Lack of appetite and dizzy in the mor... - British Heart Fou...

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Lack of appetite and dizzy in the morning.

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Good morning all.

I had a heart attack 5 weeks ago and have had a stent placed to open up a 50% blocked artery. The problem I'm having now is that my appetite is terrible and when I wake up in the morning I'm feeling very weak and dizzy. Does anyone else out there have the same symptoms as it's driving me crazy.

Cheers,

Pauk

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Hidden in reply to Hidden

Thanks for the quick reply,

I've just had my medication adjusted after an ambulance trip to the hospital on Sunday. My blood pressure was indeed quite low and after leaving the hospital it was too high (very confusing). Prior to my heart attack my blood pressure was always very good and I was feeling much better than I do now. Looks like I will just have to suck it up. I'm just glad that this forum is here so that I can chat with someone.

Cheers,

Paul

Hi Paul,

All of your symptoms could well be related to your meds, along with a healthy dose of stress (absolutely to be expected after your experience!).

If you're monitoring blood pressure at home one thing that no-one seems to mention (even Dr Google) is just how much it can vary during a normal day.

My typical morning and bed-time feadings are around 103/62 but it usually drops to 90/60 or so after decent exercise and can pop up to 125/70 or so at others.

About 6 months after my HA and stent my cardiologist (in the same appointment he decided he didn't need to see me again) agreed to stop my beta blockers, which helped a lot, and a few months after that my GP agreed to drop my candesartan to the lowest available dose, which also helped with the odd dizzy spell.

It's very much trial and error getting doses right because they affect everyone differently but, at least for the first few months, a few side effects are worth tolerating if you can to give everything a chance to mend.

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Hidden in reply to Thatwasunexpected

Hello Thatwasunexpected.

Thanks for the positive reply.

I've not got a blood pressure cuff but have been thinking about getting one. The only problem that I have with having one is that I don't want to be grabbing it at a moments notice as I'm also fixated on my heart rate at the moment. Something to think about.

Yeah, I'm sure it's just the medication and you're right, I have to give it a bit more time. I have no patience though and just want to jump back on my bike or go out for a run.

I've been reading some of your posts and I love your positivity, hopefully I'll be the same real soon.

Take care and good luck with your running,

Cheers from the Netherlands,

Paul

Thatwasunexpected
Thatwasunexpected in reply to Hidden

Back on your bike is a great goal, and you'll get there, but do try to keep the impatience in check!

It's not so much that doing too much too quickly might cause problems (although that is a risk), but more that if there ARE problems with the stent they're most likely to show up in the first 4 to 6 months.

If something unexpected does happen you're much better having it happen during a pleasant stroll than doing a 25k time trial just like you'd rather not get a puncture but, if you do, better at 5mph than 50!

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Hidden in reply to Thatwasunexpected

Wise words mate,

Funnily enough, I was on my bike last Saturday and managed a 20km ride. Sunday rolls around and I'm on my way to the hospital after almost passing out (at the mention of 20km bike rides my girl is shaking her head). Blood pressure was fine as was my heart rate so its either a virus or I've come down with something else.

I won't be doing that again in a hurry. Thankfully I had no chest pain, just feel like I've got a bad flu/weekness for the whole week.

Baby steps for me now and I'll be keeping an eye on your running progress.

Cheers,

Paul

Thatwasunexpected
Thatwasunexpected in reply to Hidden

It took me around 18 months to start running - mainly because I've never really enjoyed it but the gyms were closed :D

What finally swung it was realising that my normal 5-10k walks at 9min/km were rarely getting my heart rate over 100 - 110 bpm any more so had to find a way to up the intensity.

Will keep it up now (all signed up for Park run so no excuses) but really looking forward to being able to get back on the rower for a little less impact when gyms open!

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Hidden in reply to Thatwasunexpected

I love running and hiking and can't wait to get back at it. Last 2 years I've walked the West Highland Way and would love to do it again.

Good luck with the Park Run and with your attitude I'm sure you will manage a great time and have fun doing it.

Cheers,

Paul

Hello Paul what medications are you on besides the statins?

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Hello Scotsirish,

I'm on:

Acetylsalicylzuur cardio 80 mg

Pantoprazol 40mg

Clopidogrel 70mg.

Thanks,

Paul

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