Asthma UK community forum
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I have a weird thought...

So; for cases of Asthma where you don’t have bad attacks. Do you think that taking daily inhalers could actually make you more susceptible to attacks? Like when you take Ibuprofen every time you have headache (even minor ones) it eventually causes you to have more headaches?

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I wondered this too. I’ve definitely noticed my asthma has gotten worse recently. I’ve never had a bad attack (thankfully) and because of this I always wondered if I actually do have asthma, mainly because often I can breathe myself though my very mild attacks (I do still need my reliever though). I presume this is because I just got so used to what was happening that I never thought anything of it. However since I started on my inhaler I’ve noticed that if I forget to take my inhaler my chest is so much worse than it’s ever been. And the house I’m living in is damp and I’ve had 3 chest infections in 3 months. I’ve never had a chest infection in all my 26 years. So yea I’d presume that in the long run the steroids could cause problems 🤷🏻‍♀️

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Things have significantly worsened for me as I have got older. Your damp house could be a significant factor.

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I am very aware that my damp house is a factor.

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We have also lived in a very damp house, our own, but last summer big work was done to improve on that. I can’t say it ‘cured’ my asthma, but it feels loads better! And had become highly necessary.

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Unfortunately I’ve tried taking steps to fix the problem. It’s a privately rented flat, and my landlord has came in and reinsulated and built a new plasterboard wall over where the damp was on the wall. He claimed that the damp is caused by myself and my flatmate (apparently we should have our heating on ALL day every day and the windows open ALL day every day). I’ve even been to my GP to see f there was anything that could be done to invalidate my contract but she said as it’s not a council house she can’t do anything, such as write a letter to state that the house is unfit for me to live in. Like I said I’ve never had a chest infection in my life and since I moved into that flat in August I’ve had 3, 3 courses of antibiotics and steroids, and 3 emergency trips to hospital. 43 days till I can move out :)

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That is really difficult and unfortunate. We have had tiny bits of condensation, but there was no doubt that the big problem was rising damp. And we could do something as it is ours, but it cost an arm and a leg, so I can see a landlord would do anything to get out of that one! Not that he/she should. Have your considered getting you a dehumidifier? I am not suggesting it would solve the problem by any means, but perhaps it could help a little. I got one, it probably cost me someth8ng like £130, and it certainly gets water out of the air! At first I got a tiny one. I might as well not have bothered. I hope you don’t have too long to run on your contract! Talk to citizens advice maybe? If they exist round yours.

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I have an unrelated citizens advice appt tomorrow so I’m going to see if they can help. I got a salt lamp which helped for a few weeks but now doesn’t seem to be doing much good. The issue with the damp is that if he avoids fixing it it’s just gonna cause problems with future tenants 🤷🏻‍♀️ the damp is coming from the basement so all the insulation is going to end up soaking and he’ll be back at square one

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And in the meantime the black mold would grow etc, etc. It really isn’t good!

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It’s awful. It’s not my fault - it’s the flat. There’s actual damp and mound not just condensation. I’ve never been this ill in my whole entire life. My chest has been tight since last night and I’ve got cold symptoms except it’s not a cold because I’m not ill :(

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That sounds very much like asthma. Don’t hang about, seek help! It sounds as if you need it!

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Neither asthma nor a difficult, neglectful landlord is your fault!

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Thank you, it’s nice to hear I’m not to blame 😂

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No, I don’t. Now I only occasionally get significantly unwell, last time last September with a chest infection. My inhalers helps improve my asthma, I am absolutely clear about that.

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From personal experience, no; not at all. Only by taking inhalers consistently over many years have I had any sort of quality of life. The 20+ years before I had the correct treatment, I was prone to serious attacks every few months & was generally knackered if you'll pardon the French.

So, as an unscientific & 1-man experiment, I honestly think they will work correctly & long-term in the vast majority of cases (which of course is not to say there might not be exceptions out there, I've just never come across it personally).

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Nope, not at all. Since I have been on medication, I no longer cough so hard that I double over and feel like a rib will crack. I may not have in-the-hospital asthma, but it does ruin my quality of life still, yes, just not like before. I have noticed that I seem to catch colds more easily than I used to--but that could be age, could be the asthma itself weakening the immunity, or could be the meds. I am not too particular, though, as long as I am not coughing like that any more.

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That sounds nearly like me. I am also a cougher, and meds have really helped, but also with my breathing which was becoming increasingly strained.

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I don't know if I ever had strained breathing. Probably--it was just covered up by many things. I have bouts were I suddenly lose quality of life--going up stairs becomes difficult, etc--and then bouts where it's almost like nothing is wrong. I think I domino easily with triggers--and most of my triggers are out of my control.

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Hi this sounds like me to I have actually fractured a rib from coughing and pulled muscles but since starting spiriva and taking my other meds regularly my asthma cough is much better, I still get infections but I don't cough as much or as hard

Lejaya

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I am grateful I never cracked a rib, though I could have possibly pulled or strained a muscle without realizing it. Every time I feel like maybe my meds aren't doing what they are supposed to, I dredge up the memory of what it was like before. Then I'm like: nope, workign fine :D But yeah, I get colds so easily now. still, almost 40. could just be age :D

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The inhalers don't work like that - you don't get immune to their effects. It may be that if your asthma is mild, you can tail the inhalers off to see how you get on without them, but generally it is by taking them as prescribed that you maintain a decent quality of life.

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Hi there,

Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for asthma. However, we do have some very good inhalers that provide treatment to prevent the build-up of inflammation in the airways and if taken as prescribed, with perfect inhaler technique, should reduce the risk of an asthma attack.

The preventer inhaler only works if taken every-day even if you feel well. An asthma review appointment is offered annually at your GP surgery in order to check your symptom control, review your inhaler technique, discuss your current medication and make any necessary changes and to update your asthma action plan.

There's more info on inhalers here: bit.ly/2t2juqH

Hope that helps,

Dita

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No, like others I don’t think that. I do vary the amount I take depending on the season. In winter I will typically need to take 2x2 puffs daily of Flixotide 250: in summer that will go down to 2x 1 puff daily and, in a very, very good year (2012 was one) I will even manage to go down to 1puff daily for a spell, though I acknowledge that’s rare. I’ve been on flixotide 250 for over ten years and I don’t think I would be able to reduce the dose like that if what you suggest were true.

I can remember what it was like to be an asthmatic child on no medication (for five years back in the 1960s). Inhalers changed my life when I was eight and a half years old and still allow me to lead a pretty normal life over forty five years later:-).

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I remember trying to do the reduced thing for summer---it ended up being so staggered that I think this year I will just stay on the same schedule. I do so much better in the summer, but I am wondering if the triggers are just less so it seems like I am better than I actually am. Then again, round bout march, my tests and whatnot come back good, but in the winter they are bad, sooo...not sure XD (spirometer and all that)

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I suppose it depends on what your triggers are In the summer months. I still don’t know why I was so good in 2012. As UK summers go it wasn’t particularly sunny or warm, but for some reason my lungs really, really liked it. I’ve never been that good since.

I tend to rely on how my lungs feel. At the moment I’m on the threshold of dropping to two doses in the evening and one in the morning and my lungs feel well enough to cope with that.

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Asthma is so finicky. This year has been one of my best years since being on meds, but who knows what will happen for the rest of the year :)

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Hi Dustin 585, yes I wondered this too. I'd managed with clenil inhaler when the asthma flared up and ventolin for several years. I'd had on dose of oral steroids when it got worse afte a chest infection and that was it until last summer. The doctor gave me a short course of oral steroids and changed my inhaler; I'm on fostair. Since then I've had to keep taking the fostair as when I've tried taking it then the asthma comes back. However my peak flow improved quite a bit and this time of year I usually start getting a tight chest from the high tree pollens (hazel and birch) and I've hardly had any symtoms! My conclusion is that my asthma was getting worse and is now more stable again since the stronger inhaler.

From all I've read on here I'd say that asthma can get worse for no obvious reason

but being on the right treatment - with a step up and step down approach - means it is more managable and there is no evidence the daily inhalers make you more susceptible to an attack. In my case quite the opposite over this last year.

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