Coping after an admission

Hi all

I've just escaped from my first stay in HDU with my asthma.I had lots of new things happen this time - I had to have an arterial line inserted,had my first IV aminophylline infusion (along with my usual nebs, O2, magnesium and hydrocortisone), and was assessed by ITU for BIPAP/CPAP, plus a very fast and rollercoaster-like ambulance ride! Needless to say, I was in pretty bad shape and after this am kinda struggling to come to terms with it all, although I am used to ""normal"" hospital admissions.

I'm generally after some advice on how to cope after something like this happens. I will be taking a course of prednisolone and having a low threshold for giving myself a neb at home, but I am a very fidgety, lively person and am finding it tough to sit still for too long! I am still getting breathless quite easily and am cautious of overdoing it, but I have to think about getting back onto my nursing placement which I currently supposed to be doing, as well as keeping a clean, tidy house etc...

Help!

Emz x

5 Replies

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  • Hi Emz

    I just wanted to say that I know how you feel, I remember my first ICU admission when the same things happened and my first time being ventilated, it leaves you feeling shell shocked, I dont have the answers and I hate to say that in the end i got used to it, but I very clearly still remember my first ever time, I have found over the years that talking to a counsellor about it helped me put it in perspective and make sense of it all.

    Just dont put too many presures on yourself right now, take some time out and let the routine go to put for a wee bit, and look after you!

    Sorry im not much more help, but I do understand and care.

    Take care

    Snowy

  • Hi

    I'm sorry you feel like you do- It's still recent and raw, which makes it worse. As time passes you will feel better about it.

    I too can remember the first time I was admitted to HDU- and ITU and being ventilated- it was terrible and is terrible- the most traumatic experience of my life but I survived and have been able to carry on.

    I found reading about it helped- it filled the gaps which left me wondering why- I spoke to my consultant and asthma nurse at great length who were able to read and interpret my notes and explain exactly why. Try seeing your consultant or asthma nurse- they are the best people to explain it all.

    Take time to recover don't try and pretend it's not happened- make sure you feel fit and well physically and mentally before going back to work etc.

    The people on here are very supportive- chat to them.

    PM me if you need any support- I'm not an expert but have been there!

    Best Wishes

    Truly x

  • Thanks to both of you for your replies - I'm finding coping a bit harder than I expected. I have slept almost constantly since I came back home and finding it difficult to prepare meals, do the stairs etc as I'm getting very breathless,but like you said, it's bound to take time. I'm very lucky that my boyfriend now lives with me and he is brilliant, fetching and carrying and he even just helped me wash my hair as I couldn't stand long enough to do it myself. I'm amazed at how weak I feel.

    Thanks for your words of encouragement, I think thats what I need right now :(

    Emz x

  • I also remember my first ITU visit and ventilation . That memory will always reside in my long time memory alongside many other ‘firsts’ most of which are positive. It was such a wake up moment for me ( please excuse the clumsy metaphor) not because I understood what was happening ( I didn’t) but most of all because afterwards, I realized that my perception of asthma symptoms didn’t match the reality of what was actually happening. And I needed to pay attention. Hope that makes sense!You are not alone Emz, so many hugs and I hope you are taking things easy. It felt almost surreal when I got back home but I put it down to the lack of oxygen when poorly. Please try to give yourself more time than you think you need for recovery and return to work no matter how 'lively' you might feel. Your whole body has taken a metaphorical battering, and if you need more time to complete your placement remember your health comes first.Mia XXXXX

  • I also remember my first ITU visit and ventilation . That memory will always reside in my long time memory alongside many other ‘firsts’ most of which are positive. It was such a wake up moment for me ( please excuse the clumsy metaphor) not because I understood what was happening ( I didn’t) but most of all because afterwards, I realized that my perception of asthma symptoms didn’t match the reality of what was actually happening. And I needed to pay attention. Hope that makes sense!You are not alone Crazybaby, so many hugs and I hope you are taking things easy. It felt almost surreal when I got back home but I put it down to the lack of oxygen when poorly. Please try to give yourself more time than you think you need for recovery and return to work no matter how 'lively' you might feel. Your whole body has taken a metaphorical battering, and if you need more time to complete your placement remember your health comes first.Mia XXXXX

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