What causes triglycerides?

This is a post, despite the title, because it is a rhetorical question.

Let's start with fatty liver disease. The French have mastered the production of this in ducks and geese, as foie gras. Do they feed them saturated fat? No.

Now consider how fat deposition is encouraged in cattle. I watched the series 'Mud, Sweat, and Tractors' that concluded today, focussing on beef. They use barley to speed up size acquisition, in the form of fat, and graze cattle on grass to marble the beef. Feeding adult bulls on saturated fat from other cattle lost credibility with the BSE crisis; lean cuts were in vogue then, and the taste suffered as a consequence the programme related.

Japanese wagyu beef is extremely expensive, the demand being driven by its exceptional marbling. They are purely grass fed; no saturated fat in their feed at all.

6 Replies

  • Agreed. I cannot understand why people with access to the web just don't get it.

    It's really easy to cut triglycerides, increase HDL, decrease small dense LDL, lower blood pressure, increase insulin sensitivity - decrease diabetes medicine (maybe even stop it!) etc. That's not to mention weight loss - the holy grail!

    Keep carbohydrate to a minimum!

    People generally get the 'cut the carbs' thing, in a kind of fuzzy way of thinking, however the fear of saturated fat is so deeply ingrained, they cut that as well, and as a consequence are ravenously hungry all the time.

    Failure to appreciate the benefits of eating the delicious fats of our ancestors as a lifestyle change rather than a temporary 'diet' means lowering carbohydrate is generally doomed to failure.

  • By far the commonest cause of hyperlipidaemia is diet. That's what this thread is aimed at.

  • All,

    I am confused!, may be an explanation is necessary to the two triglycerides and hyperlipidaemia. Food to avoid as well.

  • This is the link for NHS Choices' Hyperlipidaemia:


    Triglycerides are body fat; three fatty acids joined by a carbohydrate backbone. Control your carbs and you control triglycerides.

  • I agree to Bala

  • To quote Dr Malcolm Kendrick "No wonder everyone is confused when the terminology used is completely bonkers". To my mind the terms hypercholesterolaemia and hyperlipidaemia are interchangeable, at least to us poor patients, maybe not to lipidologists.

    Whatever you may think of Dr Kendrick his explanation of the different types of lipoprotein on pages 27, 28 and 29 of " The Great Cholesterol Con" are very clear and I presume it is accurate.

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