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Vaccine for Extremely Clinically Vulnerable People

Joseph260268 profile image

Vaccine for Extremely Clinically Vulnerable People’s Family living in the same house.

Good afternoon everyone, I was recently asked in Clinic if I had received my 1st Vaccine yet, as I fall into the above category, I answered yes to my chest specialist question. He then went on to ask me - he thought it would have be sensible to vaccinate their family members within the same house also? i.e wife and daughter?

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

Have a lovely afternoon everyone.

48 Replies

They will all get it eventually its just a matter of waiting. But that is why we are told to continue to shield and be carefull. It would be good if they done all familys at the same time but we have to prioritise the vunrable first. Personally i would do those that have to work to keep things going first then the vulnerable 😷

Thank you 🙏

Well, I have and the answer is yes! It doesn't make sense to me to not jab any other adult in the house, particularly if they are carers or have to go out shopping or work etc. I think it depends on the age of any children though, as they don't seem to be wanting to do the children yet for quite a while, as the children we are told do not seem to contract this or suffer it as badly as adults. We have only their word for this!

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Annie31

Thank you for your reply my daughter is 16 years of age. 🙏

That’s a interesting question, my dad is cev and had the first jab, my mum who is his carer hasn’t had it yet, both late 60s, she’s down as his carer at the gp.

Thank you for your reply 🙏

Annie31 profile image
Annie31 in reply to Joseph260268

Well as they seem to think that there has been more transmission in senior schools as opposed to primary, you would think your daughters age group would be classed as adult in this case. I think probably all ages in senior school from 11-18 will be done at the same time so she will have to wait I would imagine.

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Annie31

Thank you 🙏

Pete has had his first jab but I, as his carer, am still waiting. We have our 38 year old son here too and he works. He won’t be vaccinated for ages. I am registered at my GP Surgery as Pete’s carer. It’s fine though as we don’t go anywhere. Xxx

Annie31 profile image
Annie31 in reply to sassy59

I don't understand their thinking on this at all Sassy! I can remember having the smallpox vax as a child - my Mum was a seamstress in the local district hospital and my Dad, myself and my Gran who lived with us all had to be vaccinated together as did every other family who had any connection to the NHS. I would have thought family units would have been one way to go when the cev people were considered most at risk whether in care homes, private homes or anywhere.

sassy59 profile image
sassy59 in reply to Annie31

I know Annie and agree but the GP surgery are having none of it. It just means I’ll be well behind Pete when he has his second jab. It also means Pete can go out and about before me which is mad! He wouldn’t dare. Lol.

Take care xxxx

Annie31 profile image
Annie31 in reply to sassy59

You too Sassy! Looks like we're all in this for the long haul anyway. This vaccine is not foolproof by any means and it seems to me there are an awful lot of people who think life will be returning back to normal when they have had the jab when clearly that will not be the case. That's what I find scary!

sassy59 profile image
sassy59 in reply to Annie31

I totally agree Annie. It’s still scary to us too. Xxxx💖

Charlie_G profile image
Charlie_G in reply to Annie31

Annie, see my reply below - it may help with understanding the rationale a little bit.

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Annie31

Thank you for your thoughts 🙏

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Annie31

Thank you 🙏

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to sassy59

Thank you 🙏

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to sassy59

Thank you 🙏

As I understand it, it’s being done purely on clinical vulnerability out of genuine necessity. If you shared a home with someone else CEV or aged over 70, they would also be vaccinated, and as they work through the priority groups other household members will be vaccinated in turn relative to their age and any clinical needs, but the argument is that the vaccine is to prevent severe illness and death, not transmission, and supply is currently limited due to the nature of what’s happened and that manufacturing can only occur at a set pace. Completely excluding the roughly 4 million healthcare workers and paid carers in care homes that are also being vaccinated at the same time, there are around 10.3 million people over the age of 70 or clinically extremely vulnerable and in need of vaccination within priority groups 1 to 4, so that’s 10.3 million first doses required to protect those individuals considered most at risk of severe illness or dying. If every person on average lived with one other individual not in priority group 1 to 4, suddenly you need 20.6 million first doses. But what if the average is two people? Three? Suddenly, instead of 10.3 million doses, you might actually need 30 million first doses to vaccinate every household containing someone in group 1 to 4, and the reality is that there just isn’t that volume of vaccine readily available at this point in time. It’s not a direct comparison by any stretch, but to put the numbers in to some kind of perspective, over the whole 2019-2020 flu season, 14 million flu vaccines were given in the U.K., with the vaccine manufacturers requiring 6 to 9 months to make and quality control that total volume of vaccine doses. If you take that into account, along with the worldwide nature of the pandemic and the much larger population requiring vaccination, I certainly feel like the volume of covid vaccine that’s been produced to date is not far off a miracle.

All of the above is why the tack being taken - not just here, but pretty much worldwide - is that if you’ve vaccinated the person in the household that’s most likely to be severely ill or die if they catch covid, then you’ve minimised the biggest risk to life, and the chances of overwhelming the NHS with severely ill patients. Obviously, some people that catch covid and are very ill or die don’t have any underlying health issues, and may also be below 50, but this is a small minority of severe and fatal cases, so the current priority has to be those that they categorically *know* to be at most risk. The best analogy I could think of spur of the moment is this: if a boat with insufficient lifeboats is sinking, and you know half the passengers will almost certainly be safely able to swim to shore, but the other half will almost certainly die if they try, do you keep families together on principle, or restrict the use of the boats to only those that can’t make the swim?

Thank you for your reply 🙏

Annie31 profile image
Annie31 in reply to Charlie_G

Thanks Charlie, I do understand the rationale for the most part over the rollout of the vaccination but it doesn't make me like it any the less! What I find really scary is there are so many people out there who have this misconception about the vaccine and that it's a cure-all and everything is going to be hunkydory. A lot of people do not understand this is not going to prevent transmission however many times the medical bods on TV try to get this across and we will all have to live with the repercussions of continued rulebreaking. I don't think there will be an end to this anytime soon.😣. I do hope your little one is feeling better today, best wishes to both of you!

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Annie31

Thank you for your reply 🙏

No Im in the same group as you, my husband hasn’t had his jab yet got to wait till it’s his turn luckily he’s in group 5 x

Thank you for your reply 🙏

Iam in same group had mine my sons live with me my youngest works with the homeless so he had his my other is 46 don't know when he will have his

Thank you for your reply 🙏

Agree totally! 👍

Thank you 🙏

I'd say yes, your still vulnerable until it takes hold. Why still have other family members putting us at risk..

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Keem59

Thank you for your reply 🙏

Hello Joseph, I have COPD and Asthma and was identified as clinically extremely vulnerable and had my vaccine in January. However, my wife who is 53 and has no underlying health issues was also invited at the same time to be vaccinated. I think we were very fortunate as this it appears to be the exception rather than the norm.

thank you for your reply 🙏

We just have to follow the list but I wonder why all people with a respiratory aren't in group 4 as our lungs are definitely compromised already . x

Thank you 🙏

It would make sense but we r told to continue hands facr space,shielding etc.but i also agree with the governments criteria, and believe they should follow that,imo,in case any supply problems arise down the line,older and cev have to be the ones who alone do have priority

Hi Joseph260268 I think that’s a brilliant idea. Well done to that specialist 😉

Thank you 🙏

I think I would ask the GP. Or the pharmacy if that's where you have yours. They may have extra spaces and vaccine to use.

Thank you 🙏

How lovely if you can get it.I'm shielding with someone who has been vaccinated - and as I'm sole carer (I and other carers we have been moved from group 7 to group 6, as there is no one to look after her the person if the carer is ill( I think ). They are vaccinating really fast now so it will only be a matter of weeks for most of us now anyway - so if we can stay at home and get food delivered I think we will all be much safer soon.

Thank you for your reply 🙏

Fudge57 profile image
Fudge57 in reply to Response

If you are with someone who is vulnerable. Did you sign up on line, to be in the priority group to get a delivery slot for food delivery on line??? It's via a Government website.

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Fudge57

Hi there,

I am the extremely clinically vulnerable person. I didn’t sign up for food delivery.

Fudge57 profile image
Fudge57 in reply to Joseph260268

Check out the information on the Government website and they should be able to point you in the direction where you can sign up. You will need your NHS number, I think. Then the Government tell all of the supermarkets who you are. Then, sign up for an account. If you don't have one already. Then, you can get priority slots. For your delivery. As, I am Disabled, I prefer Tescos. I have found them to be the only Supermarket that will take my shopping into the kitchen and put some on the kitchen worktop for me. The other's will only leave it at the door. I, can't lift the heavy bags.

Joseph260268 profile image
Joseph260268 in reply to Fudge57

Thank you so much. 🙏

Response profile image
Response in reply to Fudge57

Yes (from me) - I signed up in the first lockdown when it was impossible to get food delivery slots but now it's really easy.

According to the government site carers of cevs can get their vaccination in group 6.

Thank you 🙏

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