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Asthma UK community forum
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Peak flow readings

Hi, can anyone tell me re average peak flow readings. I know we are all different but my average seems to be 340 ish. Is this poor readings? What is normal 'good' or just plain old good. I have brittle asthma. Feel drained and exhausted most of the time.

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There is a standard charts which they use as a baseline based off your sex, age and height (some use race too) for what your peak flow should be. However everyone is different and your peak flow is as unique as you.

My peak flow varies from 300 to over 550, with an average of 470. Based off my details my peak flow should be around 440.

My mother regularly can't attain a peak flow of more than 250 to 300, but lives a normal full life with minimal input from inhalers (rarely takes ventolin and has daily preventers) but according to the charts she should be at 380.

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Thank you I will ask about them from asthma nurse. Keep well

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My peak flow is typically 450-470, have blown 500 a few times. When it drops to 400 I get breathless, tight chested, cough and when it's 380 I'll start coughing through the night, at 350 I feel terrible and very tired. I will also feel like my throat is full of hairs.

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Thank you. Lol throats sounds like mine. Keep well

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Thank you, and you. X

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I think this raises an interesting question, as do the other responses you have had. I was recently diagnosed with late onset asthma having been to the doctor to sort out my incessant winter colds, some chest tightness and mucous production - otherwise, I felt fine! It turned out that I had a peak flow of 300 when it should be 500- that's a lot of difference when you consider my symptoms were so mild (at least compared to some of those far more unfortunate people I see in this forum). It strikes me that the absolute peak flow figure is less important than the comparative figure when you take medication; it certainly doesn't seem to be an indicator of the type or severity of symptoms that you get. I think it might be best just to take the medication which has the most improved peak flow result (and which you can tolerate, a problem I have been having with mine), rather than get too hung up with the actual figure. After all, the object of the exercise is to feel better, not to achieve the winning number!

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Thank you for replying. I guess as it's so new to me I'm trying to understand it all. I am on maximum amount of meds including nebs, inhalers, tabs. So educating myself is an important process to accepting and dealing with day to day symptoms. The actual figure isn't really important at the end of the day. Remain well.

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Thanks, Olivia, I guess there are a lot of us newbys in the same boat. I wish you well, too.

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I think you're right about the relative value being important. I' m 5'9", use preventer inhalers and rarely have symptoms. Yet my best reading is 410!

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My peak flow average is 100 so there's not difference in being 'low' to normal. But as others have said your expected average score depends on height weight etc. Everyone has different scores and as long as you know your average then you can and your doctors can judge how well your asthma is controlled. I hope you stay well and controlled.

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Hi Olivia 1

340 is what I usually do on peak flow. 340 is good for me. Below 310 is bad. Check your peak flow for a month. What was your peak flow on the best day? What was it on your worst day? From this you can create an asthma action plan. For me 325 and above is green zone, good. Between 325 and 310 is yellow zone which for me means little or no exercise. When I go below 310,it's time to call the doctor.

Wishing you good breathing, John Terry McConnell, author of "Running with Asthma: An Asthmatic Runner's Memoir."

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