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Husband newly diagnosed with. Eosinophilic asthma

Tinytune
Tinytune
20 Replies

Hi, i have just joined this community. My husband came out of hospital yesterday after an 8 day stay, starting with an ambulance to resus then hdu then the respiratory ward. He has been diagnosed with eosinophilic asthma, his eosinophil count was 2.7. He is on a steroid inhaler twice a day and we are to return to clinic in a few weeks. He has developed cough syncope and passes out a few times a day (it's improved as it was a few times an hour) he had to surrender his driving licence for 6 months, he has no sense of smell and is constantly producing extremely sticky mucus. He is very fit and active normally, thinks nothing of going on a 10k run. Will he return to normal life, he has been ill since Christmas and off work since then, no one listened in the few hospital trips we had last month and it took a 999 call and paramedic arriving to him having a silent chest for him to get help. I am so scared as he had been so poorly I just want to know if this can be managed and him not ending up with frequent admissions. Sorry for the long post, this is all very new to us.

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MELNEL

Hi Tinytune, a warm welcome to this community 🌹 I am sorry to hear that your husband been in hospital. Of course you are worried everyone would be too.

And ask the doctors or get in touch with his GP what you can do to help him to recover and what they want to do. You are not alone, you take care and I wish that your husband has a quick recovery. 🌹🌹🌹

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Tinytune
Tinytune
in reply to MELNEL

Hi, thank you. We went to see the GP and he can't do anything as yet as we are waiting for appointments with ENT and the Asthma nurse. He was very interested in the diagnosis as he has seen him very poorly for the past 6 weeks and had done referrals to ENT and respiratory but an emergency hospital trip queue jumped the referrals.

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Shellc

It’s nice to suddenly get this, can u think of a trigger that may have started this off ? I too have asthma , my count can either be as low as 3 or has high as 9.3 and more , has your husband been given medication fir this

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Tinytune
Tinytune
in reply to Shellc

On 27th December he had a cold which is likely to be the trigger, also we moved the rabbits indoors over Christmas due to the cold weather and are wondering if it could be the straw/hay. He was given a lot of intravenous medicines last week and has been sent home with a beclometasone, we were told this is a starter and the asthma nurse will review this. It is so scary how quick he ended up extremely poorly. We were told his eosinophil count was very high at 2.7, you must be quite poorly if it goes up as high as 9.3 :(

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Shellc
Shellc
in reply to Tinytune

The rabbits most definitely could be a trigger too, my partner did the same one year and put rabbits indoors, within a day my breathing was extremely bad. I have bronchiectasis as well as asthma and on oxygen 24/7 but I still try to exercise everyday on my treadmill even if it’s fir 10 minutes, the same goes for your husband when he feels well enough a little bit of excercise is key , have a look at taking vitamin d with k2 mk7 as this will help with immune system , I also take magnesium supplements too. I’m very careful indoors, I don’t have carpets , have dustmite covers on my bed and pillows , I damp dust rather than use polish , these can all be triggers, you may find these along the way . U might find that your husband only has a flare when he gets a cold , so I would definite look st supplements , take inhaler regularly as this is a preventative

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Tinytune
Tinytune
in reply to Shellc

Thank you very much for the reply, whilst he was in hospital I bought all new anti allergy bedding, we got rid of a damp spot on my bedroom wall, two of my children wallpapered behind my bed and changed our wardrobes and thoroughly cleaned our room, all things that we have been meaning to do for years but just didn't. We didn't want him exposed to dust so got it all done, the whole house is spotless so now easy for me to keep on top of using damp cloths. Until Christmas he was a regular runner, he even leads the local jogging group, he hopes to return to that and understands his pace might not be what it was but he is determined to exercise to avoid a future hospital admission. I will have a look at supplements,I have looked at magnesium rich foods so looks like plenty of salmon for him. Again thank you

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Shellc

Just an added note , when u buy new furniture etc it can have formaldehyde on it so will need to air plenty as this can be triggers too, he will find out as j goes along , hopefully this could just be a one off from a nasty virus xx

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Tinytune

Wow there is so much to consider now, you really don't think about how people with asthma cope on a daily basis. Take care x

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Josephone

I was in a terrible state when I developed eosinophilia asthma but thankfully I’m significantly better now following mepolizumab injections. I’m 72 and I go trekking cycling and canoeing. A few years ago I climbed Snowdon so that’s a bit of inspiration and hope for your husband. Hope that is helpful

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Tinytune
Tinytune
in reply to Josephone

That is really inspirational, thank you for that, he needs some hope. He is going back to one of our exercise classes tomorrow, we partner each other so if it gets too much we can take it easy.

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Saassii

What is he reacting to? What triggers are setting of symptoms? Is he allergic to any aero-allergens? Any visible mold in the home, peeling paint, water stains?

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Saassii

Oooh I just read that you had a damp spot. What was it from? Was it entirely remediated? How long was it there? What was it's size?

Definitely no rabbits indoors, the bacteria will trigger, so will the mold and microbes in their hay, droppings, leftover foods etc.

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Tinytune
Tinytune
in reply to Saassii

There has been nothing come back from all of his allergy tests, they can't pinpoint a trigger. The damp patch was small and we don't know how long it had been there as it was behind the bed. It is totally gone. The rabbits are fully moved outside. It's quite a mystery but we are being very careful and using anti allergy bedding, no aerosols, no plug ins etc..

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Saassii
Saassii
in reply to Tinytune

A couple of things to consider. During RAST testing IGE mediated allergies, which is what they're looking for, don't show up for molds in most people who are afflicted with CIRS (Chronic Inflammatory response syndrome). If a person has become affected by microbes, those can't be tested for at RAST either. When you see mold, it was originally the same particle size as bacteria and virus, but by the time you can see it, it's huge and extremely virulent. It gives off chemicals that are deadly to human tissue. Another problem is that mold, bacteria and virus all cohabitate together, one is not without the other. So while you could see mold near the bed, that was a major. Excellent it's all cleaned up. No judgement here for the lack of knowledge, I too was without knowledge and became mold afflicted, hence my knowledge increased. These topics are not well understood by scientists even at this stage, let alone regular people. I was blessed enough to learn from a mycologist and then also studied virulently.

So it's as others have said, it may have been triggered by virus, that could have been behind the bed, it could also have been somewhere else for that matter. In any case keep him away from it at all times now. E.g. Don't wait until the shower gets mold and then clean it, use a squeagy to wipe the walls down immediately and a dry towel after.

Once sensitized to microbes the hypersensitivity remains and very small amounts may continue to be triggers. Sounds like that is where he's at. Keep lots of fresh air through the house, don't close it up, consider a dehumidifier if needed.

Don't eat foods with regularly high mold levels like cheese. Ferments may also be best avoided. High histamine foods and beverages if avoided also have potential for relief. I'm describing a particularly nutritious diet with replacement of grains and some other low nutrient foods with extra vegetables, so don't feel it's something that would deplete his system, it's more a nutrient dense foods focus and removal of those that are inflammatory.

I wish you both every success!

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Brenviking

I have the same type of asthma as your husband. There are no triggers for me - may be the same for your husband. I have been on mepo for a year - my steroids are reduced considerably however I cannot exercise like I used to - I have had to give up running but I do other things and still work full time. Best wishes.

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Tinytune
Tinytune
in reply to Brenviking

Hi, thank you for your message. There appear to be no triggers that can be pinpointed. He is still quite unwell, it's been 8 weeks now and he needs to get another certificate for another few weeks off work. He wants to get back to normal life, the tiredness is really getting to him and he has totally lost all sense of smell and taste which again is really upsetting him. He was a 10k runner and has just had to defer his place in our local 10k for next year. He does exercise classes with me and he is trying a boxwell session tomorrow. I had no idea how asthma can affect everyday life. It's truly awful. Best wishes.

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Sunnydays1982

Hi there! I have just seen this post from a while ago. Just to say...I too have e-asthma and my level was at 13! After a few courses of oral steroids, montelukast, fostair steroid inhaler I am back exercising and feel completely back to my normal self. I too am an avid fitness fan and I was so down that I felt so poorly...I thought I would never exercise again! I hope by now your husband is back to his usual fitness level 😊

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Tinytune

Thank you for leaving this message. Sadly he isn't, he now has paralysed vocal chords and silent reflux which are so exhausting for him. He is having voice therapy and has been referred to a physio for breathing and poor upper body movement. His PF is very good but he is still very breathless. Hes taking fostair , montelukast as well as many others. Hopefully one day he will be able to run again but for now he needs to concentrate on walking without feeling exhausted.

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Sunnydays1982

Oh no, I m so sorry to hear that. I really hope he picks up soon and that he has a good consultant to get him on the right meds 😞

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Brenviking

I suffer from reflux also. Mepo has not worked for me - my treatment will change in the new year. I am also being referred for physio. It is bad enough having something like this without having to worry about work and think about what you can no longer do. Give my best to your husband.

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