Elephant Feet: Or furniture risers... - British Lung Foun...

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Elephant Feet

Or furniture risers. Having seen my GP about my new problem of reflux. He has advised me to raise the head of my bed and that long term Omeprazole is not advisable because it causes Osteoporosis.

What height should I raise the head of my bed by?

The worse time for my reflux is straight after I have eaten, which is horrible and as such I cannot even drink anything to wash the burning acid back down for fear of bringing yet more acid up after. Is there anything other than PPI's that can help. I have spent a long time building up my weight and I do not want to lose it again just because of the fear of eating a proper meal.

All caused by the increased corticosteroids in my inhaler, which has improved my breathing, I do not want to give that up either. All a vicious circle.

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It is a vicious circle! I have been sucking lanzaprozole since 2012 when my oesophagus split due to acid over several years. Up to that point I had cameras down, swallowing tests, standing xrays with fizzy stuff. Everybody, including a very expensive private guy found nothing. Finally I was blue lighted to the local hospital ( blood everywhere) and luckily for me their gastro lead was on duty. They stopped the bleeding and started the labzaprozole twice each day. An almost instant improvement. Now I only suck one at night. I would rather risk the osteoporosis than another split oesophagus! Because of the type and place of my lung damage I find it difficult to breathe if I sleep propped up, even though I have an electric bed. I do recommend that you get one though then you can adjust it to the most comfortable height for you. Don’t forget to get the vat back!

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Arrrrh, we just bought new beds about 6/8 weeks ago. I think I will have to experiment a little.

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The say raise your bed by one brick either side .My consultant has put me on ranitidine along with the omeprazole which by the way I have taken for 27 years but only just started taking ranitidine I have Barrett s and hAd endoscopy every 12 months until I was 70 then I refused to have anymore because they wouldn’t operate on me so what was the point

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Hopefully "I will grow out of it" (The reflux not the bed).

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Tricky, this one 2gs. I have tried blocks under the bed, a bed rest on the mattress, varies shaped pillows. I now have an electric bed so can raise the head section to comfort level, but I admit I'm using the remote during the night which upsets the old man. Lol another annoying thing is you get the upper half comfy and the legs start swelling. At least the bile stays down hope you get sorted Jane .

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Causes osteporosis? Does it indeed, nobody told me that. I don't know how much etc. My gp said worldwide it was one of the most presribed meditcations so it can't be that bab. I have one every morning and a ran something at night as i was waking up with indegestion, the consultant said it was better than rennie etc. It's fixed my problem.

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Im sure it would say this on the patient leaflet - people should always read these. Because the acid is being diluted it is less effective for absorption of nutrients including calcium. I take Vit D3, Vit K2 and magnesium to compensate - they work with calcium and seem to be doing the job.

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Hi

Six inches, or 30degrees.

inclinedbedtherapy.com

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Thank you. That can be achieved by staking two of these together, which are cheap enough to experiment with:

argos.co.uk/product/6313478

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This is a great shop, it’s got so many things. I didn’t notice if it’s got an adjustable back rest, I have one of them, it looks like the top third of an old fashioned camp bed, you can adjust it to whatever angle suits you. It’s a relatively cheap way around it. Also I bought a wedge pillow but I’m not getting on too well with it. I found putting it under my feet was actually really comfortable but I kept kicking it out of bed which knocked everything over 🙄

2greys I’m sorry to know you’ve got this new problem of reflux on top of everything else, I hope you can find something that helps.

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I had no trouble with acid until I was put on airflusal. I complained it was burning me, but they just kept saying it was the same as seretide which I had no trouble with. I haven't found omeprazole that affective on its own. As I don't think I am making too much acid per sa . I take peptic liquid after every meal and before bed. Which seems more effective for me. Don't know about raising the bed though.

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So sorry you are struggling with reflux. I recorded some time ago Truth or Scare, part of which was about mindfullness which I saved for my daughter and part was about PPIs for myself. The GP stated that all GPs have been notified about the issues with PPIs, osteoporosis being one of them.

You may know or not that I was on Esomeprazole 20mg for some years and because of the problems with IBS, SIBO and bile malabsorption (which complicate my life much more than does bronch and is more unpredictable) I changed to Omeprazole 10mg.

I see a GI consultant but last time I saw my resp con I asked him about PPIs and he has arranged for me to have a test where they put in thin tube nasally and your acid levels are recorded and you go back the next day to have tube removed. I had to come off PPIs for 7 days, which I was dreading as I have tried to come off them before and it was hurrendous. I could have Ranitidine (which suppresses acid but works in a different way to PPIs) until 48hours before or normal (not advanced Gaviscon) but now nothing. It hasn’t been as bad as I thought it would be. I have it done tomorrow. My con stated the three things which contribute to the dreadful GI problems are abs, PPIs and steroids. Apart from occasional, but not anymore, steroid injections for arthritis and occasional doses of steroids for asthma I try and steer clear of them.

The problem for people coming off PPIs is that you can get an acid rebound, which can last up to 2 weeks or more, although not everyone will experience this.

6” is the right height. I put blocks I got from Amazon, similar to the ones on your link, on the single bed, but my bed is more difficult as it’s a double made up of 2 horzontal bases, so in effect 4 wheels either side half way down the bed.

Hope you get sorted out soon hun.

Love cx

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I had that acid test. Not too bad except putting it in made me cough and the tecnitian was horrified at what happened as a result - hence lecture on bronch followed. Found no acid at all. Six months later oesophagus split due to long term acid burning! I find the dispersable lanzaprozole which I suck is much better than swallowing yet another capsule which has to go through my guts. And for me it works.

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It’s got to be easier than the hurrendous bronchogrammes they put us through as kids LP. I would not have one as an adult and I guess you wouldn’t either! 😫. Shocking what happened to you.

Cx

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That bronchogram at three years old has scarred me emotionally for life and given me a deep distrust of hospitals and hospital staff. No way would I ever let anyone near me with a bronchoscope.

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I had a few too as a kid and it really was barbaric. Apparently I was down for 2 tests today. The first was unpleasant. I have to go back tomorrow to have the tube taken out and give back the recording. My little cat will not have the run of the house with these wires there for the playing with!!!

Cx

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Ive never heard of dispersible lansoprazole LP and don't quite understand why that would would avoid problems with your guts (if Ive understood you right). Id have thought if you are sucking it then it would also be going through the alimentary system but maybe something about the dispersal aspect Im not getting.

I take a 15mg lansoprazole maintenance dose but may have to increase - mine's silent reflux and I also have Barretts.

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I felt a bit sick for the first couple of days when I first started taking it but then nothing and no stomach pains. I think that for me, the fact that my body does not have to break down a casule probably helps. We all react so differently don’t we so I guess that it is a matter of finding what suits us. I was on 30mg a day for a couple of years. Now I just suck 15mg last thing at night.

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We have 2 single divans so that is not going to be an issue. When we bought them I insisted we get singles knowing there could be problems stacking up for the future, thanks to this site. I did not think it would start to happen so soon though. I am rather hoping that the reflux issue will die down as my system gets used to the increased strength ICS.

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I do hope so.

Cx

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I was told 4 to 6 in but i think its a bit triel and error

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Hi, have any of you tried sipping neat peppermint cordial after a meal to help with your acid reflux? X

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Hi

Bit of a catch 22.

Quote

If you have an upset stomach, your first instinct may be to suck on a peppermint candy or brew a soothing cup of peppermint tea. However, while the minty treat can help some digestive conditions, like indigestion and gas, it may hurt others, such as heartburn due to gastroesophogeal reflux disease (GERD).

A study from 2011 published in Pain showed why peppermint might help people with irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. The compounds in peppermint actually activate an anti-pain channel in the colon. This channel, called TRPM8, may reduce the pain linked to eating some spicy foods like mustard or chili, according to researchers. Since then, multiple studies have confirmed peppermint oil to be a beneficial treatment for IBS.

When Peppermint Won't Help

When it comes to digestive pain higher up in the digestive tract, such as heartburn due to GERD, peppermint might not be such a good idea. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, peppermint can actually relax the sphincter muscle which closes off the stomach from the esophagus. This can cause stomach acid to pour back into the esophagus and make heartburn or GERD worse.

If you have heartburn or GERD, it’s probably best to steer clear of mint-flavored products to avoid the irritation that can come along with it.

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I have noticed lately that my indigestion is worse when I automatically reach for the mints. I don't have heartburn though, just severe indigestion.

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It is interesting. For quite some time I’ve been avoiding minty things because I found it makes things worse in spite of various people telling me it can’t make things worse because mint is a digestive aid. Now I’m wondering if even my minty toothpaste could be a part of the problem? I stopped using toothpaste with fluoride because I thought I must have some allergy to it but nothing’s really improved with natural toothpastes. Maybe I’ll try a non mint flavour one and see if that’s different.

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My personal experience proves that to be true.

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Thanks Stone, i didnt know that.....i just try everything natural first before having to take medication and know peppermint can help. But you can also infuse peppermint oil in hot water and inhale, also helps with nausea and digestive system this way. X

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Hi 2greys

I have a hiatus hernia and other gut problems related to my systemic sclerosis my Rheumy prescribed ppi , which I was reluctant to take because of side effects. I had so many episodes with this problem that I was glad to take them. They do work but if I get a real bad episode I also take a dose of Gaviscon advance. If I become desperate my last resort is Motilium tablets, they are only available on prescription, there is a but in some people they can cause heart problems. I am willing to take my chance, Hope that by trial and error that you are able to find some relief for your problem.

Best wishes

proffishopper

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Hi 2greys. Sorry to hear of more health problems for you. My husband has acid reflux and takes a strong ranitidine. You can buy lower dose ranitidine in the supermarkets.

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I have a wedge pillow that I bought from Amazon they do different types which are different angles mine is about 45 degrees. Takes a while to get used to but a lot cheaper than a new bed!!!

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Hi 2greys, I'm 70 and never suffered from reflux until I was put on inhalers 3 years ago for asthma/bronch. As you know, the stomach sphincter that prevents the acidic contents of the stomach from moving upward into the esophagus can be affected/relaxed by the inhaler drugs. I told my doctor that my solution was to eat something immediately after using the inhaler...thinking that that would wash the residual medication 'down the tubes'. The doctor said that I was on the right track, but that instead, I should eat something prior to using the inhaler. This would coat the esophagus and sphincter and prevent the medication from entering the tissue. This trick has helped me. Because it's easy, I use a teaspoon of Manuka or local honey prior to inhalers and rarely have reflux. Good luck!

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This is handy to know, thank you x

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Wow! Good tip, thanks.

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Causes osteporosis? Not according to the research I just did, and, like you, I am pretty good at searching for answers etc.

Anyway, I used Slippery elm to replace the PPI's I was on. Also Marshmallow root.

healthline.com/health/diges...

Doctors once believed that heartburn and acid reflux were caused by the overproduction of stomach acid. For a certain percentage of people, this is the case. But in many situations, it is not. In fact, for some people—especially as they get older—their bodies are actually producing too little stomach acid, and this can cause heartburn as well.

Q. How so?

A. At the junction of the esophagus to the stomach is the esophageal sphincter. Eating food causes the production of stomach acid, which, in turn, triggers the sphincter to close. If we don’t make enough stomach acid, however, the sphincter may not get that trigger and will stay open, and this will lead to heartburn. In addition, certain foods such as chocolate, coffee, tomato sauce, and citrus fruits can trigger heartburn by relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter.

The stomach naturally has a thin mucous lining that protects it from acid. If you don’t have a good mucous lining, your body can make even small amounts of acid and you will feel the burn. So when working with this problem in naturopathic medicine, we build up a really healthy mucous lining in the stomach. My favorite way to do this is to drink a gruel made from slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) powder. In my experience, there is nothing more soothing or better at building up the mucous lining of the stomach. To make the gruel, mix 1 teaspoon slippery elm powder with 1/4 cup cold water to make a thick paste. Then add about 1 cup hot water and stir. Let it cool a bit, and drink it down. Slippery elm doesn’t taste bad, but if you let it cool too much it will develop a very mucouslike texture. You can drink this once or twice a day. If you can’t stomach the gruel, you can take slippery elm capsules.

Like slippery elm, marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) is an herbal demulcent, meaning it’s an oily, sticky herb that helps soothe irritated tissue and rebuild the stomach’s mucous lining.

Hope that helps.

Kevin

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The patient leaflet definatly says that it can cause Osteoporosis especially with Corticosteroids (which is causing the reflux in the first place) my GP will not put them on repeat prescription and given me two months supply only. Then a review of the situation afterwards. As I have said, hopefully my system will adapt to the new ICS and the reflux will subside. I do hope so.

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Try slippery elm. Look at Titian8's comment below.

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Problem is PPI's reduce your stomach acid to practically zero, so you don't absorb nutrients/supplements which in turn causes the other problems.

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I have also replaced PPI's with Slippery Elm. Unfortunately, following a very nasty fracture of my wrist last winter a DEXA scan diagnosed osteoporosis and was advised, by doctor, taking a PPI for many years was the reason for low bone density.

I've since done a lot of research on this myself and it has definitely been proven. I stopped PPI immediately (aware closing the door after the horse has bolted!!) and rely on this supplement nowadays for heartburn.

Doctors prescribe all the 'prazoles ' too easily and, if I had known the consequences down the line would not have touched it with a bargepole.

Prescribed drugs for me are now a last resort and since taking D3,

K2-MK7, Magnesium and probiotics feel better and healthier than have felt in years.

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I’ve just ordered some slippery elm capsules after all the recommendations here. It’s a pot of 50 so I’ll see how I get on with them.

I used to sleep on my left side, I didn’t know it’s a thing but it just felt more comfortable. However, because of other health problems I can’t sleep on my side anymore so I sleep on my back but almost sitting upright. Whoever said about putting the wedge pillow under the mattress instead of using it as a pillow, I’ll try that as I don’t find it comfortable. Thanks 👍

I hope your raised bed will help things 2greys 🤞

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I am raising the head of the bed as a precaution against silent reflux during the night.

My real symptoms are straight after eating with the burning of my throat by acid and not being able to drink anything because I am on the point of throwing up my meal. A really horrible feeling that makes me not want to eat at all.

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I saw further down you said you’re giving slippery elm a try. Ive ordered capsules to try too. Hopefully it will work for you 🤞 What you’re experiencing sounds awful 😞

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Problem is PPI's reduce your stomach acid to practically zero, so you don't absorb nutrients/supplements which in turn causes the other problems.

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You can also mix the slippery elm powder into mashed bananas, some may prefer this.

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Hope you get sorted 2g, let us know how you get in with the risers x

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I was getting really bad GERD but have changed how and what I eat ... I'm eating smaller meals, not eating after 6pm to prevent episodes beginning at bedtime (this means I don't have to prop myself up in bed and makes for a better night's sleep), and keep off all the acidic food/drinks that I know exacerbate it. I refuse to take PPI's ... too many side effects.

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I worked as an Occcupational Therapist for many years, we had choices for raising head ends of beds, 4" or 6" blocks (different shapes available) most impotant thing, is that if you have castors on the bed, that the dip in the top of the blocks is deep enough to keep the castors in the blocks. Some patients used to use a couple of house bricks whilst they waited for our visit!! There are back rests which can be set at variable angles, a bit like part of a deckchair, to then rest your pillows on them, gives you a choice of angles. Also the triangular wedges, various angles available, go underneath the mattress. If you are fairly tall the blocks are best, as all the others take up some length of the bed and you end up with feet hanging over the edge. All the best with this, a horrible problem.

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I got a wedge pillow from Amazon and put it under the mattress which worked better for me than having it directly on the top. Good luck with finding something that works for you. xx Moy

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Hi there, I have exactly the same problem 2greys.

I raised my bed about 5 inches and sleep with 2 pillows plus a “ roll” which I made from foam and is about 2 foot long and cylindrical. The latter really helps. You are lucky if your gp understands the long term effects of Omeprazole. Mine won’t listen to my grumblings about it. Sadly I have spent days researching silent reflux and cannot find an alternative. So if you do please keep us posted as I have days and nights when all I seem to do is cough due to the acid. Like you after eating, drinking, talking, bending and that’s the worst for me. You can try Cider Vinegar that may help a little bit I have had my reflux for 2 years now and cannot find anything else that helps. Sorry that is not encouraging for you and it is a really annoying and sometimes for me embarrassing. I have been known to get off the bus if I feel a coughing bout starting. I gave up all the staples, onions, garlic, tomatoes and citrus fruits all in an attempt to help.

I really do wish you good luck with this because it is a nightmare. Best wishes.

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Hi Whitechinchilla, can you tell me what the coughing is like please? I have been getting a particular cough in the throat which is almost suffocating. It started after two hospital admissions earlier this year when I had IV prednisolone and ABs both times. It can take between 20 minutes to 3/4 hours to clear and it can stop me talking, walking and doing anything much at all. I have had GERD, silent reflux and Barretts for years though the GERD doesnt bother me too much since I started maintenance dose of lansoprazole. But Im aware the last few weeks of some regurgitation and increased burping so worried about implications for the Barretts in particular.

The cough which I only get once or less a day often cuts of my breathing with mucus sticking to the walls of my throat. Im just not sure if this is a manifestation of bronchiectasis or to do with the reflux. It's a very particular kind of cough and when the mucus finally comes up Im fine again. If you recognise any of the above Id be very pleased to hear from you. Hope you're having a good day. All best.

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Hi there O2Trees.

I have occasionally had a bout of coughing that can last for about 10 minutes tho it feels like an hour. But that’s not very often. My cough is quite loose and comes on after eating, drinking, talking for a while, bending, and often even when I am just sitting. I understand your concerns about Barrett’s and am sorry I can’t recognise anything I can help with except to say you need your gp to listen to your concerns.

(I have been so disillusioned with a few gps at my practice when I have felt that my worries were not being taken seriously that now I take my mobile in with me and put it upside down on the desk and tape the conversation.)

Please keep asking questions. Someone will listen or maybe you could post here and see what info you can find?

Sorry not to be able to help.

Very best wishes

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Thanks Whitechinchilla. My usual cough seems not to be related to GERD things like bending over - rather it's there all the time, but with the difficult choking one Im talking about above every few days. Ive learnt a lot from a U.S. specialist physician site called RefluxMD and my GPs are great actually. I haven't taken this to my main one yet and may leave it til I see consultant at the Royal Brompton as it may be related to bronchiectasis. Im loathe to take more lansoprazole if I can avoid it as it interferes with absorption of nutrients so will be trying some natural things e.g. slippery elm which Ive taken in the past, in addition to the the 15mg lansoprazole I already take. Also I agree with yourself and others who have said to stay away from peppermint.

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Thanks for your reply. Your support system is clearly superior to mine so all the best with finding a solution.

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Sorry, reading through your replies, I should have said, yes, stay away from anything peppermint or menthol. Plus the suggestion of slippery elm is a good one.

Best wishes.

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I’m trying to copy some links across to you, for stuff which I want to print and discuss with my gp. I may have to send them each separately. Sorry that’s a tad annoying but every time I leave this site I lose my message.

This is the first on deprescribing PPIs

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

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This is on causes and treatment of LPR

refluxgate.com/ultimate-gui...

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5 ways to test your stomach acid levels

drjockers.com/5-ways-test-s...

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NICE guidelines

nice.org.uk/guidance/cg184/...

That’s me done. Hope something here helps

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Thank you, I think that the sooner that I get off the things the better, so a little experimenting with some of the alternative remedies is in order as well. Those that suffer with reflux have my sympathy it is very unpleasant, I might even have to stop going out for a meal as it totally spoils the evening as the symptoms appear straight after eating.

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Hi.... as I run a Barrett's oesophagus help group in Essex, I have lots of info on reflux. But in answer to your question, Raising your bed height to around 4 - 6 inches is sufficient. Also, try taking Gaviscon Advance, after meals and before bedtime. This used to be available on prescription, but because of cost cuts, it's now purchase only. There is an alternative medicine available which is Peptac, which again has the Aginate raft effect, but it does not contain as much aginate as Gavison Advance. Also, try not to eat any later than 3 hours before retiring to bed. If you are suffering reflux almost after eating, this is postprandial reflux and to a degree can be lessened by Gavison Advance or peptac, also by walking around.

Try to sleep on your left-hand side if possible, your anatomy will help lessen the reflux.

To a degree, you can lessen the effects of osteoporosis by including calcium and weight-bearing exercise. However, the risks of your chronic reflux becoming injurious to your health, probably outweigh the risks of the ppi. Also taking the vitamins, O2Trees recommended will help. If you want me to send you over the ppi chapter and verse I will happily do so.

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Thank you, I already take those vitamins and sleep on my left side. My symptoms appear straight after a meal, but not sure whether I can actually swallow anything once it starts, even sipping plain water is difficult to get down. I will try to walk off the worst of the symptoms first and then take the Gaviscon when I know it will go down and stay down.

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Hi I hope this meta anyalsis of PPI's help you and those reading.

PPIs are powerful acid suppressant drugs originally designed to help cure gastric ulcers. It was initially considered a few weeks treatment would be all that was required. However their use in combatting acid reflux has led them to become one of the most popular drugs worldwide used by millions in the 30 years since their introduction and many people are on them for life.

Problems started being reported when these powerful drugs were made available over the counter in the USA and quickly led to FDA warnings.

Many people suffering the misery of indigestion use antacids. When a new drug that purports to last longer and be more effective was found next to their usual, but not so effective, Tums, many of those sufferers turned to them instead. Most people do not read the inserts in packs of tablets so it's likely many of those customers misused them. They are not on-demand medication like Tums. It's probable too many people dosed themselves too frequently or with too much. There is research evidence to show that reported problems with these drugs are highest amongst self-medicators.

If found to be necessary for more than a few weeks, the use of these drugs should be monitored by a doctor to ensure patients have the smallest effective dose for the shortest necessary time and taken correctly - ie pre-emptively at the same time each day which is probably best half an hour before breakfast.

They may be too good at doing their job of reducing acid production; too much for too long can induce a condition known as hypochlorhydria when the body has insufficient stomach acid.

Stomach acid is required to help leech essential minerals and vitamins from food, turning them into chlorides which may be absorbed into the bloodstream in the duodenum.

Hypochlorhydria can result in malabsorption of calcium - exacerbating osteoporosis, iron - exacerbating anaemia, magnesium etc.

Hypochlordydria can also result in reduction of the body's natural defences against harmful bacteria like C-difficile.

If you use PPIs at a high dose for many years, you may find you need supplementation of essential minerals and to boost your immune system with probiotics. But speak to your doctor about your concerns.

PPIs have been linked to Myocardial Infarction. That those with heart conditions may be greater amongst those taking PPIs is not surprising since the symptoms of heart attack and indigestion can be so similar. The "evidence" shows a correlation not a causation.

A more recent study followed 54,422 GERD patients in Taiwan compared with 269,572 randomly selected age-, gender-, comorbidity-matched subjects, finding, amongst other things, "patients who were prescribed PPIs for more than one year had slightly decreased the risk of developing Acute Myocardial Infarction".

sites.google.com/site/barre...

Similarly PPIs have been associated with Chronic Kidney Disease. Again this showed a correlation: those with kidney problems are more likely to be users of PPIs.

Another study looking at the medicines used by patients over the age of 75 with dementia, found a higher proportion of them used PPIs than amongst the general population. [Association of Proton Pump Inhibitors With Risk of Dementia.] Another case of correlation rather than causation and some doctors were led to speak out about misinterpreting the data. [Doctors: be wary of new PPI studies linking drug to health problems.]

A paper published in Gastroenterology in 2017 reported researchers "evaluated 10,486 volunteers within the NIH-supported Alzheimer’s Disease Centers who were aged 50 years and older and had either normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment at baseline" finding "No link between PPIs, dementia, Alzheimer's risk".

Another paper published in 2013 appeared to show PPIs could cause oesophageal cancer.

This quickly received rebuffs such as this letter: proton pump inhibitor usage still seems to reduce the risk of high-grade dysplasia and/or oesophageal adenocarcinoma in Barrett's oesophagus.

sites.google.com/site/barre... popular media loves scare stories like these and, never letting the facts get in the way of a good story, can exaggerate them causing real fear amongst some PPI users who often try turning to unproven "natural" remedies for their condition that may do more harm than good.

There has been research however that shows PPIs most probably have a chemo-protective effect helping reduce incidences of oesophageal cancer as published in this meta-analysis.

This paper, "PPIs display antitumor effects in Barrett's adenocarcinoma" also found "evidence supporting the potential use of PPIs as novel antineoplastic drugs for EAC".

In July 2017, this paper, "Risk of death among users of Proton Pump Inhibitors: a longitudinal observational cohort study of United States veterans" was widely misinterpreted by news media saying PPIs were responsile for increased deaths. The study was flawed inasmuch as it didn't say what medical conditions the patients had requiring PPIs, nor what they died of. The bottom line of that study was: "Exercising pharmacovigilance and limiting PPI use to instances and durations where it is medically indicated may be warranted."

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2Greys,

Hi have you tried Peptac it's like an indigestion mixture such as Gaviscon. I've used this for a long while especially if I sit low down. I've got a hospital bed from the local palliative care team. It is fully adjustable, maybe you need one of these, then you can have your head in a "just right" position.

IKeith

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I have ordered a set of elephant feet/risers and they should arrive tomorrow. I have Gaviscon, so the experiment starts then.

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Oh dear ! , my doctor never told me that long term use of Omeprazole causes Ostioporosis, ( which I now have , so taking" Alendronic acid " pills to sort that out !!! i've been taking it for years - blast ! ...the old story - we can't win - we take one pill to " cure" something , and it starts up something else !!...Oh well , they something is going to get you in the end ! ....good luck !! ....just thought ! , - why not try going to sleep standing up !!!......

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Oh dear right enough. This has been the exact same for me and I therefore joined Bone Health. I really recommend you reading about Alendronic Acid, so many people have written warnings about it and appears another one to avoid. There are alternatives and the suggestions are many and really helpful. Joining NOS has also been so informative.

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I haven't read all the comments but endorse inclined bed therapy (Andrew k Fletcher) and we are now at six inches. An inclined bed is very different from pillows or electrically raising one end. Bought the plastic bed raisers from Amazon. Don't eat two hours before bed. Don't drink for an hour before bed. Chew your food. Eat easily digested food - have a look at dr Ray peat's work for this one. Wholemeal food and pasta sits in the stomach way too long as would a salad (cellulose doesn't break down). Cook potatoes for 45 mins as it breaks down the starch. There's lots you can do food wise, but as I say take a look at dr Ray peat's work. Reject it by all means, but it may help.

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I am going to give slippery elm a chance, Sharon is going to town today for the final check-up on her hand, she will pick some up for me. I am determined to eliminate the use of PPIs if I can, to many troubling facts and warnings surrounding it's use, especially when used alongside corticosteroids. I have enough health issues to contend with without adding to them.

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I sure hope the Slippery Elm works for you but just to say when I stopped PPI's after years of use it was quite hard for a few weeks, as was so used to taking them every day and really had to persevere, was adamant no more prazoles!. At first I doubled the dose of S.E. for any effect, but with constant use it now works at prescribed amount, with heartburn nowadays decreased substantially, in fact can go days without experiencing any at all: so don't give up if it doesn't seem to initially have any benefit, as was the case with me to start with.

However, was interested to read kflatt's gruel recipe so am going to try that, rather than the capsules which usually contain lots of additives and fillers etc (although the one I take is Bio-Health that only had vegetable hydroxypropl methycellulose) plus hopefully it would be more fast acting from his description and increasing the mucous lining in stomach seems logical.

Hope it works for you and you feel a positive effect very soon.

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After my grand entrance I just wanted to ask if you’re taking the slippery elm daily as a preventative/ maintenance course, or as and when needed. Thanks ☺️

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I have been taking it "as and when", I now know the signs. Usually with that full feeling and knowing that if I burp it will bring up acid as well, an unmistakable feeling.

I have managed to avoid taking PPIs so far. Given that they should be taken in the morning, how can you know what you are going to be like in the evening. Thus you could be taking them without needing them that day, so end up taking them daily anyway.

I have asked the pharmacist if there was any conflict with my prescribed meds and the answer was there is not enough info concerning Slippery Elm and if I felt alright taking them, to not worry.

Yes they do work for me, and at only 10 pence per capsule they are worth it for me.

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