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AF Association
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The Word "Ectopics" Does NOT Exist & "Ectopic" Is Poorly Used Here

Using said word is not telling anyone anything; way too general of a description! Kindly tell us what exactly is happening, so we don't have to ASSUME anything! - Thanks!

ectopic[ ek-top-ik

adjective Pathology.

occurring in an abnormal position or place; displaced.

??? See what I mean???

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I put in the words: ectopic heartbeat definition and pages of definitions came up. Here's one - An ectopic heartbeat is when the heart either skips a beat or adds an extra beat. They are also called premature heartbeats. Ectopic heartbeats are usually not a cause for concern, and they may occur for no known reason. Despite the skipped or added beat, the heart otherwise functions normally. Sep 28, 2018 (Medical News Today)

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So you are correct, in that the word Ectopic simply means occurring in an abnormal place. An ectopic pregnancy occurs somewhere out of the uterus. But in discussions of heart rhythm, an ectopic beat or ectopic rhythm is an irregular heart rhythm due to a premature heartbeat. Ectopic rhythm is also known as premature atrial contraction, premature ventricular contraction, and extrasystole. When your heart experiences an early beat, a brief pause usually follows. While ectopic beats are common in everyone. Those of us with Afib typically notice ours more.

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True, but using the the single word w/o saying ectopic "what" is not sufficient, and "ectopics" is not a word, as there is no plural for "ectopic".

Simply say A-Fib or AF!

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I think most of us on here know what ectopics mean and it's used all the time, I myself have awful "ectopics"! 😊

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Must be a U.K. thing. In 3 1/2 years since I 1st had AF, and 8 or so episodes & 2 ablations, I have NEVER heard said word used here in the USA. Here is the only place I heard it.

Using the single word by itself is kind of like saying "i drive a red", when you mean "I drive a red car". One cannot assume you mean car, as it could be a truck or motorbike, etc.!

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I agree. Have never heard the word ectopic anywhere else but here and have been in this game for 10-1/2 years. Not entirely sure how to interpret it yet as it seems there may be more than one use.

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But ectopic is a recognised word, I don't understand the problem because on a heart related forum everyone ( well almost everyone) understands the meaning, on an unrelated forum it may cause confusion.

I've just seen a medical article titled Ectopics in Exercise so the word is used.

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You could just say "anomaly", but you still need to be specific about what exactly is anominal.

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Sorry but anomaly would mean nothing to anyone, we all understand what ectopics mean.

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I do not suffer from' ectoptics' but recognise that some people here do not have as good a command of English as others.

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What would you say to be 'correct'? I think we all know that 'ectopics' refer to 'ectopic heartbeats' of which there are several versions, but all unpleasant. The technical term in hospital is 'eppies' - well, that is what the technician running my treadmill test called them!

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There is now. English is a constantly developing language. Ablation does not only refer to a pulmonary vein isolation procedure. To ablate means to cause not to exist. Ergo if you had a cardiac ablation then your heart would no longer exists and you would be dead. We do know what people mean , however, and in the context ot atrial fibrillation it is an accepted term. When I had my first PVI, ablation was very new and one nurse at my medical centre when I mentioned I had an ablation thought I was talking about having varicose veins removed.

Ectopic beats are not AFib or AF and never become such so need a different term and "ectopics" or "ectopic beats" has worked perfectly well here for many years.

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My EP knows what an ectopic is, and understands what I mean when discussing with him

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When I worked at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station launching billion dollar satellites on Atlas & Titan rockets, we had ablative materials coating the walls down in the thrust deflection pits just below the rocket engines. I don't think anyone here would confuse "ablation" with such materials.

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An ectopic beat is not the same as Afib (AF), so there is the reason for the differentiation. An ectopic beat is a totally benign condition, an early beat that usually resolves itself.

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No, I'm afraid I don't see what you mean Aufgeblassen.

People come to this forum for support, not to be told they're using words incorrectly.

Jean

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As an American you must excuse his English and some of his spelling :-)

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I'm not criticizing anyone. But many newcomers here may be confused & not correctly understand what some are saying.

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They can always google it, if I don't know or understand a word or abbreviation that's what I do.

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Or just ask 😊

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Indeed 😊

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They only have to ask!

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When they taught you English - did they tell you it originated in the UK?

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My EP said to me after my ablation that I wasn’t to worry if I experienced ectopics over the next few days, I must remember to tell him ectopics isn’t a word 😂

As far as I’m aware ectopic (heart beats just to clarify 😉) are not AFib. From what I have gathered you have suffered from AFib that has been treated effectively with two ablations, it would seem that you haven’t much understanding/ experience of other arrhythmias and the terminology used and seem to think that they all fall under the umbrella of AFib, This is not the case.

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It Seems like you are in Sinus rythem or you are not.

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That’s definitely true but the variants outside of NSR are very important and they are not all AFib.

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But for ablation to be considered "successful", you should have "NSR".

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I wasn’t aware we were talking about ablation???

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OK, I'll rephrase: for ANY treatment to be successful, one should should be free of ANY type of rhythmic anomalies, 24/7/365.

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That’s the holy grail , yes, but as with the many variants outside of NSR there are many interpretations of success. For example if you have AFib and you have an ablation that deals with the arrhythmia but you are left with ectopic heart beats your EP (in the uk and I think universally) would still declare your ablation a success.

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So non-A-Fib heartbeat anomalies don't require meds including blood thinners? If so, I'd agree. But if ANY med is still required, it was a FAILURE. The whole point of an ablation is to not only return NSR, but also allowing STOPPAGE of all meds.

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We went through all this when you challenged me regarding the SVT. I have tried to explain it as simply as I can but I don’t seem to be doing a very good job. SVT can be treated with medication, I was medicated for 12 years with flecainide.

No, the whole point of an ablation is to improve quality of life, whatever that might mean for the individual patient. I have no idea why you are diverting this post to talk about ablation??? I thought you were making a point regarding ectopics??

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You need to be more specific. Ectopic is too general of a term. Ectopic heart valve, Ectopic aorta? etc.

Ectopic simply mean "anominal"

So if you go to doctor and say you are concerned you may have anominals, he will want more information.

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So now we are back to ectopics 😂

Every time I’ve written ectopics I have followed it with heart beats to clarify it for you. Believe me if I go to my EP and say I have ectopics I won’t have to clarify anything, you might have to but I wouldn’t. At least now you could clarify it for your doctor easily, I’m sure after this thread you are in no doubt what is meant by ectopic.

Just to clarify:

An ectopic heartbeat is when the heart either skips a beat or adds an extra beat. They are also called premature heartbeats. Ectopic heartbeats are usually not a cause for concern, and they may occur for no known reason. Despite the skipped or added beat, the heart otherwise functions normally.

This is the first thing that comes up on google if you put in ectopic beats.

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Regular irregular (sounds like an oxymoron) heart beats of any kind is not good, unless you are taking a blood thinner to avoid blood clots. Chronic rapid heart rate is no good either, as it wears out your heart, and you end up with a shorter life.

I've NEVER had one w/o the other. They went hand in hand the 8 episodes of A-Fib I've had over the last 4 1/2 years.

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That is a theory.

Unfortunately, most people (most medics even) do not understand what Atrial Fibrillation is, nor Normal Sinus Rhythm (is there a good definition here somewhere, or should we start a post about it?)

I think they thought that my second ablation was successful - but they "killed" my atria, so I had no "p" waves, my atria did not beat (at all let alone in sync) and so I consider that I was not in NSR.

Fortunately (after I had been disabled for about five years) when they replaced my pacemaker, they fitted an additional atrial lead - so I am no longer disabled.

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What about sinus arrhythmia 😁?

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heart valves.

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I had ablation of my heart valves TWICE to stop A-Fib & A-flutter. Both times were immediately & highly successful! (but 1st time was unfortunately was temporary; 17 months)

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No you didn't. Your pulmonary veins were ablated. To be totally accurate the rogue spots at the entrances to your pulmonary veins were ablated, also the areas causing flutter.

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NOT TRUE! They ablate the hear valve areas. right at the heart valve!

Here is a pic that shows the ablating catheter right at the heart valves!

mayoclinic.org/-/media/kcms...

Full article here from the Mayo clinic:

mayoclinic.org/tests-proced...

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All I can say is it is a good thing your EP knew what he was doing 🙄

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Indeed! If they ablate too much, then your heart rate is too low, and then you need a pacemaker to bring it back up.

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I am under the care of a world renowned electrophysiologist, if ectopics as a term is good enough for him and describes what people like him mean by an ectopic then it's absolutely good enough for me.

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Aw Aufgeblassen - some people talk about ‘hoovering’ the carpet - with a Dyson!

Who cares, as long as we understand what idea is being expressed?

Having ectopic beats or ectopics - to be or not to be pedantic.

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My vary point! Many Americans DON'T understand what the attempted expression is. For quite a while here, I was under the impression that it meant SYMPTOMS of AF and rapid HR such as lightheadedness. Only today did I get enough annoyed by the use of the word to try to get a better definition!

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You recently got equally annoyed enough to challenge me regarding my Use of the acronym SVT in regards to my condition, insisting it was AFib when it isn’t. Perhaps if you struggle to understand the terminology used on this UK site if might be helpful if you take time to ask people to clarify. Everyone is so helpful here I just don’t understand the annoyance. When I first started using this forum I didn’t understand any of the acronyms and I hardly even understood the complexities of my own condition but i Found the list explaining the all the acronyms and I asked lots of questions until I got to grips with it all.

If you don’t understand what the attempted expression is just ask. Everyone will be more than happy to enlighten you, that’s the whole point of the forum, to inform and help each other. 😊

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Hi Aufgeblassen

There are lots of American AF websites that may suit you better, by using language you understand, rather than you get annoyed with a British based one. I'll see if I can find the link for you to one that was recommended recently.

Please don't be offended by me telling you this, but we Brits see whole words typed in capital letters as shouting and I'm sure you don't want us to think you are doing that.

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I always thought you were German......

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I sympathise Aufgeblassen - English speakers are often separated by a common language!

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I know! Think it is funny that the Brits pronounce aluminum alumin(i)um! An extra "I".

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That’s how we spell it here - with the ‘i’ - aluminium.

I remember reading somewhere that American spelling is closer to old English than the version we use which was made to look more ‘French’ when French was the language and manner of the Royal Court. Words like thru were changed to their present form, through in English. I don’t think it looks particularly French!!

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When I lived in Canada for a few years, had to get used to it being "flavour" and "colour" instead of "flavor" & "color". Also it was ZED instead of ZEE. Also (at least on the west coast) it was "washroom" instead of "bathroom" or "restroom".

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We don’t just pronounce it we spell it that way!

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I learned something NEW today!

[img]https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStMEg79uhIUfqSrCHejQjnCiJStOoRYPfQwVj0YqDkqL_K4-dPYQ[/img]

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I also learned Aufgeblassen is translated as “inflated”!

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Actually, the real word has only one "S". Actually the real word also means FART.

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Right

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😂

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I would really like not to have etopics, so really I don’t care how it is written, I’m not a native English speaker, but I understand perfectly what it means. I remember one of the members here who explained it like this:

1, 2......3 ☺️

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Yes, exactly what I had with my A-Fib. While being prepped for a chemical stress test the very 1st time I had an episode, in the room they had a speaker hooked the to monitoring machine, and it was quite disheartening to hear my heart momentarily stop, then pick up the beats momentarily later. :(

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It really sucks, that’s the least you can say about it with or without s.

🥴

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The point is that ectopic heart rhythm, irregular heartbeat, and A-Fib all literally mean the same thing.

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That could be, but since we all understand each other and support one another we like to use them all, and... all etopics don’t feel the same, you have all sizes, small, medium, large, etc...🤪. But if I could go without, I would in a heartbeat.

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The very 1st time I had AF, I had no symptoms whatsoever, and during a routine 1st thing in the morning blood pressure check, my machine said my HR was DOUBLE normal; 150 instead of usual 75! So I borrowed a tranquilizer from the wife. I then took checked it again 2 hours later, and it was 160! So I decided that although I felt fine, I should have it checked out. So we went to the ER, and diagnosed with A-flutter and rapid heart rate. They injected a med, but it didn't help at all, so they admitted me into hospital. They (days later) did a cardioversion, and all was well for 15 months, at which time it came back again & again, each time happening more frequently. So I got my 1st heart valve ablation.

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Here E.R is A&E :-)

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I think I'll try not to worry about it!

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Worry about what? Not sure I not what specifically what you mean.

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The original premise of this post is by far the most pointless and pedantic I’ve seen on here.

Language is a tool not an art exhibit.

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There was no attempt to mock people here. Just trying to clear up confusion, not for just myself, but others too. Still waiting to hear what radagast58 is not worried about.

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I've heard of ectopic pregnancies for years -- meaning the pregnancy is out of place (not in the uterus). Lighten up. You're giving we Americans a bad rap on here.

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You've confirmed my point - too general of a term. It simply means ABNORMAL. So when they talk about going out in the yard and experienced abnormals, it is far from clear what happened. I'm done talking about it.

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