From 10k to half Marathon in 9 or so weeks?

A friend is doing a half marathon towards the end of March and I think I've been convinced to join her! My question is whether anyone has any hints/tips to help me get ready for it?

I usually run a couple of times a week along with swimming, boxercise and pilates. I can run 10k and have occasionally gone up to 11/12k but no more...and the thought of doing twice that and a bit more is pretty terrifying!

Also had a few back/hamstring problems in the last few weeks but had it all checked out and just been advised to stretch a lot more and maybe try sports massage.

So any advice from all of you wonderful people - I'd be very, very grateful! :)

4 Replies

oldestnewest
  • I have done one 10km run only and I am doing a half marathon on 10 May, I am using the free Asics tailor made training plan. So far it all seems fine and I feel confident, if that is any help. Good luck and always remember the most important thing is to have fun. I love training for something, it's the best bit.

  • Yes, shouldn't be a problem. Even if you just built up 1k a week on your long runs you'd reach distance in that time.

  • Core strength is crucial for longer runs, which swimming and pilates should address, but you might want to focus on that a bit more than usual. Good luck.

  • I did exactly that last spring. I found it wasn't so much the distance as the time. It took me 2h27 when I got there and it takes a lot of concentration to be out on the road for that length of time. The first thing was to make 10k "my distance". I ran it regularly (and still do). The second thing, and most importantly for me was to remove doubt. I planned a half marathon distance on the roads near home and made sure that i ran the whole thing in short sections, say 10, 11 or 12k sections as the weeks went by. In particular I waged to know where the inclines were so I was prepared for them. Every week I had one run where I upped the longest distance a little. 16k is more or less 10 miles which is a good place to get to. Once I'd done that then mentally, the half marathon at 13.1 miles was "just another" 5k on top, and I'm guessing, like me, you can probably do those without thinking. The final run was then a matter of putting the sections together, picking my time and doing the whole thing in one go. It wasn't easy, but if you can get your head round it and plan it, it's definitely possible for someone happy with 10k as a regular run.

You may also like...