New vitamin D deficiency : I am 6... - American Bone Hea...

American Bone Health: Osteoporosis
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New vitamin D deficiency

I am 68 years old and new here. I have osteoporosis in the neck of my right hip. I am a bit overwhelmed and fearful of osteoporosis. I have been diagnosed with Vitamin d deficiency and abnormal parathyroid. My doctor put me on 15000iu of Vitamin D3. I will do that for a month. Then he will check my blood levels. Then he wants me to go reclast for my osteoporosis.

Is there any other way to build bone density and reverse osteoporosis than using pharmaceuticals? It seems hip surgeries are fairly routine and people recover easily. Is this true for people with osteoporosis? Would it be better to eventually have hip surgery and not take the pharmaceuticals with side effects. As you can see I am in a quandary and would appreciate any of your insight. Thank you

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I have osteoporosis and have chosen not to take drugs. I have improved my bone density via supplements, bioidentical hormones and exercise. I recommend betterbones.com/. Best of luck to you.

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Which supplements did you use to get results?

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I take a Life Extension product called Bone Restore which contains D3, K2, calcium, magnesium and other minerals. I have reduced my caffeine intake. I walk daily after work for 2+ miles. I also bought a rebounder (mini-trampoline) which I use daily for 20 min. It is a great weight bearing exercise that is easy on your ankles, knees and hips. I would definitely see what you can do to improve your bone density naturally before considering the pharmaceutical path.

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I ordered the K2 Bone Restore. I do Zumba 2-3 times a week, Pilates, yoga and kayak. I am active. How long does it take to see results on bone density scan?

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I suppose it is case-by-case but my T score improved (hip-left femoral neck) from -3.0 July 2016 to -2.3 Oct 2017.

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Well that is an improvement! So what bio identical are you taking? How did you figure out what was going to reduce your osteoporosis?

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I did lots of reading and research because I didn’t like what I learned about bone drugs. I take estradiol and progesterone. Restoring these hormones I believe has been a positive factor in improving my bone density.

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Who prescribed the estradiol and progesterone? My doctor told me I was too old for that type of therapy. This is quite a maze to go through. I don’t want to take drugs. I am Adrea is of the side effects.

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Afraid not Adrea

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Perhaps hormones (prescribed by my GYN) were an option for me based on my age. I am now 58, and began hormones at age 56.

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Thank you for all your help. I understand that you are young enough to take hormone. At my age they frown on it.

This is my plan: I will take the D3, Bone Restore, multi collagen. Eat healthy alkaline diet. Continue weight-bearing exercise daily. I will see my doctor after six weeks. I will get a bone density test before make further decisions. Then I can figure out my next step. Thank you for all your help. Can you recommend a good book about bone health?

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My primary references have been the Better Bones website by Susan Brown PhD and Life Extension Magazine published protocol on Osteoporosis. I think you have a solid plan in place! I’d be interested to learn about the multi collagen product you mention

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I had my density scan in May 2017. My doctor is using the data from that scan. I had -2.7 right neck femur. I am thinking that I need a retake of my density scan. I have been exercising 5 days a week for the past year.

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Femoral hip

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The exercise is key and it sounds like you have been vigilant. :) Some doctors will order a bone density every year. Others will order every 2 years. I hope you see some positive results.

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How old are you?

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Thank you. Do you have osteoporosis?

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Oh, I see that you do.

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A diagnosis of oteoporosis can be scary. Take a deep breath, and then begin evaluating the information.

There has been a lot of hype and misinformation about the dangers of the osteoporosis medications, but the discussion is seldom balanced against the dangers of not taking the medications.

Here are a few things to consider:

•Although hip fractures had been declining for decades, because of a decline in testing and fear of the medications, the number of hip fractures is on the rise. (https://americanbonehealth.org/osteoporosis/new-hip-fracture-rates-end-years-long-decline/)

•Hip fractures can be life-altering or deadly. Of those with a hip fracture: 20-24%will die within the 1st year; 33% will be dependent or in a nursing home a year later; 40% will be unable to walk independently; 60% will still require assistance a year later. 50% of those with one osteoporotic fracture will have another. (World Osteoporosis Day - americanbonehealth.org/fast... )

•You mentioned just having hip surgery after a fall as a possible option, as hip surgeries are fairly routine. Although hip replacement surgery has become fairly routine for healthy people with osteoarthritis (rather than osteoporosis), they are still major surgery and carry their own set of risks. Also you have to be healthy enough to be a candidate for major surgery. I read an article recently (https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/7/30/17614460/osteoporosis-falls-hip-fractures-bone-density-bisphosphonates) that led with the story of an elderly man who fell, broke his hip, but was not healthy enough for the surgery. He remained bed-ridden and died a year later.

•The deaths and disabilities from hip fractures are widely discussed, but I was talking recently with a colleague whose mother was an example of disability and death from vertebral fractures. In addition to back pain and fatigue, compression fractures (and the associated rounding) can limit mobility and the activities of daily living, can restrict the abdominal space (limiting nutritional intake) as well as limiting heart and lung function. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693826/)

•The osteoporosis medications have side effects, but all medications have side effects. Read the warning labels on anything in your medicine cabinet, including your toothpaste. And like all medications, there have been serious, adverse effects in a small number of cases. Those adverse effects are known and documented. The incidents are very few, especially compared with the average 50% fracture risk for a woman over age 50. (https://americanbonehealth.org/medications-bone-health/dr-karpfs-response-to-bone-drugs-article/)

You ability to reverse osteoporosis will depend on several factors. 1) How severe is your osteoporosis; what are your T-scores; have you already had a fracture? 2) Are you willing/able to commit to the diet, exercise, and lifestyle changes required?

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Thank you for your candid advice.

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Please go to parathyroid.com and read about the disease. It could be causing your osteoporosis.

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If parathyroid issues are causing your osteoporosis, I'm not sure diet and exercise will reverse it. I would check that with your doctor. I do not have PTH issues but truly believed I could reverse osteo with diet and exercise. I've been health conscious/organic for 40 years, was a dancer and exercised diligently before being diagnosed at 57. My doc wanted me on meds but being "all natural", I fought it and figured I would just up my game, increasing my weight training, taking additional exercise classes specifically for osteo and tracking my nutrient intake, particularly my calcium and supportive nutrients. I really believed I could do it and was all in at 120%. After working on this for 2 years I was devastated to find that I went from -2.8 to -3.2. I was shocked. I couldn't possibly do more than I was doing and realized that my osteoporosis was genetic and no matter how much I worked at it, I wasn't going to gain any bone being postmenopausal. I then decided to go on Forteo (not an option for you due to your PTH). I didn't do as well as I had hoped but I went from -3.2 to -2.9. Now I need to decide what to go on next. I am exploring bioidentical hormones as an option as I think it is the most natural of all options, though not exactly natural at my age (62). I feel like it's the least of the evils. It's a difficult decision and it's all so frightening but ultimately, we need to do what will protect our bones from fracturing. My conventional docs are resistant to prescribing hormones but I will be going to an integrative doc instead. I hope you figure out what is best for you and have good success.

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Hello Hummingbird and welcome! I'm sure we can all relate to the shock and fear that you're experiencing having just been diagnosed with osteoporosis. To put in context, a t-score of -2.7 is only just into the osteoporosis range (starts at -2.5), so I don't think it's unreasonable to take your time to consider your options. Everybody's risk factors are different (the risk of fracturing rises with age, and with other health issues that can contribute to it, including genetics). Some people fracture with t-scores in the osteopenia range, while I've read of others with t-scores of -4 or less, in one case -6, who have never fractured! I'm 62, tried bisphosphonates for a year but didn't get on with them so for the last 3 years have been trying a more "natural" route. My t-scores are -3.6 spine and -2.5 hip, but (so far) I haven't fractured. As you've been diagnosed with parathyroid problems it would make sense to get this sorted first and see what impact that has on your bone density, as it's quite possible that this has contributed to your osteoporosis. Ultimately, however, none of us know our actual risk of fracture until it happens, by which time it's too late! We all cope with different levels of perceived risk and you'll need to make your own decision about whether or not to take osteoporosis medication, but a few weeks or months while you make that decision won't make any difference to your fracture risk unless you're losing bone very rapidly (not likely, given your t-score).

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I just posted that I have Hyperparathyroidism right now, myself. I am having a scan done and will learn whether one of the four glands must be removed. I am certainly going to be taking more Vitamin D3 also. I believe the D3 can block a lot of the excess parathyroid hormone. I do hope that works for you. I am taking Bone Up by Jarrow, which is very good. My cousin got out of osteopenia using bone up. My osteoporosis hip scores are so bad that I was started on Prolia, but the doctor I am seeing tomorrow has suggested Forteo. I will have to discuss the new game plan with him about my newly determined Hyperparathyroidism.

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I am exactly your age, also have a very high Parathyroid Hormone range (my doctor actually wrote Hyperparathyroidism), and had a Sestamibi Scan (showed no adenomas). I, too, am to go back for blood work in August. My hip scores are -3.6 and -3.7...yikes!! I added extra Vitamin D daily on my own, as I wasn't told to do so.

I have had two Prolia injections and am due another in July. When I had the second injection, I had bad flu-like symptoms for about 3 days. I'm told it's like a chemo reaction. I'm very worried about the next injection, but am willing to go on and take the shots for at least 2 years, as my doctor (a Rheumatoid Arthritis MD) feels I should. Then I would have to automatically begin another type of bone treatment, or risk fractures. I have a long fusion in my spine due to scoliosis surgery, which is another factor to throw in with my case.

I am going to go on and begin to see an Endocrinologist who also sees one of my sons. So, this is my story so far. I hope I can keep up with your case, as we have similarities. Good luck!!

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Hummingbird79, I see that you wrote this 10 months ago and wondered if you were still on this site and might feel like sharing what you did about your situation. I seem to be in the same place, myself. I actually have had two Prolia injections, but like you have Hyperparathyroidism. I was wanting to take Forteo but was advised that it wasn't a good idea as I have the Hyperparathyroidism.

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