Advanced Prostate Cancer
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Association Between ADT and Risk of Dementia.

New study below.

It would be unfriendly to post the paper without suggestions as to how risk might be reduced.

ADT has a profound worsening effect on the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome [MetS]. MetS has an across the board negative effect on health & mortality. A paper last month reported:

"Increased risk of cognitive impairment in patients with components of metabolic syndrome." [2]

While there are no studies that would convince the scientists in this group, there are 180 PubMed hits for <polyphenols dementia>. A recent review paper offers a useful summary of what is known about curcumin, resveratrol, etc. [3]

"Exercise is associated with a delayed onset of dementia." [4]

The new Stanford study of "9272 men with prostate cancer (mean ... age, 66.9 ... years" reported that the risk of developing dementia was "7.9% among those who received ADT vs 3.5% in those who did not receive ADT", at five years.

-Patrick

[1] ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/277...

[2] ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

[3] mdpi.com/1420-3049/21/4/518...

[4] ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/277...

13 Replies
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Interesting subject. Have you thought of a effort regarding Non-THC cannabinoids that inhibit prostate carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo: pro-apoptotic effects and underlying mechanisms such as CBD to increase the potency of bicalutimide?

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Hi BigRich,

I find your line of thought also interesting. I live in a non-progressive state, so nothing on the lines of med MJ are on the horizon. I've been on cbd's for seven years now. Maybe I do smoke it to get a buzz, but on the other hand, I have no pain from the mets I have. I can't speak for the relation with bicalutimide, though.

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Joe,

We will have to see if Patrick takes my request for a research effort on his part to ascertain the potency increase of bicalutimide utilizing CBD's.

Rich

1 like
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Rich,

There are a number of studies that found synergy with bicalutimide & some other agent, but the cell signaling pathways involved do not point to CBD as an obvious partner.

e.g. +curcumin:

jeccr.biomedcentral.com/art...

-Patrick

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Patrick,

Thank you for the information; however, please read Br J Pharmacol. 2013 Jan; 168(1): 79–102.

doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02027.x

PMCID: PMC3570006

and give me your thoughts.

Rich

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Rich,

I have read the Italian mouse study [1], but am none the wiser why CBD would "potentiate the effects of bicalutamide".

"CBD significantly enhanced the efficacy of bicalutamide (10 µM) on LNCaP cells, although only at the highest dose tested"

"In {an} experiment with xenograft tumours from LNCaP cells, two doses (25 and 50 mg·kg−1, p.o.) of bicalutamide alone or CBD–BDS alone (100 mg·kg−1, i.p.) produced little effect on tumour weight and volume at the end of the treatment, possibly because this experiment was interrupted after only 35 days. However, co-administration of bicalutamide at 25 mg·kg−1 and CBD–BDS significantly inhibited xenograft growth (Figure 2C)."

"In {another} experiment, ... After 47 days of treatment, CBD–BDS plus bicalutamide significantly prolonged survival as compared with bicalutamide or CBD–BDS alone"

There seems to be a hands-off approach to CBD in the U.S. at present, with sellers claiming to being able to ship it to every state. So, for Casodex users, one can self-experiment. Perhaps someone will report back if CBD had any effect on PSA doubling time?

-Patrick

[1] ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

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Patrick,

Thank you for the information. I would like to know what the side effects are in taking CBD, short and long term. Also, does CBD compete with Bicalutimide in any pathway?

Rich

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Rich,

I have not heard of CBD side effects at the suggested doses. However, recognize that CBD products can contain small, but variable, amounts of THC. Long term? I don't know.

Basically, Casodex competes with androgen for binding to AR. I don't know if it can do anything else. I doubt that there would be conflict involving a cell signaling pathway.

-Patrick

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My concern was CBD interfering with bicalutimide's journey along any pathway. I know that Casodex blocks testosterone from the AR receptor on the cell. Is it possible that CBD could compete with Casodex for the AR receptor on the cell?

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Cannabinoids have their own receptors. Promiscuity has been reported with vanilloid receptors, but not with AR.

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Patrick,

Thank you!

Then in my example only Casodex and testosterone compete for the AR cell receptor.

Rich

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yes

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Patrick,

You are a good teacher. I thank you. I told my wife, I enjoy reading your posts.

Rich

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