No Danger in Red Meat: Listening to the... - Cholesterol Support

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No Danger in Red Meat

Mike4550
Mike4550
17 Replies

Listening to the radio it seems the dangers of red meat have been vastly exaggerated. So it's just a case of sticking to low fat ones and avoiding the overly processed junk! Good news!

17 Replies
oldestnewest
Springray

We all like to hear good news about our less good habits, don't we?

This news report is like authorities saying "we won't say wear a helmet on a motorbike because most people won't have an accident, and so that some people can enjoy the sensation of wind in their hair, we will leave it open to all"

What would you rather have...life or that mouth sensation of eating bacon and sausages?

Red and processed meats are clearly linked to cancer and heart disease.

As always, your choice. Make it an informed choice though.

My cholesterol plummeted so fast when I gave up meat, eggs, dairy, fish and oil that I no longer needed medication. Same for my blood pressure. I would never go back to a life of medication now. I feel too alive. Wholefood plantbased diet for the win.

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sandybrown

Human body produces 80% of cholesterol for the body to function. 20% if from what goes in through the mouth!

Enjoy one life!

2 likes
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Springray

Everyone can make their own choices.

I prefer to live a long and healthy life.

1 like
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sandybrown

Thank you.

healthline.com/nutrition/pl...

Would it be possible for you to give lipid numbers before and after for members benefit?

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Springray

At diagnosis TC 5.76

After WFPB diet TC 3.2

Without medication.

I am not alone. Many other such stories.

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sandybrown

Thank you.

Would it be possible for you to give examples of lunch and dinner diet?.

For me I am trying to avoid breakfast.!!

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Springray

Go to Forks Over Knives website and PCRM.org. They have sample meals.

Simply put, try taking out the meat, dairy or egg component from your curries and stews Then add-in beans or lentils instead. Same flavours, different protein source.

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Bet117
Bet117
in reply to Springray

I use red kidney beans, black beans, chick peas and lentils in many dishes. My chilli has no meat in it. We order vegetarian curries when having dinner in our favorite Indian restaurant as well.

My husband has become accustomed to not having the meats and prefers it to the beef that he was raised on.

We eat porridge or toast / a bagel with hummus and fresh onion and peppers for breakfast which is delicious.

Give it a try!

1 like
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Markl60
Markl60
in reply to Springray

Those numbers are pretty meaningless unless you break them down. At the very least you should quote TC, HDL, Trigs and LDL

It would also help to know Lp(a) levels

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Rob6868
Rob6868
in reply to Springray

Your living in the past

Blaming cholesterol for everything when it's inflammation that is the root cause..too low cholesterol is also an issue..Everyone to there own opinion but I'm going low carb high fat thanks because by now we should all realise it's the crap cards causing the issue NOT the poor cholesterol...Try listening to Dr malcom kendrick and the great cholesterol con...we have been fobbed off for decades with millions of people on statins that don't need them...It's not all about plant Base..

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KatyB
KatyB
in reply to Springray

I think a lot depends on your family genes, my father-in-law lived to 95 and ate meat three times a day. My husband and his brother love their meat, have low cholesterol, very low blood pressure and are over weight. I'm the complete opposite, eat very little meat, not over weight, very active yet have high cholesterol and high blood pressure.

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Springray
Springray
in reply to KatyB

I have terrible genetics. Many close family members died before age 60 of heart attacks. Yet thankfully the WFPB diet has brought my cholesterol back down and my BP.

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ashleyout

I'm waiting for a month or two when they say they were all wrong, and we will all die a horrible death again after one fillet steak.

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sos007
sos007Ambassador

The health issue associated with red meat has little to do with cholesterol and more to do with homocysteine production.

Read this from the Life Extension website:

"Homocysteine is an amino acid made from a common dietary amino acid, methionine, that inflicts damage to the inner arterial lining (endothelium) and contributes to many diseases:

cardiovascular disease

congestive heart failure

stroke

migraines

age-related macular degeneration

hearing loss

brain atrophy

Alzheimer’s disease

Dietary and Lifestyle Changes

Several dietary and lifestyle changes can help reduce chronic inflammation:

Avoid methionine-rich foods like RED MEAT and dairy products

.

Exercise, as patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program showed a reduction in homocysteine from exercise alone

.

Decrease or eliminate alcohol and smoking.

Source: lifeextension.com/protocols...

So to determine your optimal personal consumption level of red meat you should measure homocysteine when doing your blood work.

"After age 50, a more practical target value for homocysteine is <8 µmol/L. Depending upon other factors, you may require larger-than-usual intakes of B vitamins to achieve a healthy blood level of homocysteine."

lifeextension.com/protocols...

I also add that animal proteins are calorically dense foods which means lots of calories in small quantities. As such, they should be limited to no more than 3 oz. per day.

I personally alternate eating vegetarian one day and having some animal protein the next.

I usually have cold-water fish such as wild-caught salmon, trout, or arctic char during my animal protein days, and throw in chicken, one day per week. I will have red meat infrequently, 'on occassion'. I probably average once per month for red meat.

Good luck to all.

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Marz
Marz
in reply to sos007

They are talking about removing age-related from Macular Degeneration as it is happening when folks are younger. Another diet related condition ... check out Professor Chris Knobbe.

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sos007
sos007Ambassador
in reply to Marz

Great, thank you.

1 like
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Marz
Marz
in reply to sos007

I have the early stages so did my research and communicated with him. He eventually agreed with me that mine was an absorption issue due to gut TB - Crohns and Hashimotos - resulting in multiple surgeries rather than poor diet. He said he had not covered that aspect in his book - oh dear !

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