Log in
AF Association
14,960 members17,921 posts

Apple Watch vs Kardia in diagnosing heart rhythm disorders

techradar.com/news/can-smar...

In this respect do members feel the Apple Watch is the best of the smart watches and more sensitive and accurate in picking up AF?

I have a Kardia and find it good for distinguishing ectopics from AF, but I don't use it much now. I suppose I'm looking for an excuse to buy another gadget, but I can see it would be useful for measuring rate, fast and slow, particularly if episodes are brief as long as it is accurate in AF. Also jolly useful with syncope.

Do you trust your Apple Watch?

20 Replies
oldestnewest

Seeing as you already have a Kardia, (which is obviously better for heart monitoring) you don’t need the Apple Watch but if you fancy another gadget, buy it. As for justification? 🤔

I’m a bit of a gadget lover myself.

Pat

Reply

I have both, an Apple Watch, and a Kardia. The Apple Watch is good in that I have a complete readout of what my heart is doing all day, bit scary sometimes, so I do turn it off! I use the Kardia to check on a particular rhythm if worried. I am a gadget lover, so would prefer not to be without either! I do find that I have to recharge my watch an extra time every day if I do use the app!

5 likes
Reply

Oooh, I don’t have to charge mine and the Kardia app is open on my watch. I charge it overnight. They just did an update so it’s not at you all the time now, improvement.

Reply

I love gadgets too so I looked it up, seems the watch works by sensing blood flow in your wrist, whereas Kardia is registering electrical signals, so the results may be different.

2 likes
Reply

Hi oyster, Gadgets don't diagnose conditions, or figure out the proper treatment; doctors do. Don't waste money on another gadget, spend it on a good medical evaluation.

3 likes
Reply

Kardia is BMA recommended in the UK, Irina1975; I know it hadn’t been in the US but that may change. It’s invaluable and accurate.

4 likes
Reply

Thank you, Didn't know that.

Reply

Hi NickiC,

Thank you for posting this!! I live in the US and I have always wished for something like this! I never heard of it before. I have a Reveal Link implanted in my chest and it is set to send a transimission to my EP if my rate goes over 170 ( I go to aboiut 210-225 while in Afib) Like I need a monitor to tell me that!! However, it does not detect when I am only in Afib without tachardia which is what I NEED!! I just had mt second ablation and because I cannot wear a holter (alergic to leads), a gadget like the one you mention here seems like a grea idea. So, quick question for anyone that knows. Does the Kardia detect afib and can it tell you the diffence between PVC, PAC, and A fib??? Thank you for your time :)

Venessa

Reply

Hi there Vanessa, it deals only with AFib and gives three outcomes, normal, unclassified (not often) and possible AFib; the latter obviously has to be “possible” because it’s a machine but it is accurate and it records the readings so you can send them to your own doctor or, for a small fee, to a Kardia doctor for confirmation. It’s smaller than a credit card and in the UK costs about £80.

Regards, Nicki

2 likes
Reply

With a very small amount of self-education you can recognise PVCs and PACs yourself from the trace, also even with a lot of PACs etc mixed in it still usually says 'normal'. I know it can be tricky to distinguish between lots of PACs and AF by feel.

1 like
Reply

Hello,

Thank you for your reply. If this machine produces "strips" than look like ekg strips, I am good to go because not only have I been studying them for four years, my daughter is a Nurse and will be able to help me with it. Yes, I have a hard time telling the difference between PAC,PVC and A fib at times. I am trying to tell my doctor that metoprolol causes me more etopic beats, but he will not "listen".

Thanks again,

Best,

venessa

Reply

Venessa

medhelp.org/posts/Heart-Rhy...

On ectopics, this is a conversation that might interest you. My experience from being in persistent AFlutter is that the PACs bother me more than the AFL and that the PACs are only a problem when my heart rate is slow, which is where the beta blockers came in

1 like
Reply

Hi,

Yes, my heart rate is between 48-55 and that is when I feel most the PAC beats. I will check out the conversation-Thank you kindly!

Reply

I was first prescribed metoprolol after being diagnosed with atrial flutter. From being asymptomatic, I became hugely symptomatic with big palpitations among other severe side effects I never had palpitations before this deadly drug for me). later I learned that metoprolol is contraindicated with vegal AF-- it can make the arrhythmia worse. I submit that your GP is not up to speed on beta blockers. I suggest that you find literature online to substantiate how the metoprolol is the probable cause of your increased etopic beats. There are more rate control drugs that could be more suitable for you.

1 like
Reply

Hi,

Thank you for your reply. Yes, Metoprolol is a horrible drug for me. I would never allow my PCP to RX my heart meds. However, even though it is the EP that is prescribing my meds, he knows how sick they make me and would prefer to try RX flecainide or Cartia or Verapramil--- I have to be on tmetoprolol because I have small burst of SVT over 225 and he says I need them. I cannot take rhythm control or calcium channel blockers due to horrid side effects. ( worse than metoprolol) I have not tried flecainide because I am afraid.. I had my second ablation on January 2nd and and praying I can get off this drug! It is ruining me . I know it is a rhythm control, but as stated, I am terrified to try it because of the horrible side effects I had with other drugs. Thank you for helping me :)

Reply
Reply

(App playing up) the Kardia gives a rhythm strip, I think it corresponds to V6, my cardiologist used my recordings to diagnose pauses and referred me to an EP for ablation on that evidence plus previous hospital recordings of AF and Aflutter.

1 like
Reply

That sounds perfect! Thanks again for your help!

Reply

I & hubbie recently got the new Apple Watch for Christmas so I am very interested in knowing more because I am finding it quite confusing. I don’t know how accurate but having looked carefully at the technology - I am pretty sure it is, as you say, very sensitive.

It has the Kardia app on it - if you have it on your phone. You can take a Kardia reading - if you spend the extra £100+ required to put a Kardia band on your watch - but then you don’t have to carry another device around - so you can leave it where you can’t find it when you want it! For that reason alone, I am going to buy one next month - but then I had the earliest version of the Kardia which fitted the phone I had 2 phones ago and now doesn’t.

I feel my heart speeding up and going out of rythm but I know many people don’t so the watch with the Kardia app enabled - will give you an alert buzz and message if your resting HR remains 120+ for more than 10 mins - so that alone could be a good enough reason.

I bought the watch because my third Fitbit in 2 years fell apart and I needed a new, fairly good looking watch - I just reckoned it was good value and did all the things I wanted.

The clincher for me was that I can call emergency services by just pressing a button on the watch and it will then message 2 people that emergency services have been called. After my TIA episode of a few months ago when I was on my own both my neighbour and hubbie insisted on me having some sort of an alert attached to my person. I am still vain enough that I want it to look good!

Justification enough for me.

5 likes
Reply

I have a heart rate monitor on my IPhone and a cheap fitness watch - quite useful but frankly In my experience it doesn’t come close to taking my own pulse with two fingers on my wrist. If I suddenly feel odd a quick pulse check tells me almost immediately if it’s just a flutter or that I have gone into AF. I try not to dwell on it and get on with life as normal- otherwise the worry/stress over it is self perpetuating. After 2 ablations I am not aware of any return of the long bouts of AF I used to have - but as one would expect at 70 other health issues come along which require attention!

One thing is for sure - we’re all different and what’s good for one may not be the same for another - getting referred to a good specialist EP was certainly the best thing I ever did - notwithstanding several ups and downs.

1 like
Reply

You may also like...