Low TG - High LDL: Hi, wonder if there's... - Cholesterol Support

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Low TG - High LDL

timotur
timotur

Hi, wonder if there's anything else I can do to lower persistently high LDL. I've switched to plant/fish/nuts over the last 6-9 months, and LDL won't go below about 135.

Here are my numbers from a July blood sample:

TC: 208 HDL: 65 TG: 41 LDL-C: 122 (non-HDL: 143)

Also, I had the NMR test in May, and the numbers were:

LDL-C: 135

LDL-P: 1330 High (range for high: 1300 -1599)

Small LDL-P: 333 (median cutoff < = 527)

LDL size: 21.6 (median cutoff => 20.5, falls into large pattern A range)

I don't think I can eat much healthier, and get plenty of exercise.

Thanks!

14 Replies
oldestnewest

Why are you worried, those numbers look fine, your LDL is not high and your ratios look OK. Who has told you that those numbers are of concern. Your Trig's are low and your HDL is high, stop worrying

TG:HDL ratio is considered a best indicator of heart disease. You have TG:HDL ratio of 0.63 which is excellent. Optimal TG:HDL is 0.5 - 1.9.

NMR test, is it freely available?

Just keep doing what you are doing and enjoy one life!

timotur
timotur
in reply to sandybrown

Yes, you can schedule it through walkinlab.com

sos007
sos007Ambassador

Thank you for providing your lab results.

Has your body weight normalized since your change in diet and lifestyle?

What is the nature and frequency of your exercise?

Are you sleeping at least 7.5 hours per night?

Are you experiencing more stress than normal?

Have you considered intermittent fasting?

Take a look at these 2 videos:



You can find valuable information in this link:

health.harvard.edu/heart-he...

"LDL cholesterol. The LDL measurement is usually considered the most important for assessing risk and deciding on treatment.

The definition of a healthy level keeps on getting lower. For people at low risk of heart disease, an LDL of less than 100 is desirable, However, people at higher risk of heart disease, an LDL of less than 70 or perhaps even lower is considered "optimal." Some experts say that an LDL of less than 70 would be a healthy LDL goal for all of us.

Your LDL is computed by plugging the measurements for total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides into a:

LDL = Total cholesterol – HDL – (Triglycerides ÷ 5).

LDL can also be measured directly in a non-fasting blood sample.

You have to fast for about 10 hours before the test because triglyceride levels can shoot up 20%–30% after a meal, which would throw off the equation.

Alcohol also causes a triglyceride surge, so you shouldn't drink alcohol for 24 hours before a fasting cholesterol test."

Thanks for all the responses. The reason I'm concerned with persistently high LDL (> 100) is that I have prostate cancer, and high cholesterol is implicated as a factor for PCa progression/remission. My LDL seems stuck at 135 no matter what I do. I was wondering if there is anything else I do to lower LDL as I finish radiation treatment and hopefully enter remission.

pdfs.semanticscholar.org/2c...

I do some intermediate fasting, although there is a study that actually causes LDL to go up.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/1...

I exercise a lot (running, tennis, weights), sleep is ok, about 6.5 hrs/night, and don't drink alcohol.

Londinium
Londinium
in reply to timotur

You're hopefully maintaining optimal Vitamin D3 levels all year round, particularly as you have cancer. grassrootshealth.net/wp-con...

timotur
timotur
in reply to Londinium

Yes, for the most part, I’m out in the sun a lot playing sport, but I need to recheck my Vit D 25-hydroxy to see if I’m still in range.

Londinium
Londinium
in reply to timotur

Optimal, not just "in range".

I had prostate cancer, I was on statins at the time. Is the study that you are referring to that links prostate cancer with high LDL an observational study, as those with"high LDL" are likely to be prescribed statins. Is this just another side effect of statins?

There’s a couple things:

1) comparing lipids in PCa vs BPH, —- LDL vs VHDL vs TG vs HDL...

Total cholesterol level was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in PCa (148.42±23.37) patients as compared to BPH patients (122.48±23.31), and a higher cholesterol level was observed in high grade PCa group (148.42±23.3) in comparison to low-grade PCa patients (149±23.4). HDL was insignificantly higher (p=0.08) in PCa patients (32.02±6.71) as compared to BPH patients (30.29±6.95), and an insignificantly higher HDL level was observed in high grade PCa group (32.02±6.01) in comparison to low grade PCa group (30.8±7.8). The triglyceride level was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in PCa (165.79±31.52) patients in comparison to BPH patients (111.99±22.30), but triglyceride level was insignificantly higher in (165.3±27) high grade PCa in comparison to low grade PCa patients (166±38.9). LDL was insignificantly (p>0.05) higher in PCa patients (64.14±27.57) in comparison to BPH patients (61.96±19.81), and LDL level was insignificantly higher in high grade PCa group in comparison to low grade PCa group. The VLDL level was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in PCa patients (31.66±7.68) in comparison to BPH patients (23.10±11.00).

2) statins inhibiting PCa progression—.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

IMO, #1 says don’t worry about LDL, and #2 says take a statin anyway to interfere with PCa metabolic pathways.

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