely to happen. It relies on the ovaries releasing an egg that can readily find its way into the Fallopian tubes to meet sperm but if your ovaries are glued together behind your uterus then this path is likely to very affected. You also have to think what would happen if you did fall pregnant when your uterus started to swell with your ovaries glued together. You probably also have what is called an obliterated Pouch of Douglas which means that the back of the cervix/vagina is glued to the front of the bowel. This is likely to cause pregnancy to be very painful and delivery difficult as the cervix wouldn't be able to dilate normally. On top of all this endometriotic lesions themselves have their own hormonal cycle that favours progesterone resistance which means that the progesterone needed to maintain an embryo may be lower than it should be. It does seem that your best chance is to have a thorough excision of your endo by a specialist centre and then take advantage of the window of opportunity it would give you. You are still young and I think this is your best course. Click on my name and have a look at my post on POD endo and on how to find a specialist. Also have a look at sections 2.4 and 3.2 of the guidelines below that underpin NHS treatment and cover deep endo surgery and fertility. x


  • Thank you for your response it's frustrating as even though I have seen a consultant I was never told any of that they seem to just send us on our way like its no big deal, and what you said makes sense as when I was preganant before I didn't know at that point I had Endo but got a lot of weird pains, then she was early and Ended up being induced as I wasn't dilating it's amazing now that they didn't spot it years ago! Xx

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