Inhalor woes

I've been asthmatic all my life and for the past 16 years, it had been controlled with Brycanyl and Pulmicort turbohalors. However, I've recently (In the past 3 to 5 years) noticed that they are ineffective in the event of an attack.

I've mentioned this to the asthma nurse at the surgery on every review I go to but she is refusing to change the medication in any way because ""I'm not ordering repeat prescriptions as often as I should"".

The reason for this is due to them not working in the event of an attack. By my reasoning, if I don't take them on a daily basis, they should be more effective in the event of an attack.

When I'm taking them as prescribed, I find that in the event of an attack, I have to go to hospital and my local minor injuries unit just send me to the big A&E ""because they aren't equipped to deal with me properly"".

Does anyone have any advice that might make someone listen to me and change my medication?

2 Replies

oldestnewest
  • Firstly you should always take your medication as you have been prescribed! It tells you in the leaflet you should not stop it without GP guidance and taking it hit and miss will mean it wont work at all!

    Secondly go and see your GP they can advise and help you and if ness go and see a second GP for a second opinion.

    Plumie

  • Firstly you should always take your medication as you have been prescribed! It tells you in the leaflet you should not stop it without GP guidance and taking it hit and miss will mean it wont work at all!

    Secondly go and see your GP they can advise and help you and if ness go and see a second GP for a second opinion.

    Plumie

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