British Lung Foundation

experiential advice required for all of those living with respiratory disease.....please read below

I wonder if anyone in the community can help me/us. My husband has pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure. we are in an unfortunate position as our house, being old, does not lend itself to adaptation. However, we are also fortunate in that own some land around our house and as a result we are trying to get planning permission to erect a purpose built house for my husbands needs. The BLF have been really helpful and have given us all of their wisdom to make the house fit for purpose but we now need to try and find a form of innovation. So this is my plea to you all on the community.....can anyone think of anything that would really help them that isn't currently available either in the fabric of the house or as part of the interior design? anything...... no matter how silly you may feel it is could end up being really useful. When we do get planning permission we will be making the plans available to anyone that would like them so hopefully this will end up helping an awful lot of people in the future. Many thanks for your help with this. Wendy

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I would say make all of your showers wet rooms, big enough to get a wheelchair into if and when needed. It avoids the awful ‘disability adapted’ look and being flat means you don’t have to step into a tray. Both of mine have non slip tiles, underfloor heating. A heated tiled seat/bench to sit on to shower if I am not well and three shower sprays which come out of the wall directly on to my body for when I don’t want to stand under the main outlet. One of the radiators in each bathroom works via central heating or electricity so that I can be warm on a cold summer day. I’m looking forward to seeing other people’s ideas.

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Hello wuniacke .

Having everything flat and really helps. For me, my bath is deep. It is hard to haul myself out sometimes. I have hand rails and luckily I have strong arms. But it takes it out of me, pulling myself up. I think the bathroom is quite possibly quite perilous for many infirm people. I would have precautions especially there. Like an emergency button. I have almost slipped a few times.

I'm sorry I can't be more helpful. I hope the planning permission comes through very soon. Sending my very best wishes to you and your husband.

Cas xx 🌿

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A proper driveway right up to the front door and wide enough for an ambulance if ever needed.

All the doors to be wide enough to let wheelchair or scooter/buggy through.

Low level windows to see the outside world without needing to stand up.

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Either a rising bath lift or a walk-in bath are handy in these circumstances.

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Thank you mrsmummy . Eventually, I may need to consider getting a lift of some sort. 😑

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Just seen your reply Caspiana and I worry about you struggling out of the bath. Please get a bath lift. Mine lowers me right down into the water and brings me right up when I`m ready. We all like a shower for speed but sometimes it`s nice to have a leisurely soak ! Take care, Sheila x

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Thank you so much Sheila. I get a bit worried too. Today is one of those days that I can't make it to the shower room so I am doing without. But if I was in the bath now, I would be struggling. xx 😞

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Hi

Starting from scratch you may consider designing and building a wheelchair friendly home, for future proofing the property.

A long read but Part M of the building regulations gives lots of dimensions which you can choose to incorporate.

Such as wider doorways, lower cill windows, carefully positioned light switches and plug sockets, at least one level threshold entrance. Walk in showers or wet room.

gov.uk/government/uploads/s...

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Watch the turning angles between doors. It is impossible to turn from my front door into my sitting room in a wheelchair because, although there is a hall, the front door and the sitting room door are very close and at right angles to each other.

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Make sure doors and windows can be opened from a sitting position and that light switches and sockets are also accessible whilst seated.

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The disabled living foundation are a charitable organisation and have a host of useful fact sheets.i am providing a link for you..................regards skis and scruffy x

dlf.org.uk/

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many thanks i will explore now.

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I live alone in a rented bungalow and have carers in and often dream about designing my own purpose built property these are just a few of my thoughts - sorry if some repeat what other says - but a good exercise for me to do my own list to keep just in case one day ..... remote control curtains in every room, remote controlled heating possibly under floor, large open plan rooms, wooden joists at floor level to all outside flat space so that with an electric wheelchair it can just drive over them without hurting them so no need for small ramps which are needed with plastic joints as they cannot take the weight without risk of cracking, property flat all on one level (unless you can afford a lift), remote control on all oxygen concentrators to turn on and off and alter if necessary setting (why we don't have that now I don't know surely not impossible), maybe even a central oxygen supply that is just hooked into in each room, low or even completely to floor level windows or doors so easy access to the outside as much as possible and/or good views outside even when sitting - hate my windows here cannot see a thing when sitting but some sky (which is at least something - but not enough) seems so silly to have windows you can only see out of when standing even healthy people spend most of their time surely sitting in their homes, coffee machines or even drink dispensing machines in living areas plus water dispensers so hot and cold drinks on tap. Electric bed that can easily be moved to different rooms as and when necessary so very wide doorways or open thresholds - remote control panel walls so rooms can be reconfigured easily into smaller/larger spaces, lots of electric power points, ok that is it for the moment will let you know if I think of any more - should be enough to go on with - would be interested in yours and others thoughts .......

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many thanks for your very comprehensive list.....part M of the building regs and the Lifetime homes guidance cover some of these aspects but the concentrator issues would benefit from a lot of review.

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had forgotten remote control opening windows skylights and doors as other have said xx

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whoops and remote control lighting with dimmer switches and bathroom sunken small spa type swimming pool with one side gently tile steps with hand rails so can walk down into, side shelves to sit on with grip rails and showers attachments built into the top side with trough the other side so someone can sit behind outside the pool and use the shower attachment to wash hair or help aid me bathe - a touch of Cleopatra here? .. ha, ha..

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