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Pericarditis

? Pericarditis

Hello everyone! Just thought I would see if anyone has had a similar experience. I had an Ablation for Atrial Flutter on Valentine’s Day! All went well until I my chest started aching. My GP thought it was Angina and gave me a GTN spray. Two days later I thought I was having a heart attack, we called 999, they came really quickly and were brilliant. Off to A and E. All checks done, probably Angina. Said I should go to the drop in chest pain clinic where the Nurse Practitioner said no it wasn’t Angina, speak to the Arrythmia nurse! Now feeling very confused! The Arrythmia nurse was lovely and said she thought it could be Pericarditis, so rest rest and more rest and I am to ring her on Friday. Has anyone else had anything like this?

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I haven’t had this but I believe pericarditis can be very rare complication of ablation. It’s very annoying when you don’t come away with a definitive diagnosis isn’t it? I would continue to do as the Arrythmia nurse advised and rest and don’t hesitate to call 111 or 999 if you become concerned.

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Thank you so much for replying. Yes, it helps so much to have a diagnosis. Yes, I will rest, which is fine as I have a lot of sewing to catch up on, cat allowing! Ollie thinks it’s a chance for extra laptime!

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I recall that Kaz on here has had this recently after ablation for AFib and flutter. She had medications for it and rest ,I believe. It seems odd that the response is to just rest and wait until Friday!

I'd not hesitate to call 111 again if no improvements.

Best wishes

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Thank you for replying Wilsond. It was also suggested that I take Iboprufen, but I can’t as I take Warfarin. So I am quite happy to rest, with phone at hand, just in case! I can ring the nurse earlier than Friday if necessary.

Best wishes Liz

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A pericardial effusion showed up on my post ablation echo but it was small so they still sent me home. Luckily it didn't seem to cause problems.

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Thank you so much Buffafly. It is good to know of other people in the same boat. This is such a helpful forum. And it is so good to have a diagnosis after all the uncertainty. I will rest as much as pos (cat very pleased as it means more laptime!) and I expect it will settle. Thanks again Liz

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Yes I developed pericarditis and gastritis a few weeks after my ablation. Initially he advised 1 Ibuprofen every 2 days for a few days as they are anti inflammatory but as they are contra indicated I couldn’t have many. When that didn’t help I was put on a 3 day course of Colchicine and Prednisolone. I had to take things easy for a while. My EP said I had one of the worst reactions he’d seen. It was like an autoimmune response with my body fighting very hard to heal itself. That’s why I’m heading back for another ablation soon as he believes some of the pathways have reconnected and I need a touch up. He said if there’s any signs of inflammation like last time he’ll get me on these drugs sooner this time. I wrote a post about 4 months ago called “Gender Differences”.

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Thank you Kaz. That is so helpful. I don’t think mine is as bad as yours, poor you. Mine is a continuous dull ache now, but presumably it started with a bang, when I thought I was having a heart attack. I can’t take anti inflammatories either as I am on Warfarin, so it’s just rest and more rest. I am very pleased to have a diagnosis, it does help to know where you are!

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Take it easy and I hope you feel better soon. If not, don’t hesitate to see your doctor.

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If the pain isn’t settling, your GP may well be able to confirm the diagnosis of pericarditis with her stethoscope. This will often reveal a “pericardial friction rub”, a rather scratchy sort of noise.

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Thank you so much. That is really interesting and I will follow it up. Luckily I have a son who is a GP, but he lives rather,a long way away. We have telephone consultations, but I don’t think involving a stethoscope will work!! So it will need to be my local GP!

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Yes that’s how the doctor confirmed mine.

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This for those interested in the history of medical instruments.

“The stethoscope was invented in France in 1816 by René Laennec at the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris.[1][2][3] It consisted of a wooden tube and was monaural. Laennec invented the stethoscope because he was uncomfortable placing his ear on women's chests to hear heart sounds.[4][5]:186 He observed that a rolled piece of paper, placed between the patient's chest and his ear, could amplify heart sounds without requiring physical contact.” [from Wikipedia]

Before the stethoscope, it was standard to put a handkerchief or similar on the patients chest and apply the ear to the chest. When the binaural or 2 ear stethoscope with a diaphragm came along it became much easier to pick up and differentiate the various sounds or lack of them from the lungs, the heart, the abdomen and the blood vessels.

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That is really interesting. My husband has had countless lipomas removed. He was interested in their removal over time, and he found that in the South Pacific (a stone age society in the last 100 years or so), shark teeth were used to cut across the lipoma, sea shells pressed down either side to expose it, and then a bone fishing hook was used to lift the lipoma as clear as possible before detaching it completely with another shark tooth.

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