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British Lung Foundation
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Inhaler

Does anyone use a salt inhaler or something of the sort to help breathing? Or am I grasping at straws

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I nebulise hypertonic saline. Saline is not used to help with breathing but to assist with loosening up the mucus within the lungs to help you cear it.

You don’t say what condition you have. Best to see a doc re getting the right inhaler.

Cx

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I use a salt pipe and a salt lamp when I get a cold or throat infection. It helps it clear up a little quicker.

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I agree Hun xxxx

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Got one daughter bought me one for Christmas. Tried once very salty. Not tried since

My friend swears by it. I dont like change.

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Hi I don't know if the salt cave is what your are taking about. Yes it help with breathing but can be expensive as it about 35 per shot. I have tryed it and it help me there are all so salt lamps which you can buy. Good luck

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Yes, I do. A Ceramic Pipe with Himalayan salt, it is a 5 year Pipe, been using it for 3 years now, Works for me, every Morning & Evening. My Consultant knows, she has not said not too. When I am in Hospital, I use it there, it acts as a Nebuliser. xxx

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How does a ceramic pipe help please?. And where do you get them. My mucus is so sticky. Is it something you breathe in?

Thanks joanna

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Hi Joanna,I bought mine from a Health Shop, you can order from amazon also. Just Breathe in as you would when doing Breathing Exercises. It helps with my Breathing ,the reason why I use it. I do my Stats every Morning. I take Carbocistiene for Mucus, they work, ask your GP or Consultant. Good luck Hun. xxx

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Thanks hacienda

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I paid about £25, they may have gone up in price now. xxxxx

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I got a salt inhaler by mail order, and use it sometimes when the mucous seems a bit claggy. I don't really know whether it works as the problem might go of its own accord, but there is some evidence that they do work. This relates to the osmotic effect of the salt in the lungs drawing fluid into them and thinning the mucous. The same can be said of sea air, which has always been considered good for the lungs, but you have to be careful, as one asthmatic advised, because dampness can worsen asthma symptoms in some people - however, that shouldn't be a problem with salt inhalers.

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