Stanford researchers explain how huma... - British Lung Foun...

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Stanford researchers explain how humanity has ‘engineered a world ripe for pandemics’

2greys
2greys

A pandemic can strike at any time. It takes little more than the right roll of genetic dice in a virus circulating among animals, followed by a chance encounter with a person or some go-between species, like pigs or mosquitoes. But as the new coronavirus whips around the world with a speed matched by few of the infectious diseases that have emerged in modern times, it poses the question: Why now?

news.stanford.edu/2020/03/2...

7 Replies
oldestnewest

Oh lordy 😕

2greys
2greys
in reply to Hanne62

Once mankind has got through this, the world is going to have to be a very different place. International travel will have to be curtailed, maybe as a financial result even, as airlines themselves will be going to the wall.

The aircraft lying idle so long will all have to be serviced at great expense before they can fly again, if ever, as engine components will corrode and need replacing. The stress on the wings from resting so long on their undercarriages etc. Many aircraft will be going to their graveyards.

That is just one result of this pandemic.

Hanne62
Hanne62
in reply to 2greys

I’m hoping the G7 leaders will have a rethink & decide to address climate change properly. If only China would come on board that’d be a result

Scientists rather than trying to understand, they resorted to easier way by blaming humanity. In the end, they cleverly shifted blame from their incapability to do good science to the fragility of the human race. the truth is science is not there. why 95% of patient survived while 5 percent died.

If the past is any indicator, the lung disease vaccine-like BCG and FLU vaccine failed, so will be the covid-19. the need of the hour is good science, not empty rhetoric.

Many years ago I attended an infection control course. I am having to take my socks off to count the number of years but it was over 30 years ago. One lecture was about the 1918 flu. The lecturer stated that this will happen again. It is not a case of if but when. He said it may not be a virus it could be bacterial but it will happen. Given the right mutation along with the right vectors. it is a certainty and given the social density it will not with a speed never seen before.

We have a lot to answer for about how we treat the planet and the natural world. Hopefully some good will come out of this.

Corin

X

Read this and just thought yes. Whether we will change anything remains to be seen. Luckily my generation is on he way out, so up to others to work out how they want to go forward. If you think about it, we used to have regular wars as well as smallpox, polio, German measles and many others that kept the population well culled.

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