Thinking of joining the 21st Century - what ipod app is the best for running?

Am finally thinking of getting an iphone, but wondering which running app everyone finds the best (because this is one of the main reasons that I want to get one!!!). We potentially have dodgy reception (GPS and phone) where I live so wondered which apps seem to be the best, and which cope best with this? Any thoughts/experiences?

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  • Hi Unfitmum,

    There's quite a few different apps - I had Map My Walk before starting to run and have found it suits my needs (you can also get a Map My Run version, but I have kept MMW as they are both essentially the same thing - you can log any type of exercise). It breaks down the speed for each kilometre and shows inclines etc. I've had no problems with signal - it locks on right away despite being in a part of South Devon where phone signal can be an issue.

    Others use Endomondo, Runkeeper, Nike - its probably worth trying a couple and seeing which works best for you.

  • I use Runkeeper. I'm still on the programme, on week 8 and don't quite like the music on the c5k app, so I use Runkeeper which tracks distance and time and allows my own playlist :-) I miss Laura's voice, but the Runkeeper app speaks to you after every 5 minutes or so, advising you of your time and distance. And it's free to download (well, it was when I got it a couple weeks back). Also performs very well in my area with dodgy reception :-)

  • I've been using Runkeeper too and switched to this in week eight so that I could use my own music but still have the app keep time for me. It's worked well for me and I like the route mapping function that comes on the website.

    Strangely though today it had a funny turn and told me I had completed 14.5 k at an average pace of just 2mins 25 seconds! I'm waiting for a call from the Olympic selectors now. ;-)

  • I use iSmoothrun Pro, I think it's about £3 but it's hugely customisable, works with heart rate monitors, it records cadence and best of all uploads to most fitness sites (nike, runkeeper, strava, daily mile, garmin etc) and it even saves TCX / GPX files to dropbox do you can upload to any others.

  • Phone reception and GPS reception are completely different things so I wouldn't worry about dodgy phone reception being an issue. Global Positioning signal is received from satellites so there are no significant blackspots anywhere on earth. Signal is only affected by what is between the satellites and you on the ground, so obviously it can't be used inside a building, but occasionally thick cloud will weaken the signal and cause the receiver to take a little longer to lock onto satellites. Other than that, there aren't really any places which should be large areas of poor GPS reception. Exceptions would be in the centre of a large area of skyscrapers, but we don't really have large areas like that in the UK!! for the average person here, it is the weather that affects GPS signal, not where they live.

  • I use sportstracker. Maps the run, measures speed and distance, works on foot, bike, whatever. And is free. My favourite price.

  • Thanks for all the replies. Interesting comments about GPS - our TomTom can often take 20mins to find where we are at home (but I now realise that this may be more of a problem with the TomTom as opposed to the GPS!!). Still havent splashed out yet ... but beginning to think it may be soon ...

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