NHANES PCa: aspirin study: NHANES... - Advanced Prostate...

Advanced Prostate Cancer

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NHANES PCa: aspirin study

smurtaw profile image
72 Replies

NHANES: Aspirin Use and Lethal Prostate Cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study - ScienceDirect

sciencedirect.com/science/a...

NHANES: Aspirin use and prostate tumor angiogenesis - PubMed

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/346...

72 Replies

Is the mechanism strictly better blood flow and thereby reducing the spread of pca? Would daily cialis or viagra have a similar effect? Something to ponder or not?

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to

Certainly, something to think about. I think that aspirin use might go deeper since it is a Cox-2 inhibitor.

I use Cialis or Viagra an hour or so before arm workouts that focus on metabolic stress.

My PCP put me on low dose aspirin back in 1994. I told my MO that I was taking low dose aspirin and she thought it was a good idea and that I should continue. Most of the evidence is for some cardiac risk reduction. When I use testosterone during my BAT therapies, it is a good idea to increase cardio, and use aspirin and statins and plant sterols/stanols. Testosterone is helping me keep my PCa away, but it also increases cardiac risks. Fortunately, it's simple to monitor.

Manilo profile image
Manilo in reply to smurtaw

Please would you elaborate on how you're doing with BAT.

What stage of prostate cancer are you in, and what sequence and doses of BAT you are taking, enzalutamide or abi, ADT ?

Thank you

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Manilo

Sure, the details are in my book and it's too much info to format for a post.

In brief, my TMB has dropped, my bone density has increased, my PSA during the last ADT phase was 0.02, my CEA has gone from 3.1 to 0.7.

I am T3c, Gleason 9.

I use testosterone propionate instead of cypionate so I can drop to a true castrate level during ADT. I use abi during ADT but not during SPT. I use low dose estrogen during ADT and also Lupron. I use bicalutamide at times and sometimes switch to Xtandi.

A few days ago, I went from a high testosterone phase to the ADT phase. The next two months should tell me if this is continuing to be successful (14 months so far).

Manilo profile image
Manilo in reply to smurtaw

I will follow you and read the details. I want to learn how to do BAT properly.

you must read this scientist here, on BAT and how to restore Enza

twitter.com/laurasenamd/sta...

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Manilo

Thanks. I like the graphs. Some of them are new.

Here are a few links:

1. Bipolar androgen therapy (BAT): A patient’s guide - Denmeade - - The Prostate - Wiley Online Library

onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...

2. How BAT Works and possible BAT/Xtandi repeats: How Bipolar Androgen Therapy Works | Prostate Cancer Foundation

pcf.org/c/how-bipolar-andro...

3. Overview of studies as of 2022: PCa Commentary | Volume 161 | Bipolar Androgen Therapy (BAT)

grandroundsinurology.com/pc...

This RCT might prove to be very exciting: 6. STEP-UP RCT. BAT, Enzalutamide, BAT, Enzalutamide, repeat... Sequential Testosterone and Enzalutamide Prevents Unfavorable Progression - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show...

Depending on how it goes, PCa for many of us might be akin to diabetes. I jumped the gun and am already doing it. 14 months in and nothing short of fantastic results. I forgot to mention, I had a Pylarify PSMA-PET scan and no cancer was found. My MO is pleased with the unexpected results.

A few more:

8. RE-sensitizing With Supraphysiologic Testosterone to Overcome REsistance (The RESTORE Study) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show...

9. RESTORE commentary: A Multicohort Open-label Phase II Trial of Bipolar Androgen Therapy in Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer (RESTORE): A Comparison of Post-abiraterone Versus Post-enzalutamide Cohorts - PubMed

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/326...

10. TRANSFORMER: Testosterone Revival Abolishes Negative Symptoms, Fosters Objective Response and Modulates Enzalutamide Resistance - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show...

11. TRANSFORMER commentary: TRANSFORMER: A Randomized Phase II Study Comparing Bipolar Androgen Therapy Versus Enzalutamide in Asymptomatic Men With Castration-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer - PMC

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

My libido is 5-15 times a week, bone gain is amazing to me and my PCP didn't believe me when I told him, body recomposition is out of this world (21.6 lean lbs in 14 months and 2.60% fat loss). Lots of resistance training went into that but I've been doing resistance training for over 40 years and have never made gains like that since I was 18-20.

QoL, energy, PCa control, and just plain fun. I'm thankful that I tried it (I'm hormone sensitive) and I'm glad that my MO didn't try to talk me out of it. That said, I'm only one person and a question is will this particular BAT version work for others?

I know of a number of guys who are using SARMs now and they all have good things to say (they do have one major drawback - they reduce HDL levels). One of the guys is a bodybuilder and he raves about them. SARMs with ADT dropped his PSA from 900+ to less than 2. He's getting ready for his first high T cycle.

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel in reply to smurtaw

The Sequential Testosterone and Enzalutamide trial looks very interesting but like so many other good trials, you have to be CR. I don't want to be CR for many years so why can't they open these up to CS cases like me?

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Benkaymel

Denmeade said that he is attacking the CRPC men because it is going to be easier to get BAT into SOC.

Makes sense because we have lots of therapies for HSPC but not as many good options for CRPC.

The BATMAN study was done on HSPC. Bipolar Androgen Therapy for Men with Androgen Ablation Naïve Prostate Cancer: Results from the Phase II BATMAN Study – PubMed pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/273...

I'm HSPC. CR is not going to happen as some kind of digital function. Many of us are convinced that doing BAT will reduce the possibilities of allowing the morph from HSPC to CRPC. The logic is sound. The mechanisms are logical. BATMAN gives us some data to view (unfortunately they used testosterone cypionate). And a recent RCT led researchers to this conclusion among others: "SPT decreases ARs that have been upregulated during ADT therapy. This was verified with an RCT."

My thoughts:

"Initially, nearly all prostate tumors are gas guzzlers: very fuel-dependent and powered by the androgen receptor as the engine. When treated with hormonal treatments gas prices increase and most tumors remain fuel-dependent but become more fuel efficient, able to go farther with less gasoline. But then as we make gas plentiful and cheap (high androgens or testosterone) the tumors become less fuel efficient since gas is cheap.

In each cycle of PROP-BAT, we go from cheap gas to expensive gas. The prostate tumors never settle down into gas guzzlers or gas-efficient vehicles (castrate resistance).

In order for this to work we need to be able to make gas very expensive. This is one of the advantages of PROP-BAT. By using testosterone propionate, we can go to very low levels of testosterone during the ADT phase and this makes the gas prices very expensive."

I hear you though. I wish some BAT RCTs were being conducted on HSPC men. I think that the reality is that they are doing what they can and don't have the funds to attack everything at once. When BAT becomes SOC this should change.

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel in reply to smurtaw

You seem to be so knowledgeable about treatment. Are you doing your BAT totally under your own direction or in concert with your doctor(s)?

Darryl profile image
DarrylPartner

please be advised. Absolutely no one should self medicate with aspirin vis a vie prostate cancer without advice from your doctor. Talk to your doctor first.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Darryl

Are you referring to bleeding risk?

No_stone_unturned profile image
No_stone_unturned

The timing of this post is coincidental for me. I just met with my new MO and one of the first suggestions was baby aspirin. Sounds like there’s something to it. Thank you as always for the resources to back that up.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to No_stone_unturned

No problem. I asked my MO about a list of supplements and therapies. No surprise that she thinks that exercise is the most important thing that patients can do. But I was surprised at her extremely high ranking of baby aspirin. Previously she had encouraged me to continue the aspirin that my PCP suggested back in 1994.

No_stone_unturned profile image
No_stone_unturned

I’ve been using Dan Shen instead of aspirin up until now, but this report on the combination is interesting…

“ConclusionIn conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis including fourteen randomized controlled trials, and comparing Chinese medicinal formula FDD combination with aspirin to aspirin alone support the efficacy of a combination of FDD and aspirin, finding that combined therapy was significantly better than aspirin as monotherapy in treating patients with coronary heart diseases. However, the trials conducted to date have been of relatively low quality. More full-scale randomized clinical trials with reliable designs are recommended to further evaluate the clinical benefit and long-term effectiveness of FDD combined with aspirin for the treatment of coronary heart disease.”

karger.com/Article/Fulltext...

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to No_stone_unturned

No stone, we use Dan Shen as well. Just wasn’t sure with the Dan Shen, Berberine, curcumin I should add the baby asprin.

TCMG profile image
TCMG in reply to Miomarito

How do you find Dan Shen without aspirin so far? Is it effective? How long have you been taking it?

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to TCMG

TC, he has been taking it since January. It is in powder form, one scoop in a smoothie 1/2 tsp., another scoop in the morning. I don't know how it is without aspirin, as we do so much. I can tell you, they did not have high hopes for my husband in January but he is still here, works all day, mind you, not sitting down but fence installing, and out talking to customers. We have started laughing again and enjoying time with each other. We just went to Konebles for his birthday last week and enjoyed vinegar and french fries, spending the day with our children and grand children. He has had no chemo or radiation, on Lupron and just started half dose of xtandi. We have opted for the quality of life route, I prey it was the right decision!

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to Miomarito

I have to say, I am surprised his blood work all falls within the normal range, and wasn't like that in the beginning.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Miomarito

Great to hear! PCa can be a source of health. Sounds counterintuitive. But my diagnosis made me examine my health closely and make changes. My CVD risk has decreased enough to negate the mortality risk of my cancer. Add to that increased bone density, increased lean mass, decreased fat mass, .... Yeah, I'm very happy with how things have gone.

About aspirin, TA pointed out a good RCT (ASPREE). If you are over 70 it might apply to you. I'd talk to my doctors and get their opinion. If your CVD risk is high and ESR and blood viscosity are worse than average they might decide that the risks of not starting aspirin are greater than the risk of starting it.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to smurtaw

it’s still not good, Smarty… just trying so hard to keep him from suffering and in pain. I am lost when I read what you do.. I wish I understood more… you are doing good, I wish you the best.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Miomarito

Ouch. Read my book. There are some very low-risk things in it. SARMs and PROP-BAT are higher risk so I would think hard before doing them. One thing that I think is low risk is NPP. Surprisingly. But I have been very surprised at the results. Makes sense biologically but I only believed it when I saw it in action.

TCMG profile image
TCMG in reply to No_stone_unturned

How do you find Dan Shen without aspirin so far? Is it effective? How long have you been taking it?

No_stone_unturned profile image
No_stone_unturned in reply to TCMG

To be honest, my guess is it’s like most supplements… Is it working, is it not working? I can only judge things on how I feel cumulatively which is good. Is it the exercise, is it the diet? My conclusion is it’s all of it so I stay the course. I introduced supplements into my regimen around January of 2022. My thought process is even if it’s a waste of money, it’s given me some sense of taking control back.

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel

Thanks Russ, interesting but somewhat frustrating for me that I've been on daily low dose aspirin, Atorvastatin and plant sterols in Benecol drink and yogurts for several years but it didn't prevent me getting APCa! ☹️

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Benkaymel

You're welcome.

I hear you. I have taken baby aspirin for 28 years and have exercised and participated in competitive sports for 40+. I didn't drink to excess, never smoked, my diet was always pretty good. I still got PCa. But maybe if I didn't do any of these things, I would have been diagnosed with T4 PCa instead of T3?

The best evidence we have is for cardiac risk reduction via sterols/stanols/statin compounds/low dose aspirin. Since many of us die from cardiac issues risk reduction is important. If some of these therapies have value for us in our struggle with PCa, so much the better. Win/win or win/neutral?

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel in reply to smurtaw

Agreed. I originally took them due to cardiac health concerns and that is even more important now that I am on PCa treatment.

Tall_Allen profile image
Tall_Allen

Aspirin studies have had equivocal findings because of the way they've been done. Some say, yes (some with high dose, some with low dose); some say no - and there is a real risk of alimentary tract bleeding.

However, the recently published ASPREE randomized clinical trial found that cancer mortality was 31% HIGHER in aspirin users:

"Cancer was the major contributor to the higher mortality in the aspirin group, accounting for 1.6 excess deaths per 1000 person-years. Cancer-related death occurred in 3.1% of the participants in the aspirin group and in 2.3% of those in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.56)."

nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/N...

I do not know if it applies to prostate cancer in particular, but we all may want to avoid aspirin until we know more. There will be a longer f/u in the future. It also had no statistically significant effect on heart disease, but DID cause major hemorrhagic bleeding:

nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/N...

You may have missed this prospective randomized trial of aspirin. It was small, and only up to 2 years of follow-up, but it found that:

"Our data do not show that aspirin or levofloxacin help to decrease the incidence of prostate cancer occurrence, delay castration-resistant prostate cancer transformation, or reduce tumour-associated death. "

thelancet.com/journals/lanc...

Other observational studies show no benefit:

"There was no association between aspirin use after a prostate cancer diagnosis and lethal disease in this cohort of prostate cancer survivors."

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

"We found no evidence of an association between low-dose aspirin use before or after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality, after potential confounders were accounted for, in UK prostate cancer patients."

link.springer.com/article/1...

"A HIGHER proportion of [aspirin] users (63.5%) and other NSAID users (61.2%) had PC compared with nonusers (41.9%). Clinically significant PC was MORE common among [aspirin] users (34.9%) compared with other NSAID users (20.0%) and nonusers (20.9%).

goldjournal.net/article/S00...

'We found no protective effect of aspirin, statins or antidiabetics in terms of risk for any PCa or high-grade PCa. Use of any statins was associated with an elevated risk of being diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer."

ejcancer.com/article/S0959-...

"The post-diagnostic use of aspirin is not associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer outcomes. Increased risks were restricted to patients initiating these drugs after their diagnosis, suggesting a noncausal association."

auajournals.org/doi/abs/10....

Inflammation is a very complex phenomenon. For prostate cancer, it seems that less aggressive forms put out more pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas more aggressive forms put out more anti-inflammatory cytokines. This may be the reason for the equivocal findings. There may be some subgroups (possibly those on active surveillance) who benefit from aspirin. However in the PROVENT trial, progression was higher than expected:

bjui-journals.onlinelibrary...

There may be other subgroups (possibly elderly men with advanced PC) where aspirin may hasten death. Until we know more, caution is advised.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Tall_Allen

Thanks. I'll go through these studies. I have not seen enough data to determine if aspirin increases or decreases high grade PCa progression. Many of the studies that I have seen are observational and many focus on the risk of PCa incidence. The treatments to reduce PCa incidence is very different than treatment of non-metastatic HS high grade PCa. Throw in personal cardiac risk, family history, therapies that might increase cardiac risk (e.g., BAT), etc., and it's not an easy call.

Aspirin reduces the risk of cardiovascular events, but it increases the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and hemorrhagic stroke. Both CVD risk and risk for gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, and hemorrhagic stroke (with or without aspirin use) increase with age. Given the increased risk of bleeding in conjunction with age, I plan to think about where I am and adapt if needed.

maley2711 profile image
maley2711 in reply to smurtaw

It seems clear that there is in no way overwhelming evidence that aspirin should be SOC for PCa...see TA's links. Of course, a person can always pick and choose among studies to find one or more that support the bias of that person. This includes MDs !!

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel in reply to maley2711

My lose dose aspirin was prescribed for cardiac health concerns many years ago. The PCa treatment I'm now on is likely increasing the CVD risk so I see no value in stopping the aspirin.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Benkaymel

Mine was also prescribed for CVD.

For PCa I have only seen low-quality studies.

ADD-ASPIRIN should shed some light on aspirin use for cancer but the trial will take years. clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show...

The results will be exciting, but I will continue until my MO and my PCP think it is in my best interest to stop low-dose aspirin. By the time ADD-ASPIRIN is complete, I will be in the over 60 group and continuation of my low-dose aspirin therapy will likely depend on my CVD risk.

maley2711 profile image
maley2711 in reply to Benkaymel

I didn't say that....not all men on ADT . Refer to TA's study links above.

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel in reply to maley2711

I didn't accuse you of saying anything, maley2711. I was making a general statement on the thread in response to all previous comments and shouldn't have used the reply to you personally link so apologise for that.

TommyCarz22 profile image
TommyCarz22 in reply to Tall_Allen

I was advised AGAINST continuing my low dose aspirin regiment

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to TommyCarz22

How old are you? The SOC recommendations changed recently and if you over 60 and don't have an increased risk of CVD it isn't recommended. I'm under 60 and have an increased CVD risk so my SOC MO and my SOC PCP both want me to take it. The best benefits are for men 50-59 with average or above average CVD risk.

Tall_Allen profile image
Tall_Allen in reply to TommyCarz22

I agree. No known value for most people and some serious cumulative morbidity.

lewicki profile image
lewicki in reply to Tall_Allen

Pretty solid answers.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to lewicki

ASPREE is the only one that is high-quality. If you are over 70 it might apply to you. Something to keep in mind as I get older and if we don't have any other data at the time.

The rest are observational and/or low-quality or simply do not apply. I saw one that was for active surveillance - if you are in this group you are far past active surveillance. Another one concluded that aspirin and NSAID use made it easier to diagnose PCa - if this is true then it provides a simple way for your "risk" to increase. Another was a study that didn't have a control arm. The objective was simply to determine if aspirin was safe. Another concluded that aspirin use was potentially non-causal. A couple of them concluded nothing.

That isn't TA's fault and he brought one good one to my attention. To my knowledge, conclusive evidence does not exist. So I choose to look at the CVD risks and SOC recommendations and listen to my doctors on this one. I also take into account my higher than normal platelet density and particular therapies (I mix high testosterone with ADT cycles and both of them carry CVD risks).

For some of us, NHANES is a better observational database than most of the others. The NHANES database is closer to me in many ways than a random sampling of a population. And we have a somewhat homogenous group and, of course, this makes comparisons more meaningful (I view NHANES studies as high-quality observational studies. Not nearly in the same league as a good RCT but much better than a random observational study and far better than rat, petri dish, or case studies).

You can find as many observational, rat, and petri dish studies that "prove" "benefits". IMO observational can be helpful for research seeds but it is useless to base practical applications on observational, rat, and petri dish studies.

One thing that comes to my mind is why are these guys on aspirin therapy. Are they generally unhealthy? Why would we expect them to do better and have less cancer risk than guys who are healthy? I haven't heard anyone here suggest that aspirin is a wonder drug.

Tall_Allen profile image
Tall_Allen in reply to lewicki

If the purported benefit of aspirin for prostate cancer has to do with COX inhibition, a more specific COX-2 inhibitor was found to have no benefit as a single therapy.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Tall_Allen

That is part of the speculation. Another avenue that I have seen discussed is reduced platelet aggregation. CVD benefits are what my MO and PCP are after. I don't know if they care at all about PCa progression reduction.

Grandpa4 profile image
Grandpa4

I was asked to see a cardiologist who specializes in the cardiovascular complications of ADT and Abi when I started then. My only risk factor was a calcium score of 40 but he recommended ASA. Not wild about ASA because it causes bleeding with minimal trauma and I am very active with lots of little traumas but study makes me feel better about taking it.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito

Thank you Smarty, a baby asprin is not a bad idea, my hesitation is other supplements that may thin blood, then throwing an asprin in the mix?

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Miomarito

You could have a blood viscosity test to check it.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to smurtaw

yes, scheduled in November. Thank you Smurtaw! Oh, what did you mean , your book, and the title please .

FRTHBST profile image
FRTHBST

If CVD major concern, studies show enzymes such as Nattokinase (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl... and Serrapeptase to be effective in breaking down fibrin. Nattokinase has been used in Japan for decades. These authors make this interesting comment about Serrapeptase ,"It can dissolve only dead and damaged tissue without damaging the living tissue. Thus, removal of deposits from the arteries such as cholesterol, fatty substances, cellular waste products etc. can be achieved by SP. " pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/314...

Nal has posted numerous times one these and other enzymes such as lumbrokinase in relation to effects on fibrin formation which is an aspect of cancer progression as well as CVD.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to FRTHBST

I sometimes use natto. I try to get it from the food though and not from a tablet.

in reply to smurtaw

I'm taking a garlic supplement that has natto in it...along with a third component. I forget...its a heart health concoction. I can send you the name if your intersted...just PM me.

I don't have CVD per se...we all have some plaque, atherosclerosis as we age...it's part of the ageing process...some just have more for various reasons...diet, genetics and/or environment. Exercise and doctor visits are essential...I know 2 people within the last 2 months drop dead of heart attacks....one was 51 and the other 60. too darn young and most like preventable (first one for sure...never went to the doctor). The natto helps break up clots from what I understand which is important as we get older since they definitely occur frequently......there is a clot phenomena in men once we turn 40...increase in blood clots in the legs.

Your posts are great discussions starters.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to smurtaw

oh gross, I tasted this in Japan. It tastes terrible and smells like chicken poop or some strange odor. Oh man , I thought I was going to die lol

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Miomarito

Chicken poop is underrated. Good source of vitamins. If the chickens are free-range then it has a good amount of predigested protein.

Put some salt on it. Heat it up and stir. YUM!!!

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to smurtaw

one night, we found a McDonalds… best food we tasted in two weeks. We were ready to camp out there.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Miomarito

If I had to choose between Micky's and cachexia, the big Mick would win every time and twice on Sundays.

CAMPSOUPS profile image
CAMPSOUPS in reply to smurtaw

Been eating natto since about 1976 except for a dry spell for a few years that we lived in Iowa.

Need that little bit of Japanese mustard in it too and a bit of soy and diced shallots. Tasty on top of rice. Never ate it like medicine.

I was a Navy Corpsman in Japan so of course all the 18-19 year olds go out drinking heavy and end up in the dispensary. When my wife (girlfriend at the time) first offered it to me I was like no way. It looks like what the guys puke up after a night drinking whiskey and cokes. Finally tried it and really liked it.

Japan has more Michelin star restaurants than even France if I remember right which includes Japanese and foreign food served. That perfection spills into everything--Mcdonalds, Pizza. Yea the best Mcdonalds food is in Japan.

Anyway I cant imagine though being in Japan and eating Mcdonalds its a true waste. My god. So much good food there and even for foreigners you will find comfort food in Japanese stews and so forth. Or one all foreigners seem to like (Eric Clapton's favorite and first dish I had when I arrived in Japan) Katsudon.

images.app.goo.gl/RbHqysX95...

Other good Japaneses food I would take over mcd's.

japanesecooking101.com/japa...

Or a recent lunch at my house.

natto included here in the twin cities at home
lokibear0803 profile image
lokibear0803 in reply to Miomarito

Yeah, that people in sushi bars will actually pay for natto is one more triumph of marketing over reason.

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to lokibear0803

Loki, there is not one sense that it satisfies.. it looks bad, tastes bad, smells bad and feels bad like a slimy something !

monte1111 profile image
monte1111 in reply to Miomarito

That's what my wife use to say.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to monte1111

Took the words out of my mouth.

That's what she said.

lokibear0803 profile image
lokibear0803 in reply to Miomarito

it sets a new standard for over-rated …

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to lokibear0803

I am laughing and really wasn’t thinking like that … you bad boys all need church!!!

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Miomarito

I for one do not need church. What I need is more chicken poop. Preferably cold with some hot fudge.

The facts are that you are the one who started the entire slimy, smelly train of thought. And then you say that WE need church?

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to smurtaw

haha Smarty ok fair assessment..going to church now❤️

Miomarito profile image
Miomarito in reply to FRTHBST

I keep reading about Serrapeptase and understand that many people with cancer take this...I don't know enough about it but always looking for information, thank you for your links!

anonymoose2 profile image
anonymoose2

Me personally aspirin was good to take away dead cancer cells after RT to prostate.

There after I wouldn’t take aspirin unless my doctor had good reasons to do so.

Just my 2 cents.

Dayglow_Freak profile image
Dayglow_Freak

From my personal experiences, the benefits of daily low dose aspirin use isn't beneficial under most circumstances.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Dayglow_Freak

Did you have bleeding?

Dayglow_Freak profile image
Dayglow_Freak in reply to smurtaw

I'm a Retired Angiologist.

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Dayglow_Freak

I'm curious about someone in their 50s who is at risk of CVD issues. No matter what the situation you think it is not advised to use aspirin?

Claud68 profile image
Claud68

I posted this interesting study about aspirine 3 years ago:

healthunlocked.com/advanced...

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to Claud68

If I ever need to do RT I think aspirin might be useful. Also a high testosterone burst and and ADT session. Exercise also plays well with RT. Fasting and statins might help. There are some others, but they are more speculative.

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel

As with so many medications and supplements, there's contradictory evidence and opinion on whether they are doing good, bad or indifference. It's interesting that when one is about to have a surgical procedure, the doctor asks if you are on any blood thinning agents and when you say aspirin, they always say - oh, that's OK or it doesn't count. So is it worth taking at all for CV health in that case then??

My dad had ischaemic heart disease and took daily low dose aspirin for about 30 years until he died of Myocardial Ischaemia at the age of 91. I wonder if the daily aspirin made any difference either way for him ...?

No_stone_unturned profile image
No_stone_unturned

Here’s some additional info in regards to hearing loss progression from the use of pain killers.

aarp.org/health/conditions-...

Worth noting:

“Fortunately, frequent use of low-dose aspirin (100 mg or less) has not been linked to hearing-related side effects. Many older adults take a low dose of the drug daily to prevent cardiovascular disease.”

Benkaymel profile image
Benkaymel in reply to No_stone_unturned

Phew!

smurtaw profile image
smurtaw in reply to No_stone_unturned

Double Phew!

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