Anyone see this?

My mum sent me this link. I don't know if they're really saying anything that new (science reporting in average broadsheet/tabloid usually not that great) but I notice they don't mention the reported side effects of Singulair!

In the end just seems to be 'these pills work better for some asthmatics than some inhalers' - which was surely kind of obvious already!

telegraph.co.uk/health/heal...

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  • Seen it too on the Asthma UK Facebook page. Not sure the article (available nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/N... ) mentioned the full study outcomes ""Study results at 2 months suggest that LTRA was equivalent to an inhaled glucocorticoid as first-line controller therapy and to LABA as add-on therapy for diverse primary care patients. Equivalence was not proved at 2 years"". It's a fair point about treatment adherence but not sure it would save hospital admissions as surely they are less common particularly if used in mild/moderate asthma.

  • Singulair

    Hi Philomena

    That article appears on AUK website too.... asthma.org.uk/news_media/ne...

    It's reported by AUK as being good research. I tend to accept stuff that AUK endorses. Certainly for me Singulair has improved my peakflow if nothing else! I'm not aware of any side effects for me personally though I expect for many people these occur.

  • HI Mardi ,

    I'm sure the research is good - certainly reputable journal etc and as you say endorsed by AUK - I just tend to find reporting of science in the general media not so good and the article I read and linked to seemed a bit vague and not really saying that much, so interesting to see the original.

    I'm not on Singulair myself but have read that it does have some reported not-so-pleasant side effects for some people (my mum asked 'could they not try you on that just to see? so I looked it up and thought I could see why they wouldn't try it unless reasonably sure it would work well for someone) - just wondered why the article I linked to hadn't mentioned them. The study doesn't specifically, though I'm guessing as the quality of life scores increased most people didn't have any problems as I can't imagine side effects improve quality of life!

    Be interesting to see if any more comes out on this or there are any other studies.

    Edit: TJ, I also thought fair point about it being easier to take pills and making sure you've got the full dose, though the Telegraph article mentions being 'less self-conscious about taking the medication' - surely more an issue with relievers, as most people take their preventers at home most of the time.

  • Husband drew my attention to it. Reported as if its a new tablet but knew it wasnt. Sone folks do marvellously on Singulair with no side effects. Me, I had really awful side effects when I took it. Feelings of worthlessness and bad dreams. Did not do much for my asthma either. Despite this, my asthma nurse tried me on it several times, even though I said no thanks. :(

    PS Husband has tablets for blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes. Forgets to take them all the time. Be better with an inhaler, if such a thing were possible.

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