Something for BobD...: Bob, knowing that you... - AF Association

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Something for BobD...

Hidden
Hidden
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Bob, knowing that you love the cars and racing, here something that is not easy to meet in the streets these days. Bought it in 1982., restored it during 1983., drove it only 600 miles and it is resting in the garage since than. Do not find the time to take care of it in these past years (decades), though I have retired 2 years ago. It is BMW Isetta, 1955., 350 kg, 12 HP, 250 ccm, max. 80 km/h, 5 l/100 km. If I take it in the street, there is always a bunch of kids behind me, running and shouting!

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IanMK

A Bubble Car!

A good many of us will remember these 😁

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to IanMK

Yeah, in the 1950ties, there were quite a lot of them in the streets. It was the first "car" people could afford after the WWII. I looked at them as a kid and always had a dream of having one for myself. It took me a year to restore it, but it was a pleasure, indeed...

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IanMK
IanMK
in reply to Hidden

Dreams DO come true πŸ˜‰

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BobD
BobDVolunteer

Park it against a wall and you can't get out! My dad used to sell motorbikes and micro cars so I went in quite a few as a youngster. The big engined 4 wheel Meschershmit was the fastest but those are really silly money these days. I had a friend who rolled an Isetta outside John Coombes place on the Guildford Bypass in about 1963 coming back from a bank course in Hindehead. I was about two minutes behind in my Triumph Gloria and the accident went on for quiet a distance as it rolled like a football.. He was OK but his passenger broke his arm when it went through the sunroof as they were rolling.

The worst of the breed was the Peel but the Scooter Car wasn't far behind.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to BobD

The reason I do not drive it is because of feeling a bit insecure in it. It is not so much the thin walls and the vicinity of the door to the legs, but the fact that it behaves strangely on the uneven ground and does not obey the controls in the way one is used in modern cars. The gear shifter is not synchronized, so it makes trouble when shifting down, the car lacks the power and accelerates slowly etc. It is to be driven only on the meetings of old-timers and it will very likely be so in the far future.

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pottypete1
pottypete1
in reply to BobD

Believe it or not I witnessed a similar incident Bob.

I was on the top deck of a bus when we collided with a bubble car. It too rolled down the road like a football.

I don’t remember if the driver was injured. Certainly before the days of seatbelts. I am pretty sure the he/she must have been OK as that part I don’t remember.

Pete

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FlapJack
FlapJack
in reply to BobD

I was following a Reliant Robin once along country lane and as it went round a bend, as if in slow motion, it rolled over onto its side and slid gently along the road. When it stopped, the driver clambered out of the rear doors, walked round the side and slowly lifted it back on its wheels. Before climbing back into the driving seat, he turned to me and said β€œit’s always doing that” and then drove off.....and no, it wasn’t Del Boy!!

There was also a Heinkel !!

Bet you wish you still had the Gloria......

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BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to FlapJack

I know where it is! It is in Surrey near where I sold it to and under restoration. I also know where the first aircraft I flew is . Just need to find Viv from Jarrow and I have a full set.

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FlapJack
FlapJack
in reply to BobD

πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

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Dadog
Dadog
in reply to BobD

Interesting Bob! I borrowed an Isetta back in the mid sixties from a work colleague when I was working at Artington, near Guildford. I was doing a commute between there and Haslemere. The climb over Hindhead put that wee motor to the test - but at least I never rolled it! That was a fast but clear stretch of by-pass past Coombes, so I'd wonder what he was doing to roll his motor!

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Dadog

Hi! As to my knowledge, Isettas in England were equipped with only three wheels (one at the rear). Of course, such an vehicle lacks stability. Isettas in the rest of Europa were equipped with 4 wheels, but at the rear the wheels were narrowed to a track of 800 mm, to be able to avoid differential and make the power train simpler. My Isetta is sufficiently stabile in the lateral direction, but oscillates very much in longitudinal direction when driven on rough terrain (small span between the axles).

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Dadog
Dadog
in reply to Hidden

You're right. Problem was (or is) that the wheel base is so short. Three wheels can be very safe as on the Morgans, which can be driven tail out with much enthusiasm and enjoyable fun! The Isetta, for me, has a solid sort of charm about it and could prove so useful with today's parking problems ( as long as Bob's comment is heeded) and you park into a curb and not alongside!

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BobD
BobDVolunteer
in reply to Dadog

Usual Isetta problem Rear wheel steered. The chain used to pull it round so you either spun like a top or rolled. Some had four wheels which were slightly better.

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cycleman73

LOL so welcome to the AF Car Enthusiasts Section...he he !?

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MazzyB

Wow really brilliant not certain I’d fit in it! But great

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